I went to see Courtney Barnett!

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Courtney Barnett

Last Thursday, I was lucky enough to see one of my favourite artists live; Courtney Barnett! She was playing a venue called The Gov, which is a bit famous in Adelaide. My parents bought me a ticket just under a day before the show, so thank you so much!

Me before the show

Me before the show

Courtney Barnett is an Australian indie singer, songwriter + guitarist. Her lyrics are marvelously witty and honest and funny, and she sings with her Australian accent. A lot of her songs are a little bit grungy, but a lot of them are softer, too. She and her partner Jen Cloher run an indie record label called Milk! Records. Courtney designs all her album art, too. She released her debut album, Sometimes I Sit and Think and Sometimes I Just Sit in March this year.

The Gov opened its doors at 7:30 and Mum + I arrived not long after. But as we were waiting, somebody walks past us and into the beer garden. And that somebody was Courtney! So after a few minutes, I plucked up my courage and went up to her. I introduced myself and told her that I’m a huge fan. She introduced me to her drummer, Dave, shook my hand, and asked if I was from Adelaide. Dave then took a picture of Courtney and me! They both said they hoped I would enjoy the show. Both Courtney and Dave were really nice, and it was amazing to meet someone I really look up to as an aspiring musician! A memorable start to a memorable night! Courtney actually watched the supports in the audience, which I thought was cool.

Courtney and me!

Courtney and me!

Soon after, the first support band started. They were called The Yabbies, and they were okay, but I thought the second support band were really good! They were called Teeth and Tongue, and played a certain style of half-synth-y, half-guitar-y indie pop which is just pleasing to the ears. Their frontwoman — Jessica Cornelius — also had great stage presence, which is always a plus. I loved dancing to their beats, and got some good photos of them, too.

Teeth and Tongue

Teeth and Tongue

Finally, at around 9:45, Courtney and her band came on! She launched into ‘Elevator Operator’, the first song on her new album, and sung the words in her signature Aussie voice. Everyone stood up, and I took prime position on top of a booth seat so I could see!

Courtney

Courtney!

Courtney and her band then played ‘Lance Jr’, a song from her first EP. ‘Lance Jr’ was in fact the first song of hers that I heard. Courtney then talked to the audience for a bit and played a few more songs from her latest album, like ‘Aqua Profunda!’, ‘Dead Fox’, ‘Small Poppies’ and ‘Nobody Really Cares If You Don’t Go To The Party’.

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A lot of people who go and see Courtney live comment on how her live performances are a bit heavier than the studio versions of her songs. And they’re right. Courtney, Dave and her bassist (a dude called Bones!) absolutely rocked The Gov! The walls and floors were quite literally vibrating! Her voice was a little bit sweeter live than it is on her studio songs — but then, she almost screamed a few of the songs live, too. There was such an air of excitement and energy buzzing throughout The Gov that night…

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Courtney then played a few more songs. One of these was the B-side of her latest single, ‘Depreston’, which is all about house-hunting in a suburb in Melbourne called Preston. (Courtney, who lives in Melbourne, often references the city in her songs.) She also played a song called ‘Kim’s Caravan’, which is about the decline of the Great Barrier Reef and climate change in general. ‘Kim’s Caravan’ is one of the softer songs on Sometimes I Sit…, but it certainly wasn’t live. Courtney’s guitar was feeding like mad during the outro, and it sounded awesome! After a bit over an hour, Courtney, Dave and Bones finished the set with the gritty A-side of her latest single, ‘Pedestrian at Best’, left the stage…

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…And then came back! Courtney announced that she would play a cover of The Lemonheads’ ‘Bein’ Around’. She then dedicated a song to her Adelaide audience — one called ‘Pickles From The Jar’! The song mentions Adelaide a few times, hence the dedication… Finally, Courtney and her band finished off the encore with a heavy version of ‘I’ll Make You Happy’ by The Easybeats. And so she and her band finished her show a little bit after 11:00.

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I really, really enjoyed seeing Courtney Barnett live! Though I couldn’t see very well, and my ears rang for a while, I had an awesome night! Courtney really is amazing live, and is definitely a must-see. (And meeting her and Dave was a huge plus!) You can listen to Sometimes I Sit and Think and Sometimes I Just Sit here, and you can buy it here.

I didn't take this picture. All credit goes to The Gov!

I didn’t take this picture. All credit goes to The Gov!

Haddy Grimble* to y’all! (A Christmas post…)

very odd

Well, it’s that time of year again. Christmas time, in case you haven’t noticed. It’s Christmas Eve down here in our rather large, isolated corner of the globe known as Australia, so I decided I should do a post wishing all my followers a very haddy Crimble and a merry New Year**!

Most of you who are reading this might be freezing in the Northern Hemisphere, and experiencing a White Christmas! But it is Summer in Australia, and as usual, Christmas in Adelaide will be in the mid-twenties. (Which is surprisingly cool for Summer…) And I haven’t been in a very Christmassy mood this year. We only put up a few Christmas decorations on the weekend. I haven’t listened to any Christmas songs of my own will, excepting The Beatles’ Christmas Records and ‘Happy Xmas (War Is Over)’. Bah humbug. But anyway, I thought I would prove I am not the Grinch in disguise and do a post on how to celebrate a ‘All You Need Is The Beatles’-style Christmas with an ‘All You Need Is The Beatles’-style Christmas playlist! So here goes…

Those of you who've watched 'George Harrison: Living In The Material World', you'll remember that story about the Apple Christmas Party and the Hells Angels. (Google it.) This is from the same event...

Those of you who’ve watched ‘George Harrison: Living In The Material World’, you’ll remember that story about the Apple Christmas Party and the Hells Angels. (Google it.) This is from the same event…

 

‘Christmastime (Is Here Again)’ — The Beatles!

A Beatles Christmas song! With Beatle harmonies! Yay! tangerinetrees’ perfect Christmas song…

For those of you who don’t know anything about this song, The Beatles released Christmas records every year. But these records were only available to their fan club. This song is from the 1967 Christmas Record, which was originally about seven minutes long. This edit was used in 1995 as the B-side to ‘Free As A Bird’. The Smithereens did a very enjoyable cover, which I will post below:

 

‘Happy Xmas (War Is Over)’ — John Lennon

Hands down my favourite officially released and easily obtainable Christmas song! (The above is my favourite of all time.) The song was based off a 1969 Johnandyoko campaign using billboards reading ‘WAR IS OVER!’ in 11 cities. The mantra chanted by the children’s choir/Yoko is all the more relevant today — war will be over, if we want it. Clearly the governments don’t want it to be over…

But on a less serious note, I need to deal with the subject of Yoko. So Yokes, I love your contemporary art, and I think you were a great influence on John, but you and singing… Erm, you and “singing”… Let’s just say that I wouldn’t encourage to give up your day job.

John sings wonderfully, though. In fact, ‘Happy Xmas’ is one of my favourite Lennon vocals. (Among everything else he ever sang! 🙂 )

‘Wonderful Christmastime’ — Paul McCartney

Okay, so this isn’t exactly Paul’s best. (And yes, I like Wings a lot more than I did six months ago. ‘Band On The Run’, ‘Mrs Vandebilt’ and ‘Call Me Back Again’ are three of my favourite songs. And pretty much all of their good songs are really dance-able.) Yes, it’s a bit cheesy. Yes, I think the lyrics are a bit limited. But anyway, it’s Christmas. And it’s Paul. I’d rather listen to Paul sing a bad Christmas song than, say, Wham! (*shudders*). And I guess I do like this song. 🙂

‘Oh, Little Town Of Bethlehem’ — Belle and Sebastian

Belle and Sebastian are a Scottish indie-pop band that wrote one of my favourite films, God Help The Girl. And they did a Christmas hymn! And it sounds good! Festive sounding guitar…

The Yeah Yeah Yeahs — ‘All I Want For Christmas’

I’ve just started to get into The Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and I found this whilst trying to find a nonexistent Black Keys Christmas cover. (The Black Keys are one of my other favourite bands, by the way.) I dig it! Christmas songs sound strangely good when recorded indie-style…

The Kinks — ‘Father Christmas’

I love The Kinks. And whilst I’d rather listen to ‘All Day and All Of The Night’ or ‘Sunny Afternoon’ than I would the above, I have to admit that it’s pretty damn good for a Christmas song. The overdriven guitars are pretty awesome, too.

‘Jingle Bell Rock’ — Arcade Fire

Arcade Fire sound drunk, but I don’t really care. I really like Arcade Fire, and this is just how I’d imagine an Arcade Fire Christmas song to be.

(And finally…)

The Beatles’ Christmas Records!

Every year from 1963 to 1969, The Beatles recorded a short “Christmas record” which was distributed among their fan club. I’ve already posted part of their 1967 Christmas record above, but here are all seven in their entirety. My personal favourite is the 1966 record known as ‘Everywhere It’s Christmas’, which begins at 15:40. But I, of course, enjoy all of the records… John’s wit is in full bloom, and George is also very, very funny. They must have had a lot of fun making these records!

And there you go! tangerine’s Christmas playlist in a (you guessed it) nutshell! And now I’ll take the opportunity to wish you all a merry Chrimble, haddy Grimble and a festal Christmas! Hope you all have a really gear holiday season. Good day sunshine until another day 🙂

*No, I have not lost my ability to spell. I’m referencing a poem in one of John’s books — In His Own Write — called ‘Haddy Grimble, Randoob!’

**Referencing The Beatles’ 1963 Christmas record.

I think I’m gonna be sad — I think it’s today…

A beautiful photo of John, who we sadly lost on this day. Love you.

A beautiful photo of John, who we sadly lost on this day. Love you.

On this day almost exactly 34 years ago (a previous Monday), an utterly horrible thing happened. A horrible, horrible thing. John Lennon was shot dead. I choose not to name his assassin, as he has said that he shot John for the fame that it could bring, and naming him would also be rewarding him. I choose to call him also what Paul calls him; ‘the jerk of all jerks’. I’m currently listening to Imagine, and am wearing my John-wearing-NYC-t-shirt shirt to remember him. (Not that I need any help with that, but anyway.) I’ve been half dreading this post. But here goes.

One of my very first Beatle-y memories is about John. Looking back, I think I may have known about him before I knew about The Beatles. It must have been 2009, which is coincidentally the year that the time machine in Yellow Submarine stops on. I wouldn’t have yet been ten. I remember eating dinner in front of our little box-shaped analogue TV in our dining room, at our tablecloth-covered round table which we no longer own. It must have been this day. I remember an image of the Dakota Building, and someone talking about this person named ‘John Lennon’. I then asked about who he was, and my mum explained to me who he was and how he died. Little did I know about how that man on the TV screen would change my life.

I don’t even remember why John became my favourite Beatle at first.  In around June last year (after slowly becoming a vague Beatles convert four months earlier), I read a book called Secrets and Sisterhood, which mentions John on the first page. Secrets and Sisterhood was my favourite book at the time (and still remains one of my favourite books, but the top spot is taken is by Looking For Alibrandi). But I  now know that John probably would have become my favourite Beatle, anyway.

In June 2013, I knew under 20 Beatles songs by name. I had no idea of the Lennon-McCartney songwriting partnership. And my knowledge of rock music was fairly rudimentary, as I played classical music. But as I became a bigger Beatles fan (and later, a bigger rock fan), and already being a reader, I also became a better-read Beatles fan. The first Beatle book I bought was a very expensive limited-edition printing of The Beatles’ Illustrated Lyrics, which is actually signed by Alan Aldridge. But I soon started reading actual information on John. And it almost seemed as if I was reading about myself. I realised that there was someone out there, a bit like me. And they just turned out to be John Lennon. I suppose that’s when I kind of confirmed my favourite Beatle.

Of course, over the past year, I have read/listened/watched so much stuff about John (and yes, I still refuse to read The Lives Of John Lennon) that I can quite safely call myself a John Lennon freak. (Not that I would call my love of him and the other Beatles ‘freaky’!) I laugh at his wit and humour; I find myself identifying with all his quotes about teachers and schools not recognising his ‘genius’ (long story). I find myself nodding in agreement at his political-themed songs; tears of laughter stream down my cheeks when I read one of his books (definitely recommended, if you have not done so already). I find myself studying every little thing (pun intended) in his songs (and then I find myself trying to recreate such things with varying amounts of); I wonder what the world would be like today if he were still with us. I thank him for making me think about politics, world issues, just important things, full stop; and yeah, I do find myself looking at pictures in which I find him attractive, but that’s not the point. And the music — well…

There was a study done earlier this year that shows that music can get the listener high. And I can identify with this so much. In August this year, I had an experience that I’ll never forget. I was listening to my Revolver vinyl, and part way through ‘I’m Only Sleeping’, an emotion I’d never felt before washed over me. A feeling of intense love and euphoria for the music. Thank you, John (and Paul, George and Ringo), for that.

John inspires me in so many ways, as well. As mentioned last post, John and George inspired me to pick up guitar. I might have my first (sort-of) gig coming up in January, something which I’m looking forward to very much. John inspired me to start writing songs. And whilst I haven’t written very many (yet), one of my goals this school holidays is to put some more time into that side of writing. John and the other Beatles actually reinvigorated my love of music, full stop. And whilst sometimes there is nothing more I want to do than jam out to Tame Impala, or dance around to The Black Keys, or sway and strum to Arcade Fire, or get that music high mentioned above from The Velvet Underground and Nico (especially ‘Venus In Furs’!), The Beatles will forever remain my favourite band. And that’s just how I like it.

I see no problem in being sad at John’s death. Whilst I was born a considerable amount of time after his death, I love John very much. Unlike George’s death, for which he was ready and whilst very sad was not unexpected, John was shot. In a time where he was arguably the happiest he had ever been. And still far, far, far, far too young to die. It saddens me that someone who wrote a song about giving peace a chance died in such a violent way. John seemed to be looking forward to the rest of the ’80s. He had just launched back into the music world. He was at peace with himself. And yet someone had to take this all away. So close to Christmas, as well. I’ve chosen not to listen to Double Fantasy, as I feel it would be too painful, knowing what happens less than a month later. I was reading someone’s memories of John’s death the other day, and they likened the loss as that of ‘a friend that I never met’. And I suppose that’s what it would have been like. John, to me, is like a friend I’ve never met. (And yes, I know I’m far too old to be having imaginary friends, but forget that.) And — as I said above — though I was not alive at the time of his life (and death), I still have no problem in being sad. Forget the fact that it’s unlikely anybody reading (or writing) this would have known him. And I see no problem in being angry at the person who shot him. Whilst we should probably keep in mind that the person who owned that gun was not right in the head, doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be angry that he shot John. It’s rather sad that he wasn’t treated, actually. But I’m still angry. And sad. But despite that, here are a few John moments:

Some say Paul wrote the intro to ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’, but they are wrong! Watch this scene from The Beatles’ US Visit — John seems to playing around with the opening to the masterpiece as early as February 1964. The instrument he is playing is called a melodica. It’s a pity that there wasn’t more footage of John messing around with the melodica, but I s’pose the filmmakers didn’t know where that sequence would appear three years later.

Hee hee! I love this scene. I mean, John Lennon in a bath playing with a toy boat. Need I say more? Will cheer you up… (And yes, I will stop fangirling.)

I’m probably being slightly controversial putting this up here, but I want to. In this clip, John defends his song ‘Woman Is the Nigger Of The World’. Being the feminist/leftist that I am, I already agree with the song, but what John says is too interesting to ignore. Still relevant today.

And of course this had to be here. I love the music video, I love the song. Some love to hate Yoko, but she inspired John. Without her, this (and the above — thank you, Yoko, for inventing that statement) wouldn’t exist.

I could write more than a few books on John and how I love him and how he has changed my life. But I won’t. I will conclude this massive post here. So, John, thank you. Thank you for making me a better person. Thank you for the music. Thank you for you. I can’t convey in words how much you have changed and influenced my life, but I have certainly tried today. We will never forget you. Love tangerinetrees

john

john two

john looking so gorgeous

john three

All Things Must Pass…

Rest in peace, George.

Rest in peace, Georgie.

In Adelaide, it is currently the 29th of November, 2014. The 13th anniversary of George Harrison’s death. There is only one Beatle I haven’t done a ‘Happy Birthday’ post for, and I’m sad that that I have to write an ‘anniversary of death’ post about this particular Beatle beforehand. I’m currently listening to Living In The Material World/All Things Must Pass (I might listen to my Cloud Nine vinyl later) and wearing my Yellow Submarine t-shirt in his memory.

I realise I haven’t done a post on George within this blog yet. In fact, I don’t think I’ve really written about George since June. Rather stupid of me, ‘cos he is my second-favourite Beatle. But anyway, I shall make up for such crimes over the school holidays…

George was the last Beatle I found out about, in around March 2013. I remember a friend (who actually introduced me to The Beatles) coming to school one day and telling me that she’d discovered The Beatles wrote all their own songs, her example being ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ being credited to a ‘George Harrison’. Ah, I thought. The name of the elusive fourth Beatle. And ever since that rainy Autumn day nearly two years ago, I’ve never forgotten that name. For a few months, George was my least favourite Beatle. I don’t know why (nobody told you / how to unfold your love…) — my theory is that I placed him fourth purely because I knew next to nothing about him. But then — about a year ago (December 2013, if my memory serves correct) — George Harrison: Living In The Material World was played on Australian TV. I know for a fact that quite a few George fans have come out of watching that wonderful film, and I am among them. I became so interested with George and his music, and rightfully so. (Though I did love ‘What Is Life’ beforehand.) I can only say that I’ve listened to two of his solo albums in full (plus part of a third), but all of his songs that I’ve heard — Beatles (I’ve obviously heard all of those!) or otherwise — are absolutely impeccable. A truly underrated songwriter, I must say… (Yay! ‘Wah Wah’ — my favourite George song — is playing!).

Last year, I found out what day George died on the, well, day. I remember being quite sad, but George didn’t really mean that much to me at that point. I would have known under one-hundred Beatles songs (I now know over 250 Beatles songs…), and this was pre-Living In The Material World. I was slightly sad this morning, but now I am focusing on remembering George. As my mum said precisely a year ago, ‘Knowing what sort of person he was, George wouldn’t have wanted you to be sad.’ And whilst George’s death is very, very sad (he died far too young), it wouldn’t have been a surprise. By the time he passed on, the cancer had spread to his brain and he was ready to die. His death wasn’t as unexpected as John’s. From what I have read/watched, I think George was ready.

George (and John) inspired me to pick up guitar, earlier this year. And wow, how I thank them! Playing guitar is one of the few factors that completely changed my life in the past couple of years (The Beatles being another), and through it, not only have I come a long way in the music world, I’ve also found a heap of other good music. I can now play the large majority of my favourite songs, and I’m now dabbling in the world of songwriting. In fact, my two guitars are called John and George. And so I thank the two namesakes for inspiring me to try my hand at playing guitar!

Talking of guitar, George really was amazing at the instrument. When I listen to the licks on his solo stuff, they’re not just licks, or riffs. They swirl around the listener’s brain, like a butterfly that has been freed into an open field. They are, quite literally (in my mind), swirls. I count George as one of those iconic guitarists that you can pick from their playing within a few seconds. He really knew how to make his guitar ‘speak’. I also think he was a fabulous musician in general — he played everything from a Moog to violin, showing his versatility. Here are some of my favourite George moments (though I’m going to do a post on my favourite George songs at a later date):

‘Cloud Nine’ is a really groovy song. The guitar is awesome. George sings it wonderfully.

‘Long, Long, Long’ — George’s acoustic work in this song is stellar. The song is stellar. It sits right after a stellar song, as the last track of a stellar side of a stellar double album. (And I’m not being sarcastic. Serious.)

The obligatory ‘My Sweet Lord’! The solo in this is subject to the swirling effect I was discussing above. Beautiful.

(There are so many other George moments I love as well, others off the top of my head including ‘I Dig Love’, the two versions of ‘Isn’t It a Pity’ and ‘Art Of Dying’ — the latter rather appropriate for today, sadly.)

George also seemed like a genuinely nice person. Quite selfless, I think. There are so many stories about him being a really lovely person, ranging from the relatively well-known tale of him mortgaging Friar Park so he could create Handmade Films to fund Life of Brian (thank the not-Messiah (‘He’s not the Messiah! He’s a very naughty boy!) for that!), to him inviting fans to his house to meet him. And whilst he wasn’t perfect, who is?

And I really have only just started listening to the lyrics in his songs (stupid me), and they’re beautiful. I’m currently listening to ‘Beware Of Darkness’, and wow… His words — whether they be about God, or love, or the loss of friendship, or anything in particular — they really talk to those who care to listen. No wonder he is my second-favourite Beatle!

And one final thing: there’s a wonderful George quote that really resonates with me (well, a lot of his quotes resonate with me, but anyway), in particular. I posted it in ‘Words Are Flowing Out’, but here it is, anyway: “It’s nothing to do with how many years old you are, or how big your body is. It’s down to what your greater consciousness is, and if you can live in harmony with what’s going on in creation.” Something happened earlier this year (a story for later) that kind of threw me in at the deep end, and all of sudden made me feel very young. I had never been ‘the youngest’ before. And this quote helped me realise that age doesn’t really matter in the scheme of things. Although I connect with John the most, I feel a special kind of connection with George as well. He reminds me of, well, me a bit. George continuously inspires me, and whilst I’m not a religious person, his principles were very, very sensible. Thank you, George.

But anyway, rest in peace, Georgie. Whether it be the Dylanesque ‘Apple Scruffs’, or the swirling paisley (yep, my term) feel of ‘My Sweet Lord’, the slides on ‘I Dig Love’, or the heavy riffing on ‘Wah Wah’ and ‘What Is Life’, your music really was something special. You were something special. There is so much I could say about you, but I shall cover that another day. We love you and miss you like mad. But as you once said, all things must pass. Wherever you are, I hope you have a beautiful day. Say hello to John for us. tangerinetrees99

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george with a border collie

george with a tambourine on his head

beautiful picture

Rodriguez Report

Look carefully - he's there! My favourite picture that I took of Rodriguez at the show.

Look carefully – he’s there! My favourite picture that I took of Rodriguez at the show.

Me before the gig

Me before the gig

I know every time I go and see a concert, I refer to its respective night as ‘one of the best nights of my life’. But Wednesday night genuinely was one of the best nights in my life. Why? I was lucky enough to see Sixto Rodriguez live! Rodriguez was my first big concert (I have, of course, seen many Beatles tributes before. And I’ve been to WOMAD and the Adelaide Fringe), and let me tell you now, it was a first concert to be very proud of! The atmosphere was amazing, and I swear the live versions of his songs are even better than the versions found on his albums, Cold Fact and Coming From Reality!

For those of you who don’t know who Rodriguez is, you may have heard of a documentary about him called Searching for Sugarman. Searching For Sugarman tells the incredible story of Rodriguez’s career. The basic story is that Rodriguez releases an album called Cold Fact in 1970. It sells something like six copies in the US. But somehow a bootleg of this album found itself in South Africa. Rodriguez quickly became ‘bigger than Elvis’ there, but nobody had a clue about who he really was. In fact, he was assumed to have committed suicide on stage in the 1970s. However, some South Africans found him anything but dead in his Detroit home, and ever since Rodriguez has been a cult hit across the world. But what Searching for Sugarman fails to show is that Rodriguez was also really popular here, in Australia! Not only did Cold Fact and Coming From Reality both make numbers 23 and 24 respectively on the Australian Albums chart on original release, Rodriguez also did two Australian tours in 1979 and 1981. Cold Fact reached number 11 on this year’s charts, too.

My mum and I became Rodriguez fans after our osteopath told us about Searching For Sugarman. Mum watched it (on a plane to Singapore in January) a few months before I did. I must have watched it in around March or April, and I was hooked! So as you will imagine, Mum and I got excited when — a couple of months ago — we discovered that Rodriguez was touring Australia this month…

…But we soon found that the tickets were nearly impossible to get! Scalpers had seemingly bought up big, and there had been no limit on presale tickets. And the ticketing website wouldn’t really work. So we nearly didn’t go. However — exactly two weeks before the concert — I found out that Mum had managed to get tickets! In Gold Reserve! Row M, to be exact. Perfect seats — we could see the stage really well. Rodriguez played the Adelaide Entertainment Centre, which is huge and — as my parents would describe it — ‘a big barn’, so these seats were really precious. Especially for last minute tickets.

Finally, we drove to the the Entertainment Centre. About 45 minutes after we first arrived through the gates (at just after 7:30 pm), the support act began her set. The support act was Jen Cloher, an Australian alt-folk muso who runs independent label Milk! Records with her partner, Courtney Barnett. I listen to a lot of alternative music and watch a music show called RocKwiz on which Cloher has been (and Milk! Records had been featured in an article in my favourite magazine, Frankie), so I had vaguely heard of her, though I assume most of the audience hadn’t. Cloher is in fact too from Adelaide (she now lives in Melbourne), and became a muso after moving to a suburb called Henley Beach when she was fourteen. Apparently she was also a major Doors fan during this period, but she also mentioned The Stones, Jimi Hendrix and a certain Liverpudlian foursome that completely and utterly changed the face of the world (hmm…we don’t know who they are, do we? 😉 ) as some of her favourite artists. I really, really enjoyed her set — almost as much as the actual gig! I liked her voice, probably ‘cos it reminded me a bit of mine — low and a bit different. And she played her acoustic-electric dead hard, which I thought was cool. I must buy some of her stuff at some point. She releases on vinyl, too, which I also think is cool.

There was half an hour between Jen Cloher and Rodriguez, so my parents and I sat ’round talking, and I may or may not have photobombed the person in front of us’s selfie, which may or may not have been found on Instagram the next morning… But then finally, the lights dimmed and Rodriguez’s band walked onstage. And I noticed something. A female bassist! It saddens me that one rarely sees female guitarists/bassists/drummers in the music industry, and as a female guitarist myself, the fact that a female bassist had been chosen for Rodriguez’s (Australian tour) band made me really happy. But not as happy as I was within a few minutes… Soon enough, the crowd went absolutely ballistic, and I could just see Rodriguez being led onstage (he now suffers from glaucoma). His management team (I assume) introduced him, and the crowd went nuts again. Rodriguez started playing a song — which I think is on his second album Coming From Reality (which I haven’t listened to in its entirety) — that I didn’t know. But I certainly knew the song he played third — ‘Only Good For Conversation’ (my favourite of his songs)! (He played ‘Crucify Your Mind’ second.) He obviously performed ‘Sugarman’ and ‘I Wonder’ (after which he said, ‘Well, I wonder — but I really don’t want to know.’), but he played so many other gems too. Other songs of his he performed included ‘Like Janis’ and ‘The Establishment Blues’, ‘Street Boy’ and ‘Forget It’, ‘I Think Of You’ and ‘Rich Folks’ Hoax’ — he even played a cover of ‘Blue Suede Shoes’! His voice sounds just as amazing as it does on record, and he played a really interesting technique of guitar. His actual instrument was interesting, too. The drummer and bassist were both fabulous, and I was particularly blown away by the dude who played lead guitar. He played an overdriven Fender the entire night (occasionally with a wah-wah pedal) and wow, was he good! He played a lead guitar line in place of the orchestrated bits on Rodriguez’s songs, which I think made the tunes sound even better than they do on record. My favourite example would have been the added solo in ‘Sugarman’. Flawlessly stunning work, in my opinion. I don’t think I stopped smiling and stomping my feet the entire night. And if I were to sum the night up in one word? Amazing. Completely, utterly, mind-blowing amazing. After about an hour of performing, Rodriguez was lead off-stage.

But there was an encore set! Rodriguez played ‘Can’t Get Away’ and some different (and better takes) of ‘Fever’ (not The Black Keys’ song!) and ‘I’m Gonna Live Till I Die’ (I usually dislike Frank Sinatra, but I liked this version very much). The crowd (including myself) all stood up and danced and sang. And then, somewhere between 10:30 and 11:00 pm, my amazing night was over. It was somewhat of a difficulty actually getting out of the Entertainment Centre (and through the post-gig traffic), but it was definitely worth it. I took plenty of pictures, so here they are:

Me before the show (again)

Me before the show (again)

The stage before the show

The stage before the show

Rodriguez!

Rodriguez!

Rodriguez again

Rodriguez again

And to conclude, my experience of seeing Rodriguez live was absolutely amazing. I don’t think I’ll ever forget my experiences that night. Thank you, Rodriguez, for providing me with a wonderful night out.

40th post! Hurrah! What a journey these past 5 months have been.. Stay tuned for a post on my favourite Beatles quotes and possibly a post on seeing A Hard Day’s Night at the cinema (only a week ’till I get to see it on the big screen!). Right now, I’m listening to the White Album. ‘Till next week, though, good day sunshine 🙂

HAPPY BIRTHDAY JOHN!!!

🙂

Today is John Entwistle’s (the bassist of The Who) birthday. Happy birthday John Entw– IT’S JOHN LENNON’S BIRTHDAY! Happy birthday to you / happy birthday to you / happy birthday dear John / happy birthday to you! I’m currently wearing my John-in-New-York tee, and am listening to John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band (digging ‘I Found Out’!).

If John were still here with us today, he would be 74. I wonder what he would be like? I often love to imagine what he would say about the sad, war-torn state of the world at the moment, what he would say about the poppy, auto-tuned “music” released. Would he have written with Paul again? Would he have developed his Double Fantasy style of music? What would he think of the internet? What advice would he have for budding musicians/writers such as myself? I guess we’ll never know… But today is not a day to be sad over the way John was taken from the world — I’ll save that for the 8th of December. Today is a day to celebrate John’s life, and remember his incredible achievements. So instead of writing a long essay on John, and becoming all sad and depressed, I’ll make a list. A list of some of the reasons of why I love the guy so. Of course, not everything will be covered — I think I could fill the entirety of the Harry Potter books with all my reasons! (Not that I’ve read Harry Potter…) If you’ve got any other reasons, or you just want to write about John, feel free to do so in the comments! So here we go:

  • First of all, John was nothing short of an amazing lyricist. In fact, ‘amazing’ is an understatement. Only John could write the beautiful lyrics of ‘Across The Universe’, or bare his soul to the world as he did in songs such as ‘Help!’, ‘I’m A Loser’, ‘Nowhere Man’ and ‘Yer Blues’. Only John could write the complete nonsense of ‘I Am The Walrus’. And that’s the thing. Only John could do it.
  • But John was not just a genius at lyrics — the actual MUSIC he wrote is utterly incredible, too. Though he stereotypically was the rocker of The Beatles (i.e. ‘Revolution’), many of his songs feature beautifully complex, tender melodies, of which an undereducated Beatles fan would assume were the creation of Paul. Take a listen to ‘Good Night’, ‘Julia’, ‘Norwegian Wood’, ‘In My Life’ (in my opinion, that story about Paul writing the melody of ‘IML’ is rubbish) — a few examples of many. How beautiful are the melodies? And his solo career, too — ‘Love’, ‘Mother’, ‘Happy Xmas (War Is Over)’, ‘Look At Me’. Ditto. To quote John on the melody of ‘Love’: “It’s a beautiful melody and I’m not even known for writing melody.” Too true.
  • His voice. John had one of the most amazing voices the music industry will ever see. He could do anything, from a tender, acoustic ballad like his parts in ‘A Day In The Life’ and ‘Dear Prudence’, to raw, emotional rock like ‘Mother’ and ‘Well, Well, Well’. He had an astounding range, too — reaching from a C2 (two Cs below middle C) to a C#6 (two Cs ABOVE middle C). Wow. I can just get to one C above middle C, and I’m a girl.
  • Despite what people love to say, John was an amazing guitarist. Rhythm guitarist, in particular. If you, too, play rhythm guitar, you’ll know how damn impossible the rhythm part to ‘All My Loving’ is to play, but then there’s ‘I’m Looking Through You’ and ‘Norwegian Wood’ (don’t ask me how he played that) and ‘Help!’ and ‘A Day In The Life’ and just about every song he fingerpicked.
  • And, yeah, he was a pretty minimalistic lead guitarist, but who can forget the opening crunch of ‘Revolution’? The catchy solo of ‘Get Back’? The slide work of ‘For You Blue’? And if he did play the ‘Hey Bulldog’ solo (nobody’s sure whether it’s him or George), that’s really accomplished. And he supposedly did my beloved Zeppelinesque guitar work on ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’!
  • Other instruments he could play and/or played on his/The Beatles’ records: mouth organ (harmonica), piano/organ, bass, drums, saxophone, percussion in general… Impressive, huh?
  • He was hysterically funny. Everyone knows he was the Witty Beatle, but how many people have seen this in action? Listen to the beginning of the Blackpool Night Out performance of ‘Help!’, or read one of his books. I’ve only flicket through my dual copy of In His Own Write/A Spaniard In The Works, and I don’t think I’ve ever laughed so hard! Imagine what actually reading the book will be like… 🙂
  • He was really intelligent. He supposedly had an IQ of ‘well into the 150s’. To give you an idea of how high this is, an IQ of 130+ means you are a part of the 2% of the population who are gifted. 140 or above is near-genius. I don’t know how true what I read was, but I can actually believe it. I love listening to him talk, and the words he uses. I just love the way he used the English language, full stop.
  • He wasn’t afraid to speak his mind. Whether it be in the form of a song (‘Woman Is The Nigger Of The World’, ‘Imagine’, ‘Sunday Bloody Sunday’) or a statement in an interview (the ‘Bigger Than Jesus’ thing was just John commenting on religion), he said what he thought.
  • Although many disagree with his political views, being the leftist I am, I second them wholly. I agree with him over his views on peace and feminism and revolutions. His views in the ’70s, anyway. And before you go around calling ‘Imagine’ hypocritical, I think he was asking us to imagine a world with peace and no religion and no possessions, not asking us to give away absolutely everything we own. My take, anway.
  • Although numerous people (I’m looking at you, Albert Goldman and your large cult of followers) seem to think that John was a cruel, heartless bastard, people close to him have said differently. Quoth Paul: “The acerbic side was there but it was only part of him. He was also such a sweet, lovely man – a really sweet guy.”
  • John was really good at art. Obviously he was — he went to art school! You’ll remember that I went to see an exhibition of his artwork, and how blown away I was. His drawing really was amazing. Hey, a quick look at one of his books shows that!
  • It should probably be said that I do find John insanely handsome. But he was my favourite Beatle before I even had a clue as to what he looked like, so yeah. He was undeniably attractive, IMO, but I discovered that long after he became my favourite Beatle.
  • He was the first Beatle to experiment with session musicians, using two flutes on ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’! This makes me happy, ‘cos I play flute.
  • He discovered backmasking!
  • The bath scene in A Hard Day’s Night. Possibly my favourite scene in the entirety of film history.
  • His music inspired some of my other favourite artists, including Tame Impala and The Black Keys.
  • He is the Beatle I can relate to most. Probably why I love him so.

So that’s my list. Happy birthday, Johnny! You inspire the world, and are missed by many, but you will live on. Thank you for making the world a better place. I love you. Love tangerinetrees99 🙂

P.S. It’s also Sean Lennon’s birthday today. If you, too, are a psych rock fiend and a fan of artists such as Tame Impala, be sure to check out Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger, the duo he has with his partner, Charlotte Muhl. His — and her — stuff is really good! Particularly their new album, Midnight Sun. I think John would be proud!

Looking Through A Glass Onion

The promo picture for the John tribute I went to last night...

The promo picture for the John tribute I went to last night…

...and me before the show.

…and me before the show.

Well, it’s a lovely day today! It’s meant to get to nearly 30 degrees (Celsius) here in Adelaide, which isn’t so nice (there are northerly winds), but the sun is warm in a good way if you soak it up from the safety of your house. We’ve also been painting our house lately, and my room is next! Yay – no more disgusting salmon and baby-pink walls (yes, there is a mix. The house was renovated in the ’80s last)! Oh, and I listened to Sgt. Pepper earlier today – I forget how hypnotic that album is. It may not possess the same magic as I feel Revolver does, but I still am completely and utterly mind-blown by it. I am actually not listening to The Fab Four right now – I’m listening to Tame Impala’s debut EP. ‘ Half Full Glass of Wine’ is the song currently playing, to be exact. I’ve been really digging Tame Impala lately – for those of you who don’t know, Tame Impala are an Aussie modern-day psych rock band, and I think their lead singer sounds a bit like John. But anyway…

Last night – thanks to my godparents buying me a ticket for my birthday a couple of weeks ago – my mum, godparents and I went to see ‘Looking Through A Glass Onion’! ‘Looking Through A Glass Onion’ is a John tribute performed by actor/performer John Waters, with a guy called Stewart D’Arrietta on piano. And yes, for those of you who are too Offspring nuts (like me), it was the same John Waters who played Darcy, Nina’s dad-then-not-dad. (And for those of you who have no clue whatsoever as to what the hell I’m talking about, Offspring is a quirky, popular Australian drama that documents the life of Nina Proudman and her slightly-eccentric family. In fact, I think my mum is watching Offspring re-runs right now.) Yes, yes – now I’ll get on with it, and tell you all about the show! Apologies for the lack of pictures, as — quote — “use of cameras and recording devices is [was] strictly prohibited.” We were lucky enough to be sitting in the second row, though, which was fab!

(And now I’m listening to a playlist of the Black Keys’ new album Turn Blue! I have also been digging the Black Keys lately.)

So, we (obviously) arrived at the Dunstan Playhouse – where it was being held – and bought programs/CDs (thank you to my godparents for buying me the CD!) and stood ’round for a bit whilst the doors were not open. And soon enough, we were in our seats, and the lights were dimmed. D’Arrietta walked on stage and started tinkering out a tune called ‘Scouser’s Lament’. And then finally, John [Waters] appears on stage, and starts talking – in the most accurate John impersonation I’ve ever heard! It was almost as if the magical man was in the room (I wish!)… We soon find out that Waters is acting as John [Lennon] — without the dress-ups, though — and that the monologue is set on the night of December 8th, 1980, when comments such as, “That fan’s been waiting there for five hours,” and, “Ooh, he’s got a book – wonder what it is? Looks like the Catcher In The Rye,” are made.  I think we all know what happened later that night. If you don’t, Google it. I don’t really feel like writing about what happened. But the show soon became less sad, when ‘A Day In The Life’ began (just John’s bit, obviously).

The show was basically “John” recounting his life in a sort of monologue manner, with some of his most famous songs inserted when needed. There were two acts (despite the fact there was no interval – not that I care 🙂 ), presumably split up by the Beatle years and the solo years. The monologue (much of which was comprised of actual John quotes) touched on everything from his friendship with Paul to losing his mother, the groupies to being a star from Liverpool, and the songs played ranged from ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’ (after talking about Dylan’s influence on him) to ‘Nowhere Man’ (before discussing the racial discrimination Yoko was subject to in the British press), ‘Norwegian Wood’ (groupies) to a medley of ‘Julia’ and ‘Mother’ (well, the loss of his mother), Come Together (the break-up) to ‘How Do You Sleep’ (his friendship with Paul), and ‘Beautiful Boy’ (Sean) to ‘Jealous Guy’ (the Lost Weekend). Seriously impressive lighting was used throughout the show, ranging from a green background during the ‘cellophane flowers of yellow and green’ of ‘Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds’ to a pinkish-red background during ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ and shadowing in ‘Working Class Hero’.

Soon enough, ‘Isolation’ from John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band (the second-to-last number) was played – with the most impressive lighting of the show (i.e. blacking out the entire stage except for one horizontal strip show Waters’ head – it was amazingly effective). And after that, we returned to the subject of that night. John notes that the fan is still there, and makes a comment about him looking upset at John. John then talks about how he’s probably lived in the man’s living room half his life, but that doesn’t mean he knows him or anything. Then the final chilling speech is made – John hopes that the man won’t do anything bad, ‘cos “dogs can bite, y’know.” And then the room went black. Stewart D’Arrietta tapped out gunshots on his stompbox. And it was obvious what had happened. I must admit I got a little misty-eyed.

But despite the tragedy, there was still one number left. Waters sung the obligatory ‘Imagine’ with minimal lighting, perhaps indicating that John is safe now. I don’t know – that’s how I interpreted it, though. Waters and D’Arrietta then took a bow, and then made their way outside for an artist signing! I got my CD, ticket and program signed, which I’ll show below.

To conclude, I really enjoyed ‘Looking Through A Glass Onion’. Really. Enjoyed. It. As with the others, it can’t be compared with the WAC or the Beatle Boys (‘cos they’re all so different), but I loved it equally. It was fab to be surrounded by a group of fellow Lennonites (or maybe even people who’ve just discovered the kind of magic that is John Lennon), and both Waters and D’Arrietta were very talented. Once again, thank you to my godparents for buying me tickets!

Here is my signed program, CD and ticket!

Here is my signed program, CD and ticket!

(And just a couple of other things…)

I have a new song on SoundCloud! Well, in reality, I recorded it last Monday and Tuesday and uploaded it on the net on the Wednesday, but I haven’t put it on here ’till now! Please like/comment on/repost it, follow me and/or share it with your friends. If you’re on SoundCloud, feel free to drop me a PM – I’d love to hear from you! The track is a cover of The Beatles ‘The Word’ (Rubber Soul), and I recorded all the instruments myself on GarageBand (and no, I did NOT use the Smart Instruments – I played actual guitars/actually sang myself). Here it is, and enjoy!

Oh, and I finally finished my own song! I’ve finally got a complete set of chords, melody AND lyrics! Yay! As soon as it’s finished (the recording, rather) and up on SoundCloud, I will upload it here.

That’s all for now, but I’ll post again on either Tuesday or Wednesday, ‘cos it’s now holidays! Woo-hoo! Good day sunshine 🙂

Another fab Friday night in my life (pun, again, intended)!

The stage display of the Beatles tribute I went to last night - taken during interval.

The stage display of the Beatles tribute I went to last night – taken during interval.

Last night, my parents and I attended a slightly-impromptu Beatles tribute (not that I’m complaining)! As you might remember (or know – depends if you’re an Adelaidean or not), there is a lift-out in the Saturday edition of The Advertiser called the SA Weekend, the set-out of which got a bit of a makeover a few months ago. One of the changes made at that time was a page named something to the effect of ‘Go Out, Stay In’. The ‘Go Out’ bit includes a list of concerts, exhibitions and events in general, and the ‘Stay In’ bit includes a list of books, movies and albums of the week (yes – The White Album was once the Vintage Album of the Week). I don’t normally look at the ‘Go Out’ bit (too busy looking for more Beatles albums on the ‘Stay In’ side!), but luckily my mum did! A day after I posted on here last, Mum came into my room with the ‘Go Out’ page, indicating at a part advertising a Beatles tribute involving Glenn Shorrock of The Twilights/Little River Band, and Doug Parkinson of The Questions – two very important figures in Australian music. There was a catch, though – it was a school concert! The performance was held in the auditorium of Westminster School, and the orchestra/bands/choirs/etc. that performed were all students. Though, as I learnt last night, that if you didn’t know that they were my age, you might have thought they were professionals! The groups were almost surprisingly good, and I think they did The Fabs justice.

The gig started with one of the big bands doing a ‘Sgt. Pepper Medley’, though in reality, the songs involved were ‘Got To Get You Into My Life’ (Revolver), ‘Come Together’ – with some groovy improv. from the resident guitarist and a couple of saxophonists – (Abbey Road), and, well, ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ (okay, I could have just typed ‘Sgt. Pepper’), though it seemed more like the reprise than the actual song. On the big screen at the back, a picture was projected for each song – which I liked a lot. For this, the gatefold of Pepper was put up.

The next song was an acapella version of ‘I Feel Fine’, which was very cool! This was probably my one of my equal-favourite performances. ‘I Feel Fine’ is from their utterly-gorgeous folk-rock era (yes, I admit I would probably use ‘utterly-gorgeous’ to describe any of their eras, but still…) – one of my favourite parts of The Beatles’ career – thus I really liked hearing its ‘vocal jazz’ arrangement. The other school-exclusive performance that I liked very much was the other ‘vocal jazz’ arrangement of ‘Drive My Car’, which – too – is folk-rock Beatles (it’s on Rubber Soul), and sounded cool with the harmonies added for acapella’s sake.

The Beatles weren’t the only band to have their songs played that night – Glenn Shorrock played some of his Little River Band songs, too! Before interval, he played ‘Emma’ (which I didn’t realise was LRB until last night) and ‘Curiosity Killed The Cat’ (ditto). And then, in the second half, he sang ‘Reminiscing’ (interestingly was one of John’s [Lennon – though I assume you know who I mean when I write ‘John’!] favourite songs during the last years of his life – I can see why! ‘Reminiscing’ is also my fave LRB song), ‘Help Is On It’s Way’ and ‘Cool Change’ (ditto with ‘Emma’ and ‘Curiosity Killed The Cat). It was quite amazing, really, seeing that!

In the second half, plenty of The Fab Four’s stuff was played, too, but with either Glenn or Doug Parkinson (or both!) on vocals. ‘In My Life’ and ‘Eleanor Rigby’ were played with full string arrangements; ‘Let It Be’, ‘Dear Prudence’ (yes, I was surprised, too – but very happy!), ‘With A Little Help From My Friends’ (the Joe Cocker version, though) and ‘Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End’ (complete with the solos), however, were played with full orchestra, band AND choir arrangements! I was very happy to hear ‘Dear Prudence’ – not particularly well-known when compared with ‘Hey Jude’ – and, of course, the latter part of the Abbey Road medley! In fact, I was incredibly surprised to hear ‘Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End’, ‘cos they make up a bit of an obscure gem that only Beatles fans are aware of!

It was slightly inappropriate to take pictures – due to the fact much of the audience was there to see their kids perform – but I did manage to get a picture in interval, so that is what the stage looks like! I have actually performed on that stage, before – each year, there is a string/concert-band competition called ABODA, in which my string ensemble performs in each year (usually the concert band I’m in does too, but this year we can’t). In fact, ABODA is next week, and I’ll be heading Violin Two!!

And so to sum it all up, the concert wasn’t the WAC or The Beatle Boys, but it was a fabulous night! The school groups acted really professional and were really good, and it was a delight to see Glenn Shorrock and Doug Parkinson perform, too. If only my school did Beatles tributes…

I hope you’re having a fabulous day/night/whatever time it is wherever you are on this vast globe, and good day sunshine! 🙂

‘Let It Be’/Imagine The Art Of John Lennon

I believe I've posted this before, but I just had to post it again 'cause it's so cute! Taken in the Austrian whilst filming 'Help!'...

I believe I’ve posted this before, but I just had to post it again ’cause it’s so cute! Taken in the Austrian whilst filming ‘Help!’…

I wasn’t too sure what to post today, but I have a couple of Beatle-y/Lennon-y happenings to write about, so here goes! Excuse me if this post is a little mish-mashy (not a word, tangerinetrees99 – not a word), but hope you can follow along!

MY BRAND-NEW LET IT BE DVD

As I’m sure I said in my last post, I ordered a Let It Be DVD, and (of course) the day after I posted, it arrived in the mail! It only had to come from Pasadena (a suburb of Adelaide), after all… I should probably note that the disc is a bootleg – as are all DVDs of Let It Be – so tangerinetrees99 was a very naughty girl 🙂 !! As you can see – as it is far from the official Apple Corps-released (well, not in the case of A Hard Day’s Night) reissues of the other Beatles films – it does not come in a fancy glossy-cardboard gatefold, a slip-cover and a booklet. It is only packaged in a very simple plastic case, with a cover which I assume is an amateur’s Photoshop job. It does have its own charm, though! I’ll post some pictures of it below, and then I’ll write about the film itself, which I watched yesterday.

The front cover

The front cover

The side

The side

The back - with a completely-unrelated picture (not that I care!), a list of all the scenes and some incorrect (both grammatically and historically) information on the film

The back – with a completely-unrelated picture (not that I care!), a list of all the scenes and some slightly incorrect (both grammatically and historically) information on the film

The disc

The disc

And as for the film, I actually really enjoyed it! Despite popular belief, The Beatles are not fighting all the time (there is the famous George-and-Paul argument, after which George leaves the band for a few weeks – the latter is obviously not shown, though…), and they do smile at various points in the film. It was amazing to hear them coming up with songs such as ‘Two Of Us’ (I especially dig that electric version), ‘Octopus’s Garden’ (George was very sweet in that scene!) and ‘Across The Universe’ (again, it sounds groovy on John’s slightly-overdrive Epiphone Casino!). Heather McCartney seemed like a very cute little girl, too. And hearing Paul discuss wanting to begin touring again was interesting – John’s reaction to such mentions, too (sure, he was high on heroin at the time, so probably not a fair judgement – but still…). And of course, the Rooftop Concert! I have seen it in full once before (Mum and I YouTubed it back in January for its – *pauses to do maths sum* – forty-fifth anniversary), but last night was the first time I saw it properly, without trying to read lyrics, or wondering what song was which (that afternoon eight months ago was the first time I heard ‘Don’t Let Me Down’, ‘I’ve Got A Feeling’, ‘The One After 909’ and ‘Dig A Pony’). I actually heard Paul’s joking end to ‘Get Back’, for example (good one, Paul!)… So to end off, I really liked the film, and whilst probably no-one but hardcore Beatlemaniacs would find it enjoyable (they might enjoy it more than, erm, Magical Mystery Tour), I would certainly recommend it! This household is in order for another Beatles Movie Marathon, I think… 🙂

 

‘IMAGINE THE ART OF JOHN LENNON’ EXHIBITION

Also yesterday, I – along with my parents and my godfather – went to see the John Lennon art exhibit I also talked about last post! It was held at Hanrahan Studios – the former home/studio of prominent Australian artist Barbra Hanrahan, and Summer-house of her widowed partner, Jo Steele (a racing-car driver and sculptor) – which was a very nice venue, I must say. John’s works (or authorised prints of them) were displayed out in the large two-story studio, and there was a rather steady stream of people (whom I would assume are fellow Lennon Lovers) going through the exhibit. And my gosh, was John a talented artist! Most of the exhibition was made up of his gorgeous drawings – some very funny puns (his ‘Owls Hooting’ one, for example), some simple ink drawings of him and Yoko, some completely random yet still beautiful – however some were prints of his handwritten lyrics to certain Beatles/solo songs (i.e. ‘Drive My Car’ – found this interesting, as ‘DMC’ is a Paul song -, ‘Day Tripper’, ‘In My Life’, ‘Gimme Some Truth’, ‘Happy Xmas (War Is Over)’, ‘Real Love’ and – of course – ‘Imagine’). Oh, and how could I forget – there was a genuinely-signed Beatles picture, too (for $25, 000, mind you)! As you can probably guess, the prints were very expensive, and most of which were somewhat over $1000. However, there were a few unframed prints of his handwritten lyrics to some Milk and Honey songs sitting on the floor, so we brought home a gorgeous print of the lyrics to ‘I’m Stepping Out’! Here is a picture of it below, and here is their website (which I think I posted before) on which you can look at some of the pictures (it won’t let me save images off it, so I can’t put them directly on here).

Here is our print - it will be going in our living room, once the house has been painted. Too expensive to sit on the floor of my bedroom!

Here is our print – it will be going in our living room, once the house has been painted. Too expensive to sit on the floor of my bedroom!

 

So there we go – my post for the week (I will post more in school holidays, I promise)! I ‘spose I should pause ‘I Don’t Want To Spoil The Party’ (I’m listening to Beatles For Sale), and publish this. Have a fab day, and good day sunshine! 🙂

 

LOOK WHAT CAME IN THE MAIL YESTERDAY!! (a.k.a. Thank You Mr. Postman Pt. 3)

Here it is - the sacred BluRay!

Here it is – the sacred BluRay!

I was going to post yesterday, about a Lennon-y happening in Adelaide that my mum discovered via her Facebook Newsfeed, but something stopped me from doing so (not that I’m complaining!). My mum was driving me home from school, and was telling me that she had checked our mailbox (which is usually my job, but she had done it earlier that day). I asked her if there was anything for me – I wasn’t expecting her answer, as the expected arrival date (according to Amazon – where I ordered it) for what came was August 4th. So, Mum implied that there was something for me, but it was addressed to her. I quickly clued on – my beautiful A Hard Day’s Night BluRay had landed in our letterbox! I squealed (as you do), and as soon as we arrived home, I ran through the house and found a cardboard box on our dining-room table. I reached into the box, and the above package came out. And that package is now going to receive a bit of a review from me!

THE PACKAGING

The British edition of A Hard Day’s Night – unlike its Australian counterpart – comes in a fancy slip-case, not unlike the ones that come with the official Apple Corps releases of Help! and Yellow Submarine. The words ‘THE BEATLES’ and ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ are embossed, and stick out in comparison to the rest of the box. On the front cover, there is a famous still from the ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’ scene, in which they are chased around London. As many people will know, the cover was changed a few times, for which I am glad. If you have not seen the original cover (designed by some graphic design franchise called La Boca), be thankful – it was absolutely ATROCIOUS. But back onto the design that was used – on the back of slip-case, there is – obviously – the blurb, the credits, a list of the nine (nine!) special features and all the jargon-like information to do with the way it appears on the screen. Amongst that, though, is two rows of pictures from the A Hard Day’s Night album-cover photoshoot – however, some of these pictures are outakes that never actually appeared on the cover! Inside the slip-case, there’s nothing special (apart from the disc!) – just a standard BluRay cover, with the same appearance as the case it came in. Sadly, the BluRay does not come with a booklet, like Apple Corps releases of the other Beatles films and the US release of the above, but I don’t really mind. Oh, and the case feels nice, too – it seems almost waxy.

 

THE DISC

Oh my – A Hard Day’s Night in HD; oh my, does it look good! I used to watch AHDN through an unofficial, not-particularly-fabulous quality YouTube video, so seeing it so sharp was quite an experience. And I swear that certain parts of the film were cut out on YouTube, meaning that – despite the fact I have seen the film a good five times – last night was the first time I had seen it in full! I haven’t checked out the special features yet, but they look really good – I especially like the sound of the In Their Own Voices thing (’64 interviews with John, Paul, George and Ringo + behind-the-scenes footage) and the interview with Mark Lewisohn (the author of Tune In – or in other words, a keen Beatleologist). So to sum the above paragraph all up, I thought that film was fab enough the first times I saw it – now that I’ve seen it in HD, I love it even more!

Here some pictures of my copy – excuse the quality, as it is growing dark:

The side

The side

The back of the slip-case

The back of the slip-case

The BluRay case

The BluRay case

Inside the case, where the magic is kept!

Inside the case, where the magic is kept!

So as you can see, I’m very, very, VERY happy with the beautiful A Hard Day’s Night, especially now that I have my own copy (it has been out-of-print Down Under for about ten years)! And if you don’t already have a new remastered copy of this fab film, make sure you get one – you won’t be disappointed!

And as for that Lennon-y happening, there is an art exhibition of official prints of John’s work in Adelaide at the moment 🙂 ! I don’t really have time to write about it now, but I will be visiting in on Saturday thus will write about it then. For now, though, here is the link to their website, and be sure check out the exhibit if you’re a fellow Adelaidean! I knew that Johnny was a talented artist (for goodness’ sake – he went to Art School!), but I never knew he was that good until I saw the pictures on that website. Wow, John – you really were a genius (not that we didn’t all know that already)!

Oh, and I ordered  Let It Be off Ebay last night, so I will soon own all five Beatles films! I am really looking forward to seeing it, though – I know most people would find it depressing and boring (I might find it the former, as the band is falling apart – but I really still want to see it), but it sounds really interesting. And it includes the Rooftop Concert – come on; who doesn’t love that?! Until the weekend, though, good day sunshine from me! 🙂