My Ranking Of The Beatles’ Movies

the beatles movies

One of my favourite things about The Beatles is their movies. They’re not cinematic masterpieces, or anything, but they have a certain loveable charm about them. Watching their movies has become something of a ritual for me, and I’ve loved them ever since I’ve been a fan!

So today, I thought I’d rank The Beatles’ movies in order, from least-favourite to favourite. Of course, this is only my opinion. But anyway…

5. Magical Mystery Tour (1967)

MMT_poster

Paul made a lot of good decisions in the late-’60s. Like Sgt Pepper, or his distrust of Allen Klein. Magical Mystery Tour was not one of these. The film has the honour of being the only Beatles film I dislike.

The movie makes no sense, whatsoever. I’m still yet to work out what the wizards are about – did they plan the mystery tour, or are they there for no reason at all? And what about the “view” during the ‘Flying’ sequence? What filmic purpose does the stripper fulfil? Who are the people on the bus supposed to be? I presume much of the comedy consists of The Beatles’ inside jokes, but as the viewer is not privy to these, they are left to wonder what on Earth is going on. The movie’s considerable lack of a storyline, however, is the film’s most serious downfall. This does not help the consistency of the film, and much of, if not all, of the scenes seem to have been filmed for the sake of it. Its incoherent & amateurish atmosphere made it quite cringeworthy to watch in parts, and I found it to mostly be a product of badly-made self-indulgence.

There are, however, some highlights. I’ve always loved the ‘Blue Jay Way’ song sequence, for the wonderfully-psychedelic camera work, and the fact that the choreography in the ‘Your Mother Should Know’ scene actually worked is pretty cool, too. And, of course, the music is simply wonderful – boasting tracks like ‘I Am The Walrus’ and ‘Fool On The Hill’ – and the accompanying album is perhaps one of The Beatles’ best. However, I felt the positives were somewhat outweighed, and that its status as “one of the most expensive home movies ever” is justified.

4. Let It Be (1970)

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I really like Let It Be. The Beatles must be the only band to have such a fly-on-the-wall documentary featuring such a seminal part of their history behind them, and for that, I’m very grateful!

There is no denying that the film is incredibly difficult to watch in parts. Over its course, you watch the band fall apart before your eyes. You see Paul become more domineering, and more desperate to keep The Beatles alive. You see George become increasingly disillusioned with the band. You see the affect that John’s heroin addiction at the time was having. And oh, I felt so much pity on poor Ringo, who’s clearly fed up with the other three’s almost-constant fighting.

However, the good moments are really good. Classics like ‘Two Of Us’, ‘Across The Universe’, ‘Don’t Let Me Down’ and ‘Oh! Darling’ – and even tunes like ‘Octopus’s Garden’ – are created within the film, and watching their evolution is fascinating viewing. And of course, the last 20 minutes of the film consists of the famous Rooftop Concert, one of the most iconic moments in music history. The Beatles’ live performance is stunning, especially considering that they’d been confined to the studio for the previous three years. The magic between the four is enthralling to watch, and the reactions of the surrounding residents are incredibly interesting, too. I find it sad that the only way you can watch the film currently is on bad-quality bootleg, though it’s a must-watch for any Beatles fan!

3. A Hard Day’s Night (1964)

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A Hard Day’s Night is arguably the best Beatles film. Rotten Tomatoes ranks it as the fifth best film of all time, and it has been credited with inventing both the mockumentary and the music clip. It has also been said to have influenced the way that movies and music performances were filmed, too. The Beatles’ humour is at its sharpest and wittiest, their music at its most joyfully poppy and the band at the height of their teenage-orientated success.

The Beatles had never acted before A Hard Day’s Night, but there are so many great moments within the film. My favourite is perhaps this scene featuring George – the humour is so sarcastically cynical and deadpan, and it’s absolutely hilarious! Other favourites of mine include the scene in which John plays with a toy boat in the bath (so ridiculously silly that it actually works) and the scene where The Beatles visit a club, and the concert at the end of the film. The movie’s influence on music clips is also clear to to the modern viewer – the various techniques used in the ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’ sequences make for a swift departure from miming the songs, which was commonplace at the time. The faux-documentary presentation of the storyline also invented the “mockumentary”, and the irony and sheer ridiculousness of some of the band’s antics clearly influenced future films, such as This Is Spinal Tap. And of course, the music is great, too. The movie’s accompanying album of the same name was the only Beatles album to consist entirely of Lennon/McCartney songs, and though they are still reasonably poppy and “people-pleasing”, it’s clear that The Beatles were beginning to become the influential pop-culture icons they were to end up.

I had the pleasure of seeing A Hard Day’s Night in a cinema, last year, in HD and surround sound. It was a truly amazing experience, and I discovered a new love for the film. Perhaps the only reason it isn’t higher in my ranking is that it lacks the nostalgia that 2 & 1 have attached with them, for me.

2. Help! (1965)

beatles-help-poster

Help! – The Beatles’ second foray into the film industry – is not technically as good as A Hard Day’s Night. The humour isn’t quite as intelligent, and there’s a faint junket vibe wafting around it. However, I’ve always loved it.

The film, at various points, almost leaps off the screen in its vibrant technicolour. The Beatles’ apartment (furnished with a modernist aesthetic still considered stylish today), in particular, is displayed in comically bright hues of green, blue and orange. When an Eastern cult – the central villains of the movie – attempt to douse Ringo in their sacrificial paint, a river of red spills over the image. The stunning whites of the Swiss Alps glint in the ‘Ticket To Ride’ sequence, and the blue, sunny skies of the Bahamas provide contrast. Leading heroine’s Ahme’s costumes are shown in shades of rose-pink, turquoise and glimmering silver. The innovative and influential filming of scenes such as the ‘Another Girl’ song sequence feature a hint of proto-psychedelia, highlighting the changing times. The Beatles’ music featured in the film shows the end of their early era, predicting the changes that would come with the soon-to-follow Rubber Soul. The movie includes tracks like the folk-rock genius of ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’, the keyboard-driven rock of ‘The Night Before’, the beautifully guitar-driven ‘You’re Gonna Lose That Girl’ and, of course, ‘Help!’ itself, and the A-side of the accompanying album is one of my favourites of all time. And whilst the humour isn’t quite as intelligent as that of its predecessor, A Hard Day’s Night, the movie certainly has more than its fair share of witticisms and proto-Python skits. Some wonderfully-funny one-liners stemmed from the script, and of course, the entire film itself is a product of satire. It’s hilarious!

Help!, all in all, is a ridiculously funny and influential movie, showcasing some of The Beatles’ best tunes and foreshadowing their future direction. It was my original favourite Beatles film, and I must have watched it more than twenty times over the past two years!

1. Yellow Submarine (1968)

Beatles_Yellow_Submarine_move_poster

Yellow Submarine, in my opinion, is something that the other Beatles films aren’t; a cinematic masterpiece. And though the band were barely involved with it – only featuring for a few minutes at the end of the film – it has become my favourite Beatles movie.

Perhaps the most endearing point about the movie, for me, is its animation. Even more colourful than the bouncy technicolour of Help!, and psychedelically surrealistic & wildly chaotic, the movie is still considered mindblowing viewing over forty-five years after its release. Featuring highlights like the bold pop-art of the ‘Only A Northern Song’ scene, the darting flapper-throwback of the ‘Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds’, the contrasting minimalism of the ‘Nowhere Man’ scene and the futurism of the ‘It’s All Too Much’ sequence, the film is unarguably one of, if not the, most beautiful films of all time. The music, too, is exquisite – though much of the film consists of previously-released masterpieces such as ‘All You Need Is Love’ and the aforementioned ‘Nowhere Man’, the original songs are mostly darkly psychedelic, creative gems, including ‘Hey Bulldog’ and (the also aforementioned) ‘Only A Northern Song’ and ‘It’s All Too Much’. The humour, though overshadowed by the extraordinary visuals and music, is also stunningly funny. Many of the jokes consist of Beatle-themed puns, which any Beatles fan will appreciate, though many of the other jokes are wonderfully witty and sharp. The movie is clearly a product of its era, centring around a message of peace, love and good music. Some may argue that this is a negative, though I disagree. In a way, it is such an essence of its time that it hasn’t dated at all.

Yellow Submarine is a deserved classic. Innovative, mindblowing and a work of art in a way the other Beatles films are not, it is an exquisite piece of film history. The film was my first Beatles movie, and I’ve loved it ever since.

What’s your favourite Beatles film? How would you rank them? Be sure to tell me in the comments!

Words Are Flowing Out: My Favourite Beatles Quotes

How cool is this?! The original sketch for the cover of 'Revolver' (my favourite Beatles album).

How cool is this?! The original sketch for the cover of ‘Revolver’ (my favourite Beatles album).

[Just a note before I start writing…Recently I’ve gotten a lot of new followers, and I’d just like to say welcome to you all! I hope you enjoy reading my weekly/more frequent than weekly (when I have time) posts, and thank you for following! That goes for everyone, by the way — whether you’ve been here since I clicked the blue ‘Publish’ button for the very first time, or only for a couple of days (or something in between), thank you for reading and liking and sharing and (more recently) commenting! Now I’d better get on with the post…]

Apologies for not posting yesterday. I had a very good reason not to, though, which you will read about further down. But now I thought I would compile a list of my favourite Beatles quotes. Of course we all know that The Beatles always had something inspiring/witty/sad/mesmerising to say, and that we all will probably end up using at least one quote from each interview each of them gave. But I’ve realised that even more whilst researching for this post. The Beatles were very clever with words (as is — obviously — evident in their songs), and this translates to their interviews, as well. So here are some of my personal highlights — enjoy!

“Creativity is a gift. It doesn’t come through if the air is cluttered.”

– John Lennon.

“You’ve got as many lives as you like. And more…even ones you don’t want.”

– George Harrison.

“Nothing pleases me more than to go into a room and come out with a piece of music.”

– (Sir James) Paul McCartney (MBE)

“I was an only child, with three amazing brothers.”

– Ringo/Richard Starr/Starkey…

“Reality leaves a lot to the imagination.”

– John

“The Beatles saved the world the world from boredom.”

– George

“Microphones are just like people — if you shout at them, they get scared.”

– Paul

“When I was about twelve, I used to think I must be a genius but nobody’s noticed.”

– John

“I’d like to think that all the old Beatle fans have grown up and they’ve gotten married and they’ve all got kids and they’re all more responsible, but they still have a space in their hearts for us.”

– George

“The rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated.”

– Paul (or should that be Faul? I should do a post on PiD at some point…)

“Everything government touches turns to crap.”

– Ringo

“Trying to please everybody is impossible. If you did that, you’d end up in the middle with nobody liking you.”

–  John

“It’s nothing to do with how many years old you are, or how big your body is. It’s down to what your greater consciousness is, and if you can live in harmony with what’s going on in creation.”

– George

“I don’t work at being ordinary.”

– Paul

“I’ve never really done anything to create what happened. It creates itself.”

– Ringo

“Reality leaves a lot to the imagination.”

– John

“I’d rather be a musician than a rock star.”

– George

” My grandkids always beat me at Rock Band. And I say, Listen, you may beat me at Rock Band, but I made the original records, so shut up.”

– Paul

“My role in society, or any artist’s or poet’s role, is to try and express what we all feel. Not to tell people how to feel. Not as a preacher, not as a leader, but as a reflection of us all.”

– John

“It is better to be an outspoken atheist than a hypocrite.”

George

“Sadness isn’t sadness. It’s happiness in a black jacket. Tears are not tears. They’re balls of laughter dipped in salt. Death is not death. It’s life that’s jumped off a tall cliff.”

– Paul

“I like Beethoven — especially the poems.”

– Ringo

And there we go! Beatles quotes in a nutshell (bringing back that ol’ joke, is tangerinetrees!)… If you know of any other Beatles quotes that you absolutely love, feel free to put them in the Comments below!

And as for my exciting happening on the weekend…I saw A Hard Day’s Night on the big screen! And it was nothing short of absolutely, completely and utterly amazing! Don’t think I stopped smiling for the entire duration of the film 🙂 … I noticed a lot of stuff that I hadn’t noticed before (and I’ve watched it about ten times), and though I’ve watched it before in HD, nothing beats seeing a film on a big screen. Especially AHDN. The audience was full of laughter (though I must have been the annoying audience member that cracked up every two minutes — I started laughing just before John cuts the tape measure and goes, ‘I now declare this bridge open,’ for example…), and we all clapped and screamed at the end. But, wow, it was amazing. And to think that I thought just a few months ago (see June and July archives) that I’d never see it on the big screen… I guess I’ll just need to hope for a cinema release of Help! and Yellow Submarine in 2015 and 2018 (respectively)… 😉

And that’s my post for this week! Stay tuned for something (I’ve got a few ideas that I need to decide on) this weekend, and a profile on perhaps my most valuable LP in ‘My Beatles Record Collection’ for the next. But until then, good day sunshine 🙂

My Beatles Record Collection Pt. 3 – ‘Beatles For Sale’

As pretty much everyone in Australia knows, The (Rolling) Stones played Adelaide Oval last night, so I will post this picture in commemoration. We were actually in the CBD last night to see a movie, and thanks to my dad driving past The Stones' venue, we got to hear them play 'Honky Tonk Women'. Not my favourite Stones song, but there's no denying it sounded good live.

As pretty much everyone in Australia knows, The (Rolling) Stones played Adelaide Oval last night, so I will post this picture. We were actually in the CBD last night to see a movie, and thanks to my dad driving past The Stones’ venue on the way home, we got to hear them play ‘Honky Tonk Women’! Not my favourite Stones song (by a long shot), but there’s no denying it sounded good live.

It’s that time of month again! Time for another installation of ‘My Beatles Record Collection’! And this month, it’s [insert signature Ringo drum fill]…Beatles For SaleBeatles For Sale was The Beatles’ fourth studio album, and was the last to comply by the covers/originals formula that also went for Please Please Me and With The Beatles (though both Help! and Let It Be included covers as well). It was also The Beatles’ first gatefold album (and must have been one of the earliest examples of such packaging), and is the first album on which one can really hear The Beatles start to mature. Bob Dylan’s influence on the group (especially John) is particularly evident, and the bulk of John’s first explorations of confessional lyricism (he was suffering from depression at the time) can be found on this album. The UK cover/back cover are actually two of my favourite pictures of the group (the latter can be found on my school book labels!), but sadly the cover butcherers also known as EMI Australia decided to ruin the cover here. Not many people rate this album particularly highly, but I beg to differ. Some of my favourite Beatles songs are on this album! But onto vinyl…

I have a couple of dream vinyl purchases. Y’know, a numbered White Album, that sort of thing. And one of the things on my dream list is a UK first-edition Beatles For Sale. But sadly, it is exactly what the list suggests — a dream (at the moment). My copy of Beatles For Sale is much like my A Hard Day’s Night — a ’70s “orange label” repressing. With the Australian cover (which means no gatefold). But oh well. I only got it for about 30 bucks (plus sale discount), and it was definitely 30 bucks well spent! The vinyl doesn’t play as well as some of my other records, but there are no skips and the crackle (most of which probably comes from our record player) is bearable. Here are some pictures:

beatles for sale one

Here is that dreadful Australian cover. Apparently the images are from one of the band’s Sydney concerts. On second thoughts, the cover isn’t that bad — it just looks quite ‘yick’ compared to the beautiful British one! It is pretty bad, though, as far as Beatles covers go. I can see why John complained to EMI. (Still better than any One Direction album cover! Hee hee!) My cover actually needs a glue job, ‘cos the original glue across the top edge has perished. A job for me at some point, I s’pose.

beatles for sale two

The back of the record. A similar kind of thing (the sleeve notes, the track listing, the title and the picture) appeared in black on the left side of the British gatefold sleeve. As you can see, there are no backflaps, and if you look carefully, you can see the record is in stereo (like all other Beatles re-releases of the time). The picture is actually quite outdated, if you think about it. It appears to be A Hard Day’s Night era, and The Beatles had ditched the suits and had grown their hair a bit since then. I quite like it, though.

beatles for sale three

Here’s the really interesting thing about the cover — not specific to the Australian version, but who cares. And what is that thing, you ask? Why, Derek Taylor’s sleeve notes! Especially this quote…

It isn’t all currency or current though. There’s a priceless history between these covers. None of us is getting any younger. When, in a generation or so, a radio-active, cigar-smoking child, picnicking on Saturn, asks you what the Beatle affair was all about – ‘Did you actually know them?’ – don’t try to explain all about the long hair and the screams! Just play the child a few tracks from this album and he’ll probably understand what it was all about. The kids of AD2000 will draw from the music much the same sense of well-being and warmth as we do today.

And Derek Taylor must be psychic! Well, he got the Saturn bit wrong (that’ll probably happen in AD3000!), but the bolded sentence is truer than ever. Yes, the kids of AD2000 do draw the same sense of well-being and warmth as they did in the ’60s. And not just 2000. The children of the 2010s do to. And I bet you that the cycle will continue on forever. ‘Cos that is the reality of priceless music.

beatles for sale four

Here’s a picture of the LP with the cover. As you can see, it’s an “orange label” version (most likely late ’70s), and like all Australian pressings (including firsts — I actually have a first-edition Australian), it comes in a plastic sleeve, as opposed to the paper ones found in UK pressings.

beatles for sale five

And here’s Side Two of the LP. Very good condition — not a scratch! It crackles a lot, though, ‘cos it’s so thin and our record player is about as old as The Beatles’ albums. I love our record player dearly, though. Probably my favourite piece of furniture (it’s a proper stereogram) in the house.

And there you go! ‘My Beatles Record Collection’ done for another month. Stay tuned in particular for the next four months, ‘cos many of my more interesting and rare and valuable pieces will feature.

Last night, I went to see a wonderful Spanish film called Living Is Easy (With Eyes Closed). The film (named after a line in ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ is about a Spanish teacher called Antonio who is an obsessive Beatles/John fan. When he hears that John is filming How I Won The War in Almeria, he makes a trip out there from his town. On the way, he picks up two teenage hitch-hikers, and the film is basically about their adventures and Antonio’s many plans for meeting John. As long as you don’t mind reading subtitles, I highly recommend it! Google it for more information.

AND IMPORTANT NEWS FOR AUSTRALIAN READERS: A HARD DAY’S NIGHT IS COMING TO AUSTRALIA! Yay! After I thought for so long that it wouldn’t. AHDN is screening in its beautiful remastered glory as a part of the British Film Festival. If you’re Adelaidean like me, it’ll be on at the Palace Nova Cinema on November 9th at 7:30pm. Check the Film Festival’s website if you live elsewhere. But anyway, we’ve already got tickets, and I’m really excited! If you’ve been reading since the beginning, you’ll know how much I wanted to see the film on the big screen, and now I have the chance! I’ll be sure to write all about it after I’ve seen it. I guess last night will go down in my mind as the night I saw a fabulous film, found out A Hard Day’s Night was coming to Australia and heard The Stones play live.

And this Wednesday is the Rodriguez concert! I, too, am really excited about that! My first big concert! Yay! I’ll write all about it next weekend. But for now, good day sunshine! 🙂

My Ranking of The Beatles’ Albums

The Beatles with four of their five first LPs. One would assume the photo was taken in between August (Help!) and December (Rubber Soul), 1965.

The Beatles with four of their five first LPs. One would assume the photo was taken in between August (Help!) and December (Rubber Soul), 1965.

A note to begin with: The sun is up, the sky is blue (it’s beautiful and so are you / dear Prudence — why won’t you come out to play?), ‘All You Need Is The Beatles’ is only one hundred and thirty six views away from its thousandth view (well, it’ll be even closer by the time you read this) and COMMENTS HAVE FINALLY BEEN ENABLED ON THIS BLOG! Yay! So be sure to send me a postcard, drop me a line, stating point of view! 

I had this idea first a few months ago (about a month after I started this blog. It’s funny to think that it’s four months old — not that old in the scheme of things, I guess, but it feels more like last month that I created my WordPress account and posted my ‘Welcome’ post, as opposed to over a season), and I thought I’d do it today! I hadn’t actually listened to all of The Beatles’ studio albums at that point (well, I knew most of the songs, but anyway), and I’m listening to the only one I haven’t yet done so yet right now. I will not be including Magical Mystery Tour in this post as I believe it is not a proper studio album (instead a Capitol Records butcher job of the songs off the film and the band’s 1967 — that’s not to say I don’t love the album 🙂 ), and please remember this is only my humble opinion. Oh, and please remember that a worst ranking on a Beatles album ranking list in my case still makes it better than pretty much everything ever recorded (with maybe two or three exceptions). Pretty much everything. So I still love it dearly, but just not as much as number one!

Okay, okay, yes, yes — I’ll shut up now and get on with the ranking. Here we go!

12. Yellow Submarine

yellow submarine

I feel The Beatles (or Apple) really should have gone ahead with their original idea for the release of the Yellow Submarine track — a double EP, as with the Parlophone release of the Magical Mystery Tour soundtrack. The songs ‘Yellow Submarine’ (whilst it probably needed to be included on the album for obvious reasons) and ‘All You Need Is Love’ (though I believe the ‘Yellow Submarine’ version is different from the better-known one) had already been included on different albums/singles/EPs, and did we really need the classical George Martin Orchestra bits on the album? This is, in fact, the only one I haven’t listened to in full before now (I opted for the better — IMO — Yellow Submarine Songtrack) — I have watched Yellow Submarine a billion-trillion (okay, maybe not quite that much) times, though, so I’ve of course heard them before. Actually physically LISTENING to the album does make me think that Apple didn’t need to follow in the direction of the Capitol butchers [insert certain famous R. Whitaker-photographed cover here] and create a soundtrack in the style of the US A Hard Day’s Night and Help! albums, but it also takes me back to that Spring day a year ago when I first watched Yellow Submarine. I remember sitting in our top room (the DVD player with the main TV wouldn’t actually work), absorbed by psychedelic masterpiece animation (‘Eleanor Rigby’ and ‘It’s All Too Much’ come to mind) and the middle-era Beatles tunes, many of which I hadn’t heard before (the only album I owned was 1, and I’d only listened as far as The Fabs’ other well-known hits and Rubber Soul).

Despite my criticism of the inclusion of the GMO soundtrack and songs which had already been on other releases, I absolutely love the originals! ‘Hey Bulldog’, ‘It’s All Too Much’ and ‘Only A Northern Song’ are some of my favourite Beatles songs, and I don’t want to imagine life without them — thus I don’t want to imagine life with the Yellow Submarine album, either!

DID YOU KNOW? Yellow Submarine was the first album to feature the “devil horns” hand symbol on the cover.

BEST SONGS: ‘Hey Bulldog’, ‘It’s All Too Much’, ‘Only A Northern Song’

11. A Hard Day’s Night

a hard day's night

Despite the above being the background image of this blog, A Hard Day’s Night is far from my favourite Beatles album. Why, you ask? Here is my reasoning:

Those of you who know me will know I’m a alt./indie/folk/psych rock fiend when I’m not listening to The Beatles. The Beatles usually satisfy this love — much of their early/late-era stuff rocks really hard, and they were of course comprised of folk and psych rock in their middle era (my favourite). Their only album that I find too poppy is A Hard Day’s Night. Whilst the album is made up completely of Lennon/McCartney compositions, their songwriting hadn’t really started to mature yet, and it’s still all I-love-her-and-she-loves-me (excepting ‘I’ll Cry Instead’, which was probably The Fab Four’s first example of confessional lyricism). I’m not a huge fan of the title song, which I find too poppy in particular, and ‘And I Love Her’ doesn’t have the bluesy Lennon touch (though I think he contributed) that other McCartney ballads have (i.e. ‘Michelle’), and ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’ I feel needs more pizzazz (I do actually like these songs, though). So I’m probably being a bit controversial citing a so-called “leap” in The Beatles’ career one of my least favourite Beatles albums, but who cares? There are actually some songs on the above that I love dearly, which will be listed below.

DID YOU KNOW? A Hard Day’s Night is the only Beatles album to only comprise of Lennon/McCartney compositions. The next all-original album — Rubber Soul — also had two Harrison compositions.

BEST SONGS: ‘I Should Have Known Better’, ‘Tell Me Why’, ‘If I Fell’, ‘Things We Said Today’ and ‘You Can’t Do That’.

10. With The Beatles

with the beatles

Whilst I think this beats the album below in the covers department (except here in Australia. Ugh. The Australian cover is atrocious. EMI Australia is the Capitol of the record-cover world), I don’t like it as much  I actually rank it equal to the below (you’ll have to wait to see what it is), but one had to go before. I don’t think the covers are as electrifying as the ones on the below, but then my favourite Beatles cover is on With The Beatles (it’s ‘Money (That’s What I Want’). I do genuinely love this album, but I do prefer The Beatles’ later stuff, so unfortunately it ended up here.

DID YOU KNOW? With The Beatles includes the song ‘I Wanna Be Your Man’, which was the Rolling Stones’ first hit. John and Paul finished the song off in the corner of a room whilst Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were talking.

BEST SONGS: ‘It Won’t Be Long’, ‘Not A Second Time’, ‘Money (That’s What I Want)’, ‘Please Mr Postman’

9. Please Please Me

beatles please please me

This is what ‘the below’ is! Please Please Me! You can probably see what I mean about With The Beatles having a better cover. It certainly ain’t Revolver. And I can see why The Beatles were going to parody it for the cover of Get Back-turn-Let It Be. And Ringo has a quiff.

But seriously (without out-of-the-blue remarks concerning Richard Starkey’s choice of hair styling in the early 1960s), this album is a Beatlemaniac’s secret weapon whilst trying to point out that The Beatles were a rock band, end of story. They rock dead hard on this album. And no wonder – they had come straight from The Cavern and Hamburg!

DID YOU KNOW? Most of Please Please Me was recorded within a marathon 12-hour session. John had a cold that day, and promptly lost his voice after the recording of ‘Twist and Shout’ (the last song to be recorded).

BEST SONGS: ‘Please Please Me’, ‘There’s A Place’, ‘Baby It’s You’ (I have liked the Shirlees’ version for years, so I was pleasantly surprised when I discovered The Beatles did it), ‘I Saw Her Standing There’.

8. Beatles For Sale

beatles for sale

This is, personally, one of my favourite Beatles covers, but of course the stupid cover butcher-rers over here in the Southern Hemisphere had to ruin it by creating a rubbish replacement. More on that later, though.

This is actually one of my favourite Beatles albums, despite it being 8. If you asked me tomorrow, it could be in a completely different place. It’s got some of my favourite Lennon compositions (‘I’m A Loser’, ‘I Don’t Want To Spoil The Party’), some of the most beautiful harmonies John and Paul ever did (‘Baby’s In Black’) and of course the amazing drums in ‘What You’re Doing’!

DID YOU KNOW? Beatles For Sale (along with With The Beatles) was one of the two albums to have an alternate cover in Australia. Apparently John actually wrote a letter to EMI in protest, but alas to no avail. C’mon EMI Australia – listen to the artist!

BEST SONGS: ‘No Reply’, ‘I’m A Loser’, ‘Baby’s In Black’, ‘I Don’t Want To Spoil The Party’, ‘What You’re Doing’

7. Let It Be

LetItBe

I love this album, but it’s mish-mashy. And it has my least-favourite Beatles song (the Spector version of ‘The Long And Winding Road’. Despite the fact he is a crazed murderer who let off guns in recording sessions at John’s ‘Lost Weekend’, I love his work on John and George’s stuff and most of Let It Be. But ‘The Long And Winding Road’ should have been left as it was.) on it. But it has ‘Across The Universe’! And the album version of ‘Let It Be’ (which I think is far superior to the single)! And ‘I’ve Got A Feeling’! And ‘For You Blue’! And ‘Get Back’!

DID YOU KNOW? Though it was the last album to be released, Let It Be was the second-to-last album to be recorded. Abbey Road was actually recorded after.

BEST SONGS: ‘Across The Universe’, ‘Let It Be’ (album version), ‘I’ve Got A Feeling’, ‘For You Blue’, ‘Get Back.

6. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

sgt pepper

I know this is supposed to be The Beatles’ best album. But I beg to differ. I don’t feel it possesses the same magic that I feel a certain other Beatles psychedelic masterpiece does. But I still love this album. I listened to it the other day, and it was better than I remembered it. It did give me that euphoric feeling I get sometimes whilst listening to the Fabs, but not as strong as some other albums. But anyway, the thing is beautiful. Completely and utterly beautiful. And that is all.

DID YOU KNOW? The crowd of people on the cover include Bob Dylan, Stu Sutcliffe, Mae West and Shirley Temple. John suggested having Jesus and Hitler, but that didn’t happen. Gandhi was originally on the cover, but was painted out at the request of EMI.

BEST SONGS: ‘Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’, ‘Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds’, ‘Lovely Rita’, ‘A Day In The Life’

5. Help!

beatles-help-uk-cover-art

 

Help! was the second Beatles studio album and the first actual LP I bought. And yes, I prefer it to Sgt. Pepper — but as I said above, if you asked me tomorrow, it’d probably be a different story.

But however, The Beatles were maturing, and the film soundtrack side in particular is impeccable. Everything from ‘Help!’ to ‘The Night Before’, ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’ to ‘Ticket To Ride’ was of incredibly high calibre, and breaking boundaries like never before. The second side, not so much, but c’mon – it has ‘Dizzy Miss Lizzy’!

DID YOU KNOW? The song ‘Help!’ was actually a cry for help from John, who was depressed, trapped by Beatlemania and unsure of the path of his life at the time. He later called this period (going from about late ’64 to late ’65 — poor thing) his ‘Fat Elvis Period’. Some of his best work (i.e. ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’, ‘Nowhere Man’) came from this period, but at a cruel cost.

BEST SONGS: The entire first side.

4. The Beatles (a.k.a. The White Album)

the white album

 

This would have been far from my favourite Beatles album if you’d asked me a couple of months ago. Then I went to the White Album Concert, and was utterly blown away! It came further and further to the top of this list, and it made it to here!

Everything (well, nearly everything) in this album is good. And the thing is that there’s something for everybody. Whether you like hard-rocking proto-metal (‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, ‘Helter Skelter’), Eric Clapton (‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’), soft and hypnotic fingerpicking (‘Dear Prudence’, ‘Blackbird’), satirical social commentary (‘Piggies’), Paul’s — quote John — ‘granny s**t’ (‘Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da’) or even 9-minute experimental avant-garde-ness that involves a monotone voice reciting ‘number nine, number nine’ and Yoko Ono saying ‘You become naked’ (‘Revolution 9’), there’s something for you. And then there’s more!

DID YOU KNOW? The White Album includes John’s only solo Beatle track, ‘Julia’. Paul had been recording stuff by himself and releasing it as The Beatles as early as Help!.

BEST SONGS: ‘Dear Prudence’, ‘Long Long Long’, ‘Cry Baby Cry’, ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, ‘Helter Skelter’, ‘Blackbird’– too many to list. That’s the beauty of a double album.

3. Abbey Road

Beatles_-_Abbey_Road

I used to always think of Abbey Road and Sgt. Pepper as part one and part two. Both experimental, both ahead-of-their-time — but I have always preferred Abbey Road. As with below (you’ll see what it is), I first heard it on a plane. I now own it on CD, and I listened to it yesterday — for what seems like the first time, properly. The bass lines sounded impeccable, it sounded like The Beatles were actually in the room singing ‘Because’, The Abbey Road Medley was better than it was before (a feat I thought impossible!)! Just, wow!

DID YOU KNOW? The last song The Beatles recorded together was ‘The End’ (the second-to-last track on AR, if you count ‘Her Majesty’ as a proper track), rather fittingly. Apparently it was pretty much the only session after John got together with Yoko that he attended without her (according to Geoff Emerick).

BEST SONGS: ‘Come T Just do yourself a favour and listen to the entire album.

2. Rubber Soul

rubber soul

Words (not even THE word – pun intended) cannot explain my love for this album. I heard this dead early in my Beatles fandom — only a month after I bought my first album, 1. As I said above, I first heard this on a plane. I hadn’t heard any of the songs before (excepting ‘Norwegian Wood’), and was I in for a treat! Some of the band’s most obscure numbers quickly became some of my favourites. And let’s just say it changed my life almost as much as 1 did. It’s my goal, in fact, to cover the entirety of this album. So far, I’ve done ‘The Word’, and I should be doing ‘I’m Looking Through You’ next.

DID YOU KNOW? The undistorted, cropped version of the cover (possibly my favourite picture of The Beatles) resurfaced after over 47 years early last year. It is still unknown whether it is genuine, but I like to think it is.

BEST SONGS: See ‘Best Songs’ for Abbey Road — or in other words (coincidentally, ‘The Word’ is playing), do yourself a favour and listen to the entire album.

And now for number one (drum roll please, Ringo)…

1. Revolver

Revolver

From the ‘one, two, three, four’ mutterings of ‘Taxman’ to the trippy piano outro of ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’, Revolver is undoubtedly a masterpiece. And in my opinion, it’s The Beatles’ best album. I first listened to this album (after being mind-blown by ‘I’m Only Sleeping’ two months earlier) in February, after bribing myself with it as a treat at the end of a particularly probing school day. And I was hooked. But nothing — nothing in this world AT ALL — quite affected me like a casual listening to my mono 1st-edition LP of the above one Tuesday evening. About halfway through ‘I’m Only Sleeping’, something hit me. An intense feeling of insane, euphoric love. That emotion continued through the rest of the album, whether it be to the acidic overdrive of ‘She Said She Said’ (my favourite Beatles song), to the clavichord in ‘For No One’, the chorusing in ‘Yellow Submarine’, to the tight, harmonised ‘oohs’ in ‘Here, There and Everywhere’. Of course I had thought before that The Beatles were the best thing that ever happened to the music world, or maybe even the world in general if I was feeling particularly ambitious. But it was only then for the first time that I actually knew it.

DID YOU KNOW? Suggested names for Revolver involved AbracadabraBeatles on Safari, Magic Circles and After Geography. Revolver was decided on three weeks before the release.

BEST SONGS: I’m not even going to tell you to do yourself a favour. It’s essential to your existence that you listen to this album. Every single song on this album is mind-blowing, IMO. Every. Single. Song.

 

So there you go — that’s my opinion. And sorry, that was insanely long (and I’ve been writing this for nearly two hours). But I hope you read it, and I promise I won’t go that long again. Have a fab rest of your day, wherever you are, and good day sunshine! 🙂

My Beatles Record Collection Pt. 2 – ‘A Hard Day’s Night’

My 'A Hard Day's Night' LP. Also my LP of the album which has the cover that serves as the background for this blog.

My ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ LP. Also my LP of the album which has the cover that serves as the background for this blog.

Hey Bulldog (well, it has to go first sometimes)/Jude/all who care to read,

Only one more week of Term 3 left (then just one more term ’till the end of the year)! And yet more beautiful weather in good ol’ Adelaide! After being out and about, and then making considerable progress on my song (more on that later), I haven’t gotten around to posting on here until 5:00 on a Sunday night. Sorry.

But anyway, it’s ‘My Beatles Record Collection’ time again! And yes, I have noticed that a lot of my posts lately have been slightly self-centred, and I will try and un-self-centre them in the holidays. But anyway, it’s a month since I did With The Beatles (the earliest record in my collection), so now it’s time for the next record (as far as The Beatles’ chronology goes) – A Hard Day’s Night.

Unlike my With The Beatles, my A Hard Day’s Night is not some first-edition foreign-pressed mono LP. My A Hard Day’s Night is only an Australian stereo re-pressing (like two other of my records – my first-pressings and re-pressings roughly split about half-and-half). But here’s some background info:

In Australia, The Beatles were (obviously) released on Parlophone until Apple Corps. entered the picture. But (I’m not sure if this is the case elsewhere) re-pressings of Parlophone-released Beatles albums were still released on Parlophone after 1968. But they weren’t released on the black-and-yellow label (or even the special Australian black-and-silver label) – they were released on something known as the ‘orange label’.

Dun dun DUNNNN....

Dun dun DUNNNN….

The ‘orange label’ was used for re-pressings from 1969 to the early 1980s, and is featured on several records in my collection (including my Beatles Box – yes, mine is released on Parlophone, not Readers’ Digest. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, go Google it). As far as I know, it was used in Australia only. After studying this website (The Beatles’ Australian Records Labelography), the above appears to have been pressed in either 1969 or 1979.

‘Orange label’ records are okay, but I am on the definite look-out for first-edition versions (excepting the Box – that is first edition) of all the ‘orange labels’ I have. Why? The ‘orange labels’ are very flimsy, as Australian records from the ’70s became of a lesser quality than their ’60s counterparts. Apparently this is because many of the record factories went across the ditch to New Zealand, so all the LPs produced locally are thin and sensitive and don’t work too well. Fortunately, there are barely any scratches on this one, so it actually plays better than I thought (though it still crackles more than my thicker ones). But I’ll shut up now and upload some pictures so you can all see for yourselves (please excuse the quality – lighting isn’t too fab):

The back - complete with the original sleeve notes! But alas, no backflaps...

The back – complete with the original sleeve notes! But alas, no backflaps…

Yes, it's in stereo. You may notice that the number that tells you what number in the pressing it is is not there. This is true for all Australian Beatles records - they are seemingly set out differently to their British counterparts.

Yes, it’s in stereo. You may notice that the number that tells you what number in the pressing it is is not there. This is true for all Australian Beatles records – they are seemingly set out differently to their British counterparts.

Told ya' it was Aussie! Well, to be exact, it's New South Welsh... Considerably up north from here.

Told ya’ it was Aussie! Well, to be exact, it’s New South Welsh… Considerably up north from here.

The cover without the plastic slip over the top. You probably can't see it in this picture, but the cover is actually made from a different kind of cardboard to the original pressings.

The cover without the plastic slip over the top. You probably can’t see it in this picture, but the cover is actually made from a different kind of cardboard to the original pressings.

This was taken in an attempt to show you how flimsy the record is, but it doesn't really work unless I compare it with one of my first pressings (and I can't be bothered). But you get the picture. And you can go behind the scenes of 'AYNITB' if you look extra carefully at the laptop screen.

This was taken in an attempt to show you how flimsy the record is, but it doesn’t really work unless I compare it with one of my first pressings (and I can’t be bothered). But you get the picture. And you can go behind the scenes of ‘AYNITB’ if you look extra carefully at the laptop screen.

Side 2 of the record, top view.

Side 2 of the record, top view.

So there you go – my A Hard Day’s Night in a…cardboard box! 😉

I updated my iPad to iOS8 on Friday! And yes – those of you who know me IRL will know I completely avoided updating to iOS7, so I’m being slightly hypocritical by liking it so much, but stuff that! My favourite bit of iOS7/8 (it was a 7 feature, but I only got it with 8) is iTunes Radio. I’ve been listening to The Beatles channel all weekend! Did you know that The Beatles are the only artist to have their own proper channel, as compared to an ‘artist’ channel?

And I’ve made some more progress with a song I’ve been trying to write! As you may or may not know, I’m an aspiring alt. rock singer/songwriter/muso, under the alter-ego name of Sadie of Kirkcaldy (‘Sexy Sadie’ and ‘Cry Baby Cry’ mashup). Up until now, I’ve only done Beatles covers, and now I’ve made some progress with my own song! I can’t upload it on here now – a) it’s not finished; and b) it’s not on Soundcloud, which is the only way I can upload it here – but I’m fairly sure the song’ll be called ‘Whimsy’, and it uses a children’s xylophone (yes, you read right – but it actually sounds really good) and an acoustic capo-ed guitar (played in E with D-major chords), and I will eventually add melody/harmony vocals, a lead guitar and some kind of percussion. I wish I could upload the template for it that I made earlier today, but sadly I can’t; I promise ‘All You Need Is The Beatles’ will be the first place I’ll share it, though!

As I said above, only one more week until holidays! Then you’ll get posts every three – or even two, if I can be bothered – days! Yay – maybe then I’ll get some of my ideas down before I forget them! And this time next week I’ll have seen ‘Looking Through A Glass Onion’, which I am really looking forward to (thank you to my godparents for buying me a ticket for my birthday!) But until then, good day sunshine 🙂

 

Some Beatles demos/alternate takes/sessions to feast your ears on…

Taken in the Austrian Alps - made me smile :-) !

Taken in the Austrian Alps – made me smile 🙂 !

 

 Recently – whilst completing a science assignment – I decided to stop listening to Rubber Soul for the third time in a row (I still love it dearly, but I didn’t want to get sick of it – I’d debate whether that’s possible, though 🙂 …) and do some YouTubing as a means of finding something new to listen to (I don’t buy much music on iTunes – prefer it on vinyl). And under my ‘recommended videos’ thing(y) was a video containing a compilation of Magical Mystery Tour/White Album era demos. I gave it a listen, and then I found even more of these videos under ‘suggested videos’! So yeah, it did take two nights to finish my science, but I found a really cool idea for a post! I absolutely love listening to Beatles demos – I feel a little special, hearing a completely different (and often rare) version of such familiar songs that I know and love dearly. Obviously, though, not all such recordings are rare – as we all know, the Anthology project made some of these relatively well-known. So this post pays homage to those bits and pieces John, Paul, George and Ringo may or may not have wanted us to hear – enjoy!

‘The Beatles’ Home Demos: A Hard Day’s Night and Rubber Soul

‘If I Fell’: Crappy sound quality, but that is the case with most home demos (due to primitive recording equipment). I like this version, and it proves that John was good with falsetto notes, even in the early Beatles days.

‘World Without Love’: Funnily enough, my local classic hits station (what else would I listen to? Actually, I might listen to Triple J – the local indie rock station – at some point, ‘cos I like that sort of thing too) plays the Peter and Gordon version of this song all the time, but it took me a good year-and-a-half of Beatles fandom to work out it was a Lennon/McCartney (namely, McCartney) composition! Yeah – of course I knew that most (if not all) of Peter and Gordon’s songs were written by Paul ‘cos Peter was Peter Asher (Jane Asher’s brother) – but I cannot believe I did not clue on earlier. I like this version more than the original, I have to say – probably because Paul’s singing it… 🙂

‘One And One Is Two’: Never heard this song before, but it’s groovy! I like the way Paul sings it…

‘We Can Work It Out’: Ahh – back to actual Beatles songs again! I really like the folksiness of the original, but this version is still folky and still really cool. In fact, the official version of this was just on the radio (spooky!)…

‘She Said, She Said’

Although I am forever saying that I do not have one favourite Beatles song (if an ever-changing list of about 100 tunes counts, well I do), I would cite this one as top dog if my life depended on it. As I said in my ‘Favourite Beatles Song’ post, I love this song, so I find the above very, very cool! Two completely different versions from the psychedelic masterpiece that ended Side One of my favourite Beatles album (Revolver)!

Demo One: This could not sound more different than the original, but I still love it! John was still clearly working on the lyrics (He said//I know what it’s like to be dead…), and Paul appears to be with John at the time (hence dialogue at end). Writing session at Kenwood, perhaps?

Demo Two: This is my favourite out of the two. John had mostly completed the lyrics by this point, and appears to practising it. I love how the acoustic guitar sounds so trippy, even though it likely hasn’t been edited – John had a semi-acoustic (meaning he can amp it up – I, too, have one), so I wonder if he put a pedal on it, or something? I’d love to know what he put on it, if he did anything… Oh, and there is a little bit of language in this bit – such things don’t bother me in the slightest, but just thought I should cover myself.

‘Revolution’

Wow – those people who think that John is no good as a guitarist need to listen to this! That riff at the beginning is incredibly hard to play – and I should know, ‘cos I play guitar myself! And I love John’s vocals in this, too – need I say more?

‘Something’

‘Something in the way she moves//attracts me like a pomegranate!’ Ha, ha 🙂 – need I say more? Also, George and John making up more of those random lyrics…in need for another smiley 🙂 !

Oh, and I didn’t know George could sing like that! Wow, George, wow! Normally, his anyway-gorgeous voice is quite smooth and sweet, but on this, he rocks really hard! And of course, I love this song anyway – in fact, it was this that taught me that George wrote songs, too…

A Random Bloopers Reel

This one – unlike the clips above – is a medley of all sorts of bloopers, in no kind of order whatsoever. It’s very funny, though – lots of laughing (pity a certain version of ‘And Your Bird Can Sing’ ain’t on there) and jokes 🙂 ! Oh, and I s’pose I should cover myself over usage of ‘language’, too – it’s mostly from Paul (naughty Paul 🙂 !)!

‘You Can’t Do That’/’Love Me Do’/’Gimme Some Truth’/’She Said, She Said’ (Get Back sessions)

Not all of the Get Back sessions were shown in Let It Be. ‘Of course they weren’t,’ you’re probably thinking. ‘Otherwise we’d have proper of footage of George leaving the band, and we’d probably also have footage of Yoko screaming sufficient enough to make us deaf.’ Well, yeah – you’re right – but what many people don’t know is that The Beatles recorded a lot more material than first apparent within that period of time – whether that be alternate versions of past songs, or the beginnings of songs that will eventually end up on solo albums. The songs I chose to post were swamped-down versions of ‘You Can’t Do That’ and ‘Love Me Do’, that sound so damn cool (!), a version of ‘Gimme Some Truth’, a song that would appear on John’s 1971 masterpiece Imagine, and that song I keep on rambling about – ‘She Said, She Said’ (+ a version of ‘She Came In Through The Bathroom Window), the Get Back edition. Apparently they also did ‘Norwegian Wood’ – can’t find it, though… 😦

‘I’m So Tired’…sung by Paul! Oh, and ‘Get Back’/’Yesterday’…sung by John!

Yep, I’m serious; Paul is singing a song off the White Album, which – I might add – was written about Yoko. Paul singing a love song for Yoko – hmm. As I’ve said before, I really like Yoko (excepting the screaming) and have tremendous respect for her, but we all know that Paul did not feel the same way… But anyway (who he is singing about aside), his version is really quite good. In fact, it’s really good – gives John a run for his money. At the end of the day, though, John wins for me 🙂 ! As for ‘Get Back’ – oh my God! This might just be my favourite version of this song – especially love the tempo, John’s voice and Ringo’s fills. When I listened to this to test its eligibility for this post, all I could do was stomp my foot, clap along, dance and air-guitar along – that is all I need to say… And ‘Yesterday’ – John fooling about with a famously-Paul-only song. Sure, all the Macca Maniacs will not like it at all, but I think it’s funny! By the way, videos one & two are from Get Back, too.

‘Cry Baby Cry’

As I repeatedly state in various places on this blog, my favourite Beatles songs change from day to day. But ‘Cry Baby Cry’ is a bit like ‘She Said, She Said’ – it always remains somewhat near (if not at) the top of my list. In fact, it was the first song I played on my steel-stringed guitar, and I can still remember listening to it for the first time earlier this year, and being completely blown away. I especially love the almost proto-metal electric-guitar version near the end, with John screaming out the vocals in a, well, proto-metal-type way – a complete contrast to the folky official version (which I still love). Sounds really cool however it is played, let’s just say!

‘Yes It Is’

a) ‘One, two, three, bread.’ Deserves a smiley, Johnny 🙂 ! Next time I have to do a count-in, I know what I’m going to do…

b) I know I posted the Anthology version of this song (a mash-up of takes 2 & 14) in an earlier post, but here is the complete evolution of that Beatles song that everyone sadly forgets (except those who know it, of course). I love this song (okay – I love every Beatles song, with the exception of ‘Revolution 9’ and ‘Wild Honey Pie’ – which I appreciate at the very least), so I find this absolutely fab!

‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’

‘You cheat, tangerinetrees99,’ you’re probably thinking. ‘That’s not rare at all! It’s off blooming Anthology!’ Yes, and I am well aware of that, but I really wanted it in this post. And it is an alternate version of the official, after all, isn’t it? But anyway, I swear I heard this version of ‘WMGGW’ far before I heard the White Album edition. In fact, I prefer this to the Eric Clapton guitar-god version everyone knows. I love everything about this demo – the acoustic-ness of the whole thing, the fact it is in G minor (as opposed to A minor), just – well – everything! Thank you, George, for recording such a gorgeous version of this song.

Paul sings John a very sweet tribute

Aww! How sweet of Paul? I like his versions, too – I also like what he said before he started… I won’t say too much about this one, apart from the fact that it made me a little emotional – you’ll have to watch it yourself… 🙂

So there we have it – an incredibly long post (I’ll try and be shorter next week), but I hope it was all worth it. Enjoy listening to things you may or may not have heard before – but nonetheless (whether you’ve heard them or not), it’ll make for a fab listening marathon! Hope you have a good rest of your day (whichever hemisphere you’re in), and I’ll leave you with this really funny clip of 1965 Christmas record outtakes, which I guarantee will have you hysterically laughing by the minute-mark (excusing one or two grotty jokes, that might or might not bother you – I’m in the latter, so just covering myself again… Still, it is really funny!)! Good day sunshine 🙂

 

LOOK WHAT CAME IN THE MAIL YESTERDAY!! (a.k.a. Thank You Mr. Postman Pt. 3)

Here it is - the sacred BluRay!

Here it is – the sacred BluRay!

I was going to post yesterday, about a Lennon-y happening in Adelaide that my mum discovered via her Facebook Newsfeed, but something stopped me from doing so (not that I’m complaining!). My mum was driving me home from school, and was telling me that she had checked our mailbox (which is usually my job, but she had done it earlier that day). I asked her if there was anything for me – I wasn’t expecting her answer, as the expected arrival date (according to Amazon – where I ordered it) for what came was August 4th. So, Mum implied that there was something for me, but it was addressed to her. I quickly clued on – my beautiful A Hard Day’s Night BluRay had landed in our letterbox! I squealed (as you do), and as soon as we arrived home, I ran through the house and found a cardboard box on our dining-room table. I reached into the box, and the above package came out. And that package is now going to receive a bit of a review from me!

THE PACKAGING

The British edition of A Hard Day’s Night – unlike its Australian counterpart – comes in a fancy slip-case, not unlike the ones that come with the official Apple Corps releases of Help! and Yellow Submarine. The words ‘THE BEATLES’ and ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ are embossed, and stick out in comparison to the rest of the box. On the front cover, there is a famous still from the ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’ scene, in which they are chased around London. As many people will know, the cover was changed a few times, for which I am glad. If you have not seen the original cover (designed by some graphic design franchise called La Boca), be thankful – it was absolutely ATROCIOUS. But back onto the design that was used – on the back of slip-case, there is – obviously – the blurb, the credits, a list of the nine (nine!) special features and all the jargon-like information to do with the way it appears on the screen. Amongst that, though, is two rows of pictures from the A Hard Day’s Night album-cover photoshoot – however, some of these pictures are outakes that never actually appeared on the cover! Inside the slip-case, there’s nothing special (apart from the disc!) – just a standard BluRay cover, with the same appearance as the case it came in. Sadly, the BluRay does not come with a booklet, like Apple Corps releases of the other Beatles films and the US release of the above, but I don’t really mind. Oh, and the case feels nice, too – it seems almost waxy.

 

THE DISC

Oh my – A Hard Day’s Night in HD; oh my, does it look good! I used to watch AHDN through an unofficial, not-particularly-fabulous quality YouTube video, so seeing it so sharp was quite an experience. And I swear that certain parts of the film were cut out on YouTube, meaning that – despite the fact I have seen the film a good five times – last night was the first time I had seen it in full! I haven’t checked out the special features yet, but they look really good – I especially like the sound of the In Their Own Voices thing (’64 interviews with John, Paul, George and Ringo + behind-the-scenes footage) and the interview with Mark Lewisohn (the author of Tune In – or in other words, a keen Beatleologist). So to sum the above paragraph all up, I thought that film was fab enough the first times I saw it – now that I’ve seen it in HD, I love it even more!

Here some pictures of my copy – excuse the quality, as it is growing dark:

The side

The side

The back of the slip-case

The back of the slip-case

The BluRay case

The BluRay case

Inside the case, where the magic is kept!

Inside the case, where the magic is kept!

So as you can see, I’m very, very, VERY happy with the beautiful A Hard Day’s Night, especially now that I have my own copy (it has been out-of-print Down Under for about ten years)! And if you don’t already have a new remastered copy of this fab film, make sure you get one – you won’t be disappointed!

And as for that Lennon-y happening, there is an art exhibition of official prints of John’s work in Adelaide at the moment 🙂 ! I don’t really have time to write about it now, but I will be visiting in on Saturday thus will write about it then. For now, though, here is the link to their website, and be sure check out the exhibit if you’re a fellow Adelaidean! I knew that Johnny was a talented artist (for goodness’ sake – he went to Art School!), but I never knew he was that good until I saw the pictures on that website. Wow, John – you really were a genius (not that we didn’t all know that already)!

Oh, and I ordered  Let It Be off Ebay last night, so I will soon own all five Beatles films! I am really looking forward to seeing it, though – I know most people would find it depressing and boring (I might find it the former, as the band is falling apart – but I really still want to see it), but it sounds really interesting. And it includes the Rooftop Concert – come on; who doesn’t love that?! Until the weekend, though, good day sunshine from me! 🙂

John and Paul: The David Bailey Photoshoot

 

Here's some Beatles street-art I found in Town - in a little alleyway off Rundle Street, next to a Beatnik-ish record shop and the Palace Nova cinema, if you know Adelaide.

Here’s some Beatles street-art I found in Town – in a little alleyway off Rundle Street, next to a Beatnik-ish record shop and the Palace Nova cinema, if you know Adelaide.

(A close-up.) Sadly, some person decided to vandalise poor Paul, John and Ringo - at least they left George alone!

(A close-up.) Sadly, some person decided to vandalise poor Paul, John and Ringo – at least they left George alone!

 

Hey Jude/Bulldog/everyone reading this,

Today is my last day of school holidays – 😦 – and I’m wearing my Yellow Submarine t-shirt, plus listening to Mind Games for the first time. I know many people aren’t huge fans of John’s 1973 release, but I really like it, so far! Thanks, Johnny. But anyway, I wasn’t too sure what to do today (I have a big list of potential posts written up, which I consult when I don’t know what to do – however, there are TOO MANY ideas!), so – as you can probably guess after reading my bracket-enclosed notes – I consulted my list. And I found this idea! As many people reading this will know, David Bailey is a famous photographer from the 1960s, who’s done people such as Mick Jagger, Jean Shrimpton, Kate Moss, Jude Law, Oasis (those copycats!) and Bill Wyman (yes, they’re all either models or Rolling Stones – except for Jude Law and Oasis – but Google isn’t being very helpful). And being such a famous photographer, it’s only natural that he photographed the best songwriting duo in the history of the world (in my opinion, anyway…)! On the twenty-first of January, 1965, these beautiful shots of John and Paul were taken in Bailey’s London studio. Bailey has famously said that he dislikes The Beatles (apparently The Stones are a-gazillion times better, according to him – I’m obviously on The Beatles’ side, but I like The Stones, too), and has called John a ‘f**ker’ and Paul ‘the nicest guy in the world’ (sarcastically, I assume) in recent interviews, so I didn’t think too much of him at first. But he is a very talented photographer, and has taken some of the best John/Paul pictures ever (and an incredible amount for someone who apparently hates The Beatles), so I’ll ignore his views. So here we are – enjoy!

 

John and Paul, together

Don't they look gorgeous? John looks very attractive in these photos!

Don’t they look gorgeous? John looks very attractive in these photos!

I love the hands in this one - I'm re-doing my bedroom at the moment, and I'm going to print out a couple of these 'proof-sheets' to put up, somewhere. This is going to be one of them!

I love the hands in this one – I’m re-doing my bedroom at the moment, and I’m going to print out a couple of these ‘proof-sheets’ to put up, somewhere. This is going to be one of them!

Slightest bit of tension here, but that seems to disappear...

Slightest bit of tension here, but that seems to disappear…

I think everyone knows this picture - this is the main focus of my gorgeous JL/PM tee, which I now know is a David Bailey proof-sheet! McLennon believers also seem to think that this photo proves that John and Paul were secret lovers - hmm...

I think everyone knows this picture – this is the main focus of my gorgeous JL/PM tee, which I now know is a David Bailey proof-sheet! McLennon believers also seem to think that this photo proves that John and Paul were secret lovers – hmm…

It's hard to explain what I feel when I see this - it just conveys this unspoken understanding and closeness between the two. Maybe I'm just reading too far into things, but does anyone else feel the same?

It’s hard to explain what I feel when I see this – it just conveys this unspoken understanding and closeness between the two. Maybe I’m just reading too far into things, but does anyone else feel the same?

 

Just John

 

Oh my, John - oh my! I officially proclaim John Winston Lennon the most attractive man to have ever lived! :-)

Oh my, John – oh my! I officially proclaim John Winston Lennon the most attractive man to have ever lived! 🙂

Standing up with perfect posture!

Standing up with perfect posture!

Not-perfect-posture this time, but what does that matter?!

Not-perfect-posture this time, but what does that matter?!

 

Just Paul

 

Paul looks good in a kaftan! Must have had a change of clothes...

Paul looks good in a kaftan! Must have had a change of clothes…

Paul with a ladder!

Paul with a ladder! Can’t really imagine him being handy, but then, I can’t do that with John, George or Ringo, either!

This is supposedly taken by Bailey, but I've never seen it before (not that necessarily means anything). It does look Bailey-esque, though, so I'll trust the website I sourced it from...

This is supposedly taken by Bailey, but I’ve never seen it before (not that necessarily means anything). It does look Bailey-esque, though, so I’ll trust the website I sourced it from…

 

Oh, and…

 

Aww! :-)

Aww! 🙂

 

So there you have it – David Bailey’s photos of John and Paul in a nutshell (that cliché’s getting old, tangerinetrees99), if you like!

Oh, and if you live in the UK (not sure if I’ve got any UK readers), today’s the day to go rushing out to buy A Hard Day’s Night! And talking of AHDN, GUESS WHAT SHIPPED ON SATURDAY?!?! Sorry – bad grammar – but I think that announcement is worthy of capitals! It shipped a few days early (I thought it would ship today), and the expected arrival date is next Monday. Look out for a ‘Thank You Mr. Postman’ post, but somehow, I expect it might be titled ‘GUESS WHAT CAME IN THE MAIL?!?!?!’ ! I’ll do a review on the BluRay, too, so it won’t be too much fangirling.

Something Beatle-y came in the mail today, too – a Beatles clock that I ordered off Etsy, after seeing it in Melbourne back a couple of weeks ago! I won’t do a ‘TYMP’ post, ‘cos a) I need to assemble the clock hands, and b) it’s not original 1960s memorabilia (as everything else I’ve posted about is), but here’s a picture:

clock

Oh, and on Friday, I’m going to a Beatles tribute called the White Album Concert! Four renowned Aussie musos (Chris Cheney, Phil Jamieson, Tim Rodgers and Josh Pyke) are coming together to tour around Australia singing The Beatles – a.k.a. The White Album – in full (including, erm, ‘Revolution #9’)! I believe that they’ve already done their Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney dates, and that their shows in Canberra and here – Adelaide – are sold out (we got presale tickets back in April!), but if you live in Woollongong (a place in New South Wales, if you’re not familiar with Australia) or Perth, you can still get seats. For those of you that live elsewhere (nationally or internationally), you can read all about the show plus buy their CD from their 2009 tour here (you can also buy the tickets if you – by chance – live in one of the above places). I’ll be sure to write up on it on Saturday!

So have a lovely rest of your day, and good day sunshine! 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Things We Polled Today…

A lovely picture of John and Paul!

A lovely picture of John and Paul! Don’t they look sweet? 🙂

Well – I haven’t done a poll in a while, have I? I also have some other things to write about today (i.e. Ron Howard’s upcoming Beatles doco – for which I cannot wait!), but to start off with – here’s a poll! It’s titled ‘Which Beatles’ period is your favourite’ (as you will see further down), and Option One will be ‘the early years’ – the Hamburg/Cavern Club Era (1960) ’till the A Hard Day’s Night sessions (1964), which includes Pete Best/Stu Sutcliffe, the ‘Love Me Do’/’P.S. I Love You’ sessions, the marathon 12-hour Please Please Me session and the With The Beatles sessions, plus the filming of A Hard Day’s Night and their Australian tour. Option Two will be the ‘middle years’ – the Beatles For Sale (late 1964) sessions ’till the Magical Mystery Tour/Yellow Submarine sessions (1968 – there’s a slight overlap, here, ‘cos both the film and album Yellow Submarine fit in with the psychedelia of Sgt. Pepper/ Magical Mystery Tour, but were recorded around the time of ‘Lady Madonna’, which is considered as a part of their back-to-basics-rock-and-roll late material. I consider Yellow to be middle-period, but that’s only my opinion), which includes ‘Ticket To Ride’/’Yes It Is’, the album/film/single Help! (which includes classics such as the title track, ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’ and – of course – ‘Yesterday’), Shea Stadium, Rubber Soul, ‘Paperback Writer’/’Rain’, the groundbreaking Revolver, the Sgt. Pepper sessions, plus (not-so-positive bits) the introduction of pot/LSD, the decision to stop touring (not that was necessarily a bad thing…) and the ‘Jesus remark’ (which was taken completely out of context). And then, the final option will be the ‘late years’, spanning from the ‘Lady Madonna’ sessions ’till the break-up – this involves India, introduction of Yoko and Linda, the White Album sessions, ‘Hey Jude’/’Revolution’, the Get Back/Let It Be sessions and Abbey Road, plus the mounds of arguments and the split ( 😦 ). If I had to choose, I would vote for the ‘middle years’ – my favourite albums (Revolver, Help!, Beatles For Sale and Rubber Soul) were all recorded in that period – plus the songs I favour – and (not that it matters) I think they looked the best around that period (not that they were bad-looking at any period – except for maybe Paul’s Let It Be beard…)! Oh, and one word: PSYCHEDELIA! But this isn’t a place for me to vote, ‘cos I’m putting it to you. So please choose, and I’d love to see which period is the most popular amongst the people who’ve seen past this large block of text and voted!

 

(And now for some more…)

As most Beatlemaniacs will have heard by now, acclaimed director and actor Ron Howard is both directing and producing a documentary on The Beatles’ touring years (1960 – 1966), which is scheduled for release in late-2015! Ron Howard (who – amongst other things – starred as Richie in Happy Days, plus is the creator behind Parenthood) is a self-proclaimed Beatlemaniac himself, and is being joined by Nigel Sinclair (who produced George Harrison: Living In The Material World); the two (according to Rolling Stone) have been granted access to the Apple Corps archives (I can only dream!), and are sourcing footage/photos/material from fans. For more information, here is the link to the article on The Beatles’ official website, which involves information on how to submit your material for the doco (anyone here got any??). You can find Rolling Stone‘s article (the most informative yet) on the upcoming feature here. And Sky News Australia’s two-bobs’-worth is here – whilst short, it contains a cool news-clip about the event! I cannot wait for this to be released, and I’ll be making sure I’m at the pre-viewing if it makes it to cinemas.

As for some other Beatle-y news, The Grammys’ Beatles tribute has been nominated for six Emmy awards! Let’s hope it wins some, ‘cos (in my opinion) watching Paul and Ringo re-unite is much more interesting than binge-watching Game Of Thrones (not that I’ve ever watched it)… And A Hard Day’s Night has been released on Australian iTunes stores (as of the 9th of this month), but it’s rated M. Why M?? I get that John snorts a bottle of coke (the cola kind…) in the train (‘But they hadn’t even done pot at this point, let alone cocaine,’ I protest), there are a few jokes of a sexual nature (Paul’s comment to the effect of, ‘He [Grandfather] could be in an orgy by now!’, John’s ‘Please can I have one to surge with?’ comment, what John and the girl are hinting at in the ‘she looks more like me than I do’ scene, and the stamp collection), and of course, the smoking – but M? Really?? I also read that the Australian BluRay isn’t particularly good, so I’m glad I got my UK export! Talking of my UK export…IT’S BEING SHIPPED ON MONDAY! I absolutely cannot wait for it to come!

Oh, and a big thank you to my good friend (you know who you are) for recommending an interesting book to me, earlier this year – I just finished it yesterday! But what book am I referring to, you ask? When We Wake, a dystopian novel written by New Zealander-come-Australian Karen Healey! The story is about a sixteen-year-old girl living in 2027 Melbourne named Tegan, who’s about to go on a climate-change-action protest with her best friend Alex and her boyfriend-as-of-the-night-before Dalmar. However, a sniper intervenes, and Tegan is shot dead. Tegan had donated her body to science some time before she died, though. She wakes up (as the first successful cryonics – the process of freezing someone who is dead, and then proceeding to try and revive them – patient) in 2128, and soon enough, she finds herself in the middle of the paparazzi, a medicinal-drug-smuggling plot, a secret – and possibly corrupt – government operation and a devout Christian cult, who want her dead. And of course, Tegan is a hardcore Beatlemaniac – her favourite is Ringo, but the majority of Beatles references are somewhat related to John 🙂 ; yay for Johnny! Sadly, though, George isn’t mentioned… However, I really enjoyed this read, and you can buy your own copy here. Again, thank you, my friend, and hope you’re enjoying the holidays!

And one more thing… if you haven’t already noticed, I’ve changed my sidebar widgets slightly! Please check out my profile, and see if you can guess what songs I’m punning on. Good day sunshine 🙂

Thank You Mr. Postman! Pt. 2

 

The latest edition to my Beatle-y merchandise collection!

The latest edition to my Beatle-y merchandise collection!

 

Rubber Soul – John, Paul, George and Ringo’s sixth album, released in Britain on the 3rd of December, 1965; what does it mean to you? To me, it means a few things – a) it was the first Beatles studio album I purchased, b) I remember listening to it on a plane flight from Melbourne to Adelaide (where it snowed, yesterday – not in my part (where it stayed just about 8 degrees all day), but it still snowed!) just under a year ago, and c) to me, it marks when the later years of The Beatles’ career start. But now, it means something more – ‘cos look what came in the mail at about 11 o’clock (AM – obviously…) today! The above book is a Rubber Soul ‘song album’ – a magazine that contains eight ‘already standard songs’ off the album, plus three pages of ‘fabulous photos’! I ordered it off Ebay on Monday (Ringo’s birthday!), and (since it only had to come down from Queensland – the state at the very top of Australia, if you’re not familiar with the geography of my country) it has arrived surprisingly quickly! I had a flip through the pages, and it looks as though most of the songs are in the correct key signature, so I shouldn’t have to do too much transposing to bring them up/down to the way The Fab Four played them! The songs noted in the book are – in case you can’t read the listing on the picture (it would appear quite small on, say, an iPhone) – ‘Michelle’, ‘Norwegian Wood’, ‘Nowhere Man’, ‘Girl’, ‘Wait’, ‘If I Needed Someone’, ‘Drive My Car’ and ‘Think For Yourself’, and are printed in that order. In the middle of the booklet is a double-page spread of pictures of The Beatles taken at various points in 1965, and just over 3/4ths of the way through, there is a image-page dedicated to the Shea Stadium gig. So as you can see, I’m quite pleased with my latest purchase!

Just one more thing before I show you some pictures of the book – the mystery of when the book was published, as this is not apparent at first view. When I purchased the book, I was under the impression that it was printed in 1965, but as I will show a little further down, the book was being sold at a price of 80 cents. In Australia in 1965, our currency was the Australian pound/penny – it continued to be so until the 14th of February, 1966 (when it was all decimalised, and we ended up with the Australian dollar/cent). Interestingly, until the release of Revolver, Australian Beatles releases were always a couple of months behind the UK. Because of this, Rubber Soul (the last record to have a delayed release date here) was put on shelves on the 17th of February, 1966 – only three days after decimalisation. I’d assume that my book was released around the same time as the album, so my guess is that it was released some time between February (the date of both decimalisation – hence the price of 80 cents – and the Australian release of Rubber Soul) and August (the world release-date of Revolver – involving Australia for the first time…), 1966. I don’t think it could have been any later, ‘cos – as far as I can see – these ‘song albums’ were released with every LP (making the previous one out-of-print), the price would be too little for something even released in 1970s, and the pages look too old to be something much later. But now, I’ll stop writing, and show you my pictures; enjoy!

The '80 cents' thing I was talking about (off the back cover - it was scribbled off the front, as you may have noted from my image at the top of the post).

The ’80 cents’ thing I was talking about (off the back cover – the price was scribbled off the front, as you may have noted from my image at the top of the post).

The publishing information - interesting from the point of view of an Australian Beatlemaniac...

The publishing information – interesting from the point of view of an Australian Beatlemaniac, but worth a look…

A page of music - 'Nowhere Man', to be exact. This image might be illegal (I don't know), so please look at my 'Disclaimers' post if you are thinking of suing me (though I doubt some Apple Corps. official would bother to read such blogs)...

A page of music – ‘Nowhere Man’, to be exact. This image might be illegal (I don’t know), so please look at my ‘Disclaimers’ post if you are thinking of suing me (though I doubt some Apple Corps. official would bother to read this)…

A double-spread of pictures (yay!)! Oh, and just look at that picture of John in the right corner of the left-hand page - oh my, was he attractive :-) !

A double-spread of pictures (yay!)! Oh, and just look at that picture of John in the right corner of the left-hand page – oh my, was he attractive 🙂 !

Another page of music - 'Girl', this time. I love this song - it will definitely make my next 'Favourite Beatles Songs' post, and I can't believe it didn't feature on the first one!

Another page of music – ‘Girl’, this time. I love this song – it will definitely make my next ‘Favourite Beatles Songs’ post, and I can’t believe it didn’t feature on the first one!

The Shea Stadium pictures I was talking about, plus the last page of 'Drive My Car'.

The Shea Stadium pictures I was talking about, plus the last page of ‘Drive My Car’.

The last page - 'Think For Yourself', the song that turned me on to how good a songwriter George was! Note the different title font - it appears to have been used on both the first and last pages of music.

The last pages – ‘Think For Yourself’, the song that turned me on to how good a songwriter George was! Note the different title font – it appears to have been used on both the first and last pages of music.

So there you have it – an insider’s view of my latest Beatle-y thing! And now for a couple of other things…

A Hard Day’s Night might just make its way onto Australian big screens! I was giving The Beatles’ official website one of my weekly looks the other day, and I came across a page titled ‘A Hard Day’s Night Screenings Info’. I clicked on it – for no apparent reason (a glimmer of hope, perhaps?!) – and proceeded to read it. And, guess what? The article said (quote), “In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of its world premiere in London, The Beatles’ epoch-making music movie will have an extended run of screenings across the USA and the UK from 4 July 2014, with more global dates to be announced soon.” So this means that it might – just might – make its way Down Under, and, good gracious, would I be the happiest girl on Earth if it did! If you (like me) have an account on the website, make sure you ‘Favourite’ the page and keep your eyes peeled. If you don’t, however, I’ve posted the link here. But if you’re reading this in the US/UK, I’d assume you’ve already seen it – I’d love to hear what it was like!

(And finally…)

Today is a special day for me, because it marks exactly one year since I purchased my first Beatles album! About six months earlier (after becoming a casual fan three years before – this being revived again in 2012), my then-best-friend turned me on to The Beatles’ music (after a playing of ‘All You Need Is Love’ one school assembly), and we spent our lunch-breaks singing tunes such as ‘Eleanor Rigby’ (her favourite Beatles song) and ‘Hello Goodbye’ (my then-fave – it’s the first Beatles song I have exact memory of listening to, so it’s a little special to me), and talking about our favourite Beatles (hers was Paul, and – as you will have gathered – mine is John). There was only one problem, though – I thought my parents didn’t like The Fab Four (I was very, very wrong), so I was too afraid to tell them about my new-found passion. So – about six months later – I found myself making up elaborate plots that would allow me to purchase a Beatles album without my mother and father cluing on too much. I remember scouring iTunes – which, at the time, was selling 1 and Help! at discounted prices – to try and find an album that I could start out with. I decided up on 1 – at this time, of course, I had no knowledge of their studio albums (would you believe it – I though Abbey Road was a Rolling Stones album!), so I unwittingly ended up with their best-selling, 2000-released compilation (not that I care!). But anyway, I plotted for about two weeks, and finally, my ‘B-day’ had rolled along. I’d purchased an iTunes card a few days earlier (as part of my plot), and bought a few other songs to make myself appear a little less ‘suspicious’ (as I thought myself at the time). But my plan fell apart (thankfully!), when Mum ended up going through a newly-purchased flute music book to try and find some music to recommend (all a part of my plot), she also ended up discovering I was a rookie Beatlemaniac – and I discovered that she also liked their music! Since then, my love has only blossomed, so I reckon the decision I made that day was one of the best (if not the best) decision I have made in my life! It’s funny to think that, a year ago, I didn’t even know what The Beatles really looked like (that was unfortunate for me 🙂 ) or that George sang (I soon discovered he wrote, as ‘Something’ is on 1) some Beatles songs, but now (a year later), I can recite their entire discography off in a matter of seconds, and I could tell you really obscure facts, such as the month and year that John got his drivers’ licence in, and how old he was (he got it in February 1965, and he was 24-turning-25)! I reckon I’ll love The Beatles for the rest of my life – and to think it’s all down to an album I bought exactly one year ago, today! So (to conclude this last paragraph), I’ve posted 1 – that life-changing album, for me – below. If you’re already a Beatlemaniac (like I assume most people reading this are), have a listen – who would pass up an opportunity to listen to a certain band that changed the course of the world?!?! But if you’re a casual fan, or haven’t discovered The Fabs all that much, yet, why don’t you listen to this album, too? Once you have, I guarantee you that your life will never be the same – all down to four talented musicians/singers/songwriters that changed so many other lives, too. I salute you, John, Paul, George and Ringo! So here is that album that changed my life, and I’d like to think that it’ll help change many others, too:

 

So now, on this sunny afternoon (to quote The Kinks) that is also an extremely valid candidate for the coldest day in our long-cold-lonely Winter (to quote The Beatles), good day sunshine! 🙂