Making Mixtapes…

The disappearance of mixtapes is sad, in my opinion. Making someone a YouTube playlist of their favourite tunes is a nice gesture, but it doesn’t seem to have as much thought and effort behind it. Plus, nothing beats listening to “physical” music.

So, in keeping with my mixtape-ish mood, I thought I’d make just that! Of course, for the sake of the Internet, a YouTube playlist will have to do, but anyway… And in keeping within the general theme of this blog, my mixtape will consist of all the songs from the ’60s and ’70s that are most important to me. So, here goes…

‘I’m Only Sleeping’, ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, ‘Here There and Everywhere’, ‘You Never Give Me Your Money’, ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Anthology 3 Version)’ & ‘Long, Long, Long’: The Beatles

Revolver

‘I’m Only Sleeping’ is perhaps my most important Beatles song. I first heard it in late 2013, and was captivated by its psychedelic, lazy vibe, unlike anything I’d ever heard before. But in August 2014, I was listening to Revolver on vinyl, and the song came on. I felt a love for the music that I’d never felt before, and I realised just how special it was. I’d called The Beatles my favourite band for over a year prior, but it was only then that I knew what it meant…

‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’ is my current favourite Beatles song. I love how, in under three minutes, it covers the history of rock’n’roll. Stretching from psychedelic imagery to Zeppelin-esque hard rock to a doo-wop parody, plus one of John’s best vocal performances, it’s definitely one of The Beatles’ best!

‘Here, There & Everywhere’ was one of John’s and Paul’s favourite Beatles songs, and it’s my favourite Paul-penned song. It has such a delicate vibe to it. The vocals from all parties are hypnotically beautiful – not to even mention the drums, and bass… A wondrous song!

‘Long, Long, Long’ & the Anthology 3 version of ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ are both folky, George-written tunes from the White Album era. The former has long been a favourite of mine. In contrast to the cacophony of ‘Helter Skelter’ before it, it’s a beautifully peaceful tune, with the wonderful guitar, organ and drums among its highlights. The latter song is my favourite version of the tune. Whilst I love the official version, with its Clapton-played lead guitar, there isn’t much better than the gentle acoustic guitar and the shimmery organ of the Anthology 3 version, for me…

‘My Generation’, ‘The Real Me’, ‘I’m Free’ & ‘See Me, Feel Me’: The Who

Thewho-therealme1

Though I love the musical work from each Who member on ‘My Generation’ (John Entwistle’s bass, in particular!), my favourite part of the song is the lyrics. Where I live, among the mainstream media’s favourite pastimes is criticising anyone under the age of 30. ‘My Generation’, like the generations before who listened to the song, made for a good antidote to their criticism & generalisations.

‘The Real Me’ is my favourite Who song at the moment. Like most of their tunes, the guitars/bass/drums/vocals are amazing – one of my favourite things about the band is how each band member was really good at what they did. The perfect opener to one of my favourite Who albums, Quadrophenia!

‘I’m Free’ & ‘See Me, Feel Me‘ are both from Tommy, my other favourite Who album.The former is a rocker, with a standout rhythm guitar performance from Pete Townshend. It’s only recently that I began to listen to it more “in-depth”, but since I have, it has quickly become a favourite. The latter in contrast, was one of my original favourites. Roger Daltrey’s falsetto vocals and Keith Moon’s drums during the “listening to you” chorus, in particular, make the song a very deserved classic…

‘Stray Cat Blues’, ‘No Expectations’, ‘Under My Thumb’, ‘2000 Light Years From Home’ & ‘Midnight Rambler (Get Yer Ya Ya’s Out version)’: The Rolling Stones

their satanic majesties request

‘Stray Cat Blues’ & ‘No Expectations’ are from The Stones’ 7th album, Beggar’s Banquet. I’ve been listening to ‘Stray Cat Blues’ almost exclusively for the past few days. It’s edgy; it’s hard; it’s great! The instruments and vocals are all awesome, and I love it. ‘No Expectations’ is another favourite. Brian Jones’s slide guitar on the song is one of the last things he did with The Stones. It’s beautiful, and only proves Brian’s musical genius.

‘Under My Thumb’ & ‘2000 Light Years From Home’ are from my favourite Stones period, the mid-’60s. Despite the horribly misogynistic lyrics, I love ‘Under My Thumb’. The fuzzed bass and stabbing guitar are great, but the highlight of the song is definitely Brian’s marimba riff. And ‘2000’ is my favourite song on The Stones’ album that everyone loves to hate, and I love to love: Their Satanic Majesties Request. The mellotron, the keyboards, the guitar & the vocals bring a song by a primarily R&B band to sound more like Pink Floyd… Probably my favourite Stones song!

My dad introduced me to Get Yer Ya Ya’s Out, and ‘Midnight Rambler’ is perhaps my favourite song on the album. I love its rawness. But the most special bit about it, for me, is the cry of “Paint it black, you devil!” at the end. Dad and I joked about it for months, and continue to do so…

‘Venus In Furs’, ‘I’ll Be Your Mirror’, ‘White Light/White Heat’, ‘I’m Waiting For The Man’ & ‘Sunday Morning’: The Velvet Underground

All_Tomorrow's_Parties--I'll_Be_Your_Mirror

‘Venus In Furs’ was my original favourite Velvets song. I remember being captivated by the cacophony of violas, guitars and drums the first time I listened to it. To this day, it’s one of my very favourites. I tried to cover it whilst busking earlier this year, with less-than-successful results…

It was only recently that I realised the beauty of ‘I’ll Be Your Mirror’. I never really liked Nico’s songs on The Velvets’ debut, The Velvet Underground and Nico, and ‘Mirror’ is one that she sings. It was only after listening to Beck’s cover of the song for his Record Club project that I realised how beautiful the song is. I particularly like the guitar part!

‘I’m Waiting For The Man’ is one of the rockier songs on Nico, yet is just as great. After the beauty of ‘Sunday Morning’, it’s refreshingly hard and punk-esque. I’ve always loved the song, and continue to do so today!

‘Sunday Morning’ was the song that introduced me to The Velvets, and perhaps the first non-Beatles song to have an impact on me. After hearing a cover of it on one of our favourite shows, my mum played me the song. And so began my love of a wonderful band…

‘White Light/White Heat’ is the title track of The Velvets’ second album. The songs are less “beautiful” than The Velvet Underground and Nico, but are no less experimental. It’s a tough, distorted avant-garde rock tune, and its influence on punk rock is easy to hear…

‘The End’, ‘L.A. Woman’, ‘Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)’ & ‘People Are Strange’: The Doors

TheDoorsTheDoorsalbumcover

‘The End’ & ‘Alabama Song’ are from The Doors’ self-titled debut. ‘The End’ is often regarded as one of The Doors’ masterpieces, and for good reason! Jim Morrison’s lyrics are some of his best, and the mysterious, psychedelic vibe that floats throughout the song is magical. The ending, with Jim’s infamous Oedipal spoken word section and rhythmic usage of the f-bomb, is also intriguing and helps create a magnificently climactic ending to the album. ‘Alabama Song’, in contrast, is a cover, but I love it all the same. Jim’s vocal performance on the song is one of my favourites, and I love Ray Manzarek’s pulsating, off-beat organ!

‘L.A. Woman‘ is the first song I can remember. One of my first memories is of my parents playing the song, and of being appalled once being informed that the song included the word ‘damn’! The album of the same name was in high rotation during my childhood, too. And now that I’m older, it has since become one of my favourite songs…

‘People Are Strange’ has always fascinated me, ever since I first heard it last year. The song was such a departure from any Doors stuff I’d heard before, at that point. Perhaps my favourite part of the song is the guitar, though the piano and, of course, the vocals give it quite a different vibe. It’s quite an understated song, and I like it a lot!

‘Welcome To The Machine’, ‘Interstellar Overdrive’, ‘The Gnome’ & ‘Wish You Were Here’: Pink Floyd

PinkFloyd-album-piperatthegatesofdawn_300

‘Welcome To The Machine’‘Wish You Were Here’ are both from, well, Wish You Were Here. The former is the song that introduced me to Floyd, and what made me a fan. I remember listening to the song last year – its hypnotising synths, the swirling vocals. It completely blew my mind, and I remain in utter awe of it. And ‘Wish You Were Here’ speaks for itself, really… The acoustic guitar that runs throughout the song is beautiful, and I love David Gilmour’s vocals, too. It’s easy to see why it’s perhaps Floyd’s best-known song!

‘Interstellar Overdrive’‘The Gnome’ are both from Pink Floyd’s debut, and the only album with input from Syd Barrett, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. ‘Interstellar Overdrive’ is an edgy, almost-overwhelming psychedelic cacophony. A favourite of mine since watching a video of Pink Floyd performing it live in 1967 with their notoriously-incredible stage show, I find the combination of experimental guitars, organs and drums captivating! ‘The Gnome’ is perhaps not a Floyd masterpiece. However, I’ve always loved the song, and it never fails to make me smile. My favourite part of the song is Barrett’s lyrics – they’re quite simple, and they almost read like some kind of whimsical fairytale, which I love!

‘Get It While You Can’: Janis Joplin + ‘Piece Of My Heart’ & ‘Turtle Blues’: Big Brother and the Holding Company

Janis_Joplin_cover

Whilst Pearl is not my favourite Janis Joplin album, it was the one that introduced me to her work. And ‘Get It While You Can’ is my favourite song on Pearl. Much like the rest of the album, it features a prominent organ part, which adds an almost psychedelic element to the song. And of course, Janis’s vocals are amazing!

‘Piece Of My Heart’ & ‘Turtle Blues’ are both from my favourite Joplin-fronted album, Cheap Thrills, by Big Brother and the Holding Company. ‘Piece Of My Heart’ not only features yet another amazing Janis vocal performance – but the guitar is great, too! The guitarists in the band – Sam Andrew and James Gurley – were ridiculously good, and I have a huge appreciation of them, as a guitarist myself. ‘Turtle Blues’, too, is one of my favourites. Janis’s vocals again go without saying, and the piano is awesome! One can only imagine what Janis would have gone on to do…

‘Dazed and Confused’, ‘Misty Mountain Hop’ & ‘Tangerine’: Led Zeppelin

Led_Zeppelin_-_Led_Zeppelin_III

For a while, I thought of Led Zeppelin as a bit overrated. Then I heard ‘Dazed and Confused’. I listened attentively to Jimmy Page’s “weeping” guitar; John Paul Jones’s almost-mysterious bass; John Bonham’s thrashing drums; Robert Plant’s vocals, which I consider to be some of his best. And I’ve loved Zeppelin ever since.

I don’t know what it is about ‘Misty Mountain Hop’, but I really like it. I love the keyboard riff that runs throughout the song, and the drums, and the lead guitar, and the vocals, but even then… Maybe it’s the memories – it’s on Led Zeppelin IV, my first Zeppelin album, and it’s also featured in Almost Famous, a film I love. Either way, though, it’s a great song!

And I took my ‘tangerinetrees99’ from ‘Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds’, but you can imagine my pleasure when I discovered that Zeppelin had a song named ‘Tangerine’, a few months ago! I was even more pleased after listening to the song itself (one of the band’s folkier tunes), which I enjoyed. It’s now one of my favourites…

‘All Day And All Of The Night’ & ‘Sunny Afternoon’: The Kinks

Kinks_AllDay

‘All Day And All Of The Night’ was among my top-5 songs of all time for ages, and still remains one of my favourites. The fuzzed guitar riff, Ray Davies’ snarly vocals and Dave Davies’ flashy solo all make for a great rock’n’roll classic! It was perhaps this song that turned me onto the harder rock which I now also enjoy.

‘Sunny Afternoon’ is my current favourite Kinks song. I read someone comparing it to ‘I’m Only Sleeping’, the other day, and I can certainly see the similarities. The lazy vibe, paired with the bassline and another great Ray Davies vocal performances, make for a great song!

‘Suffragette City’: David Bowie

ZiggyStardust

‘Suffragette City’ is my favourite Bowie song right now, and the first one I consciously enjoyed. Throughout last year, the song would often appear on iTunes Radio, and I immediately liked it. The guitar, in particular, is great, and I can’t help but smile whenever I hear it!

‘Gloria’: Patti Smith

PattiSmithHorses

‘Gloria’ begins with understated piano chords, but soon turns into an exciting, protopunk epic – the perfect opening to Smith’s highly acclaimed debut, Horses. Although I only listened to the song for the first time about a month ago, its impact on me is huge. ‘Gloria’ is what hooked me on Horses, and what inspired me to check out the rest of Patti Smith’s work. She has quickly turned into one of my favourite artists – for her unique brand of alternative rock, for her fascinating punk poetry. And as a female musician myself, she is one of my biggest influences, alongside Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth and Courtney Barnett.

‘God’: John Lennon

JLPOBCover

‘God’ is my current favourite John Lennon song. I absolutely adore John’s vocals, and his piano – whilst not overly complicated and intricate – is perfect for the song. Ringo’s drums are great, too. And though I certainly believe in The Beatles, the lyrics are such typical John, and I love them all the same…

‘What Is Life’: George Harrison

What_Is_Life_(George_Harrison_single_-_cover_art)

‘What Is Life’ was the first George solo song I ever heard. Way back when I got George and Ringo confused in pictures (!), I absolutely adored the song and would turn the radio up really loud whenever it came on. A couple of years on, I still find that guitar riff utterly irresistible!

‘Our House’ & ‘Helpless’: Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young

Crosby,_Stills,_Nash_&_Young_-_Deja_Vu

‘Our House’ was my favourite song for the year before I discovered The Beatles. It was always played on the radio, and the melody, in combination with the piano, must have appealed to me. It was only recently that I began to realise how great the song is, and it has since become one of my favourites, again…

‘Helpless’, however, is my current favourite Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young song. Written and sung by Neil Young (who has one of my favourite voices, ever), it’s a wondrously beautiful, yet somewhat sad, ballad. I particularly love the lead guitar and, of course, Neil Young’s vocals.

‘Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door’: Bob Dylan

dylan knockin on heavens door

‘Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door’ is far from my favourite Dylan song. But it has an important place in my musical history, for it was the first song I learnt to play on guitar. Guitar has since become a huge part of my identity. There is little more I enjoy than playing my instruments, and playing has given me a greater understanding and love of the music I’d begun to like beforehand. So thanks, Bob!

And there. Here’s the entire playlist mixtape:

If you were making a mixtape of the songs most important to you, what would you put on it? Be sure to tell me in the comments!

Advertisements

My Favourite Bands from the ’60s (and 70s)

As one might guess, I grew up to a soundtrack of  ’60s and ’70s tunes. And the love of mid-20th-century tunes held by 5-year-old me has well and truly stuck! So today, I’m going to write about my favourite bands from the ’60s and ’70s, and why I like them — so in no particular order…

The Doors

the doors

The Doors are an extremely interesting band. For one, their sound was a little jazzier than their contemporaries. And Ray Manzarek, John Densmore and Robby Krieger were all impeccable musicians. (Especially Ray Manzarek! That man was a genius on the organ!) And of course, Jim Morrison. His voice was incredible, and you really don’t hear anything like it from any other band from the era. And not to even mention his lyricism! His poetry is a huge thing that makes The Doors unique. He touched on themes like love, death, individuality, life and the human race in general, and I really enjoy listening to his writing. The Doors were certainly very unique, in the best possible way!

The Doors are one of two bands on this list that I’ve known for as long as I can remember. One of  my earliest memories involves a very young me being appalled at Jim’s inclusion of the word ‘damn’ in the song ‘LA Woman’, and the album of the same name was in frequent rotation during my early childhood. These days, The Doors are one of my favourite bands!

FAVOURITE ALBUMS: The Doors (1967), Waiting For The Sun (1968) + LA Woman (1971)

Pink Floyd

pink floyd

Pink Floyd’s ’60s-era work is not their better-known stuff, but it’s really cool. Their first album, The Piper At The Gates of Dawn (1967), was their only album with major input from founding member Syd Barrett, who left in ’68. The album is very psychedelic, as one would expect, and there are some awesome guitars and keyboards and effects! (I especially dig ‘Astronomy Domine’! And ‘The Gnome’.) I also really like Syd Barrett’s lyrics — his writing’s quite direct and the vocab is quite simple, but it really works! A few of them read like fairytales, too, which gives them a certain air of magic.  So the ’60s Pink Floyd are probably my favourite by a smidgeon — but that’s not to say that I don’t like the ’70s Floyd, too! Wish You Were Here, for example, is one of my favourite albums of all time. ‘Welcome To The Machine’ is one of my favourite Floyd songs, and the many parts of ‘Shine On You Crazy Diamond’ are plain awesome, and I think ‘Wish You Were Here’ speaks for itself…

I started to get into Pink Floyd after listening to Wish You Were Here on vinyl last November, and my mind was blown! I’ve been listening to Floyd quite a bit, lately. Really groovy!

FAVOURITE ALBUMS: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967) + Wish You Were Here (1975)

The Velvet Underground

the velvet underground and nico

Laden with biting guitars, avant-garde instrumentation, controversial lyrics and everything else ‘art rock’, The Velvet Underground are a band I love! Though not many people paid attention to their work in the ’60s, their music now receives the recognition it deserves. The early Velvet Underground were very avant garde in their sound — founding member John Cale was a classically-trained violist, and often played it on tracks. Their innovative guitar-ing and drumming (and Lou Reed’s singing) also helped to influence countless punk and indie bands! In my opinion, The Velvet Underground are one of the quintessential ’60s alternative bands.

My mum introduced me to The Velvet Underground. One day mid last year, she played me ‘Sunday Morning’, and I was hooked! Soon after, we got a copy of The Velvet Underground and Nico, and The Velvet Underground quickly became one of my very favourite bands…

FAVOURITE ALBUMS: The Velvet Underground and Nico (1967) + White Light/White Heat (1968)

The Who

the who

At the moment, the band I’ve been listening to the most is probably The Who. One thing I really love about them is how each member was/is extremely good at their role in the band; Roger Daltrey is an amazing singer, Pete Townshend is an amazing guitarist, John Entwistle was an amazing bassist and Keith Moon was an amazing drummer! I also think that Pete is one of the greatest songwriters ever — it’s only after I attempted to play a few songs from Tommy that I realised how complex his stuff is.  And along with The Kinks, The Who created the rock opera. Listening to Tommy and Quadrophenia and following their stories is a wonderful experience! And that’s not even mentioning the fact that their innovative usage of guitar amps, or their live shows…

I first listened to The Who after getting a best-of CD back in December. It was only in March when I really got into them, and since then, I’ve become a huge fan!

FAVOURITE ALBUMS: My Generation (1965), The Who Sell Out (1967), Tommy (1969) + Quadrophenia (1973)

The Rolling Stones

the stones

Though The Stones were probably the first band I was ever aware of, it was really only 6 or so months ago that I really started to get into them. But it’s the Stones from the ’60s that I love. Their very early stuff is biting and fresh and has the blues written all over it. And by the mid ’60s, Brian Jones’s multi-instrumental genius made a number of their songs from good to absolutely wonderful! (Take a listen to the marimba on ‘Under My Thumb’, the sitar on ‘Paint It Black’, the recorder on ‘Ruby Tuesday’, the Mellotron on ‘2000 Light Years From Home’; that’s all Brian!) That stuff is my favourite — hence why I’m one of the few that likes Satanic Majesties! I also really like the stuff from Beggar’s Banquet, and Get Yer Ya Ya’s Out is my favourite live album of all time.

Like The Doors, I’ve known The Stones for as long as I can remember. My dad is a fan, so they’ve always been around the place. I can’t remember a time when I didn’t know the names of Brian Jones, Keith Richards and Mick Jagger. And excepting a brief period in 2013 when I thought that all Beatles fans had to hate The Stones, I’ve had a favourite Stones song since I was 8 or 9. (I think it was ‘Get Off My Cloud’.)

FAVOURITE ALBUMS: The Rolling Stones (1963), Aftermath (1966), Between The Buttons (1967) + Their Satanic Majesties Request (1967)

The Beatles

rubber-soul-uncropped

As much as I adore the other bands on this list, The Beatles will always remain my favourite. There is something very special about them. Very. How they went from ‘Love Me Do’ to ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’ to ‘Revolution’ to ‘The Long and Winding Road’ (and everything in between)  in EIGHT years is mindblowing. And of course, each Beatle played their instrument really uniquely and it sounded fab! And The Beatles had four lead singers, too, and three songwriters; they each brought a different perspective to their eager listeners, and that set them apart. I also consider The Beatles some of the greatest lyric-writers, especially in the later days. And that’s not even mentioning how they not only influenced music, but how they turned the world on its head; pretty much every rock band since 1964 has been influenced by The Beatles someway or another. Their immense cultural impact changed everything, too. And the fact that nearly everyone knows who they are 53 years later says quite a lot!

The Beatles changed everything for me. I’ve been a fan since February, 2013, when I decided that they were more than just a band that’s on the radio all the time. And ever since that fateful day, my life has never been the same!

FAVOURITE ALBUMS: Everything Rubber Soul onwards!

Special mentions go to Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, Led Zeppelin, Bob Dylan, The 13th Floor Elevators and The Kinks, the songs of whom I’m currently exploring and enjoying but don’t know well enough to write about…

What are your favourite bands from the ’60s and ’70s? Be sure to send me a postcard, drop me a line…

Hope you all have a great day, and good day sunshine ’till next post! 🙂

Review of a Recent Release: ‘The Velvet Underground’ 45th Anniversary Deluxe Edition (CD format)

The album in question. Definitely worth purchasing if you love the VU!

The album in question. Definitely worth purchasing if you love the VU!

Today I thought I would do a non-Beatley post (don’t worry — I’ll go back to my usual muses next post!) centering around the most recent re-release of one of my other favourite band’s four albums. And that band, you ask? Why, the Velvet Underground!

If you have never heard of the Velvet Underground, they are a highly influential band from 1960s New York. Whilst they were barely known at the time when the band was still together, they are now recognised as one of the most innovative bands ever (especially in the punk and indie genres). The band consisted of Lou Reed (vocals, guitar), John Cale (electric viola, piano, bass — among other things), Sterling Morrison (guitar) and Maureen Tucker (drums/percussion). John Cale — despite being one of the two founding members — was kicked out of the band by Lou Reed and replaced with Doug Yule.

The Velvet Underground is the Velvets’ penultimate album, preceded by the Andy Warhol-produced masterpiece The Velvet Underground and Nico (which featured German singer/musician/actress/model Nico on vocals for four tracks) and the protopunk White Light/White Heat, and followed by the more commercial Loaded. It was the band’s first group minus John Cale, and is particularly known for influencing indie bands in later years. Two of its better-known tracks include ‘Pale Blue Eyes’ and ‘Candy Says’.

This year, the album celebrates its 45th birthday. As with all the other Velvet Underground albums, The Velvet Underground was re-released on its 45th anniversary in both a ‘deluxe’  format (a double-disc CD with a booklet) and a super deluxe format (the very-expensive six-disc package with an actual book, also being available on vinyl). My mum and I were in JB Hi-Fi (the big entertainment shop in Australia — I don’t like the place nearly as much as I like the second-hand record stores and indie retailers littered around Adelaide, but if the place sells music, what is there — asides from cash — to lose?!) the other day and I discovered the deluxe CD hidden between a VU best-of and Loaded. It became one of the many CDs we have bought at that place within about a week… 😉

The two discs and booklet come nicely packaged in a matte-finish three-way-gatefold CD case. The front cover is identical to the original release (excepting a translucent sticker running across the bottom reading ‘DELUXE EDITION’), however, the back is only the tracklisting/credits in a fairly stock standard font on a fairly stock standard background (still looks effective, though.) The gatefold features images of the original tape labels (underneath the two discs) and a picture of the band recording the album. The booklet slides nicely into the middle slip of the gatefold (on top of the latter image). It discusses the background, making and success of the album, and –separated by more pictures of the band — also the live aspect of The Velvets. I found the packaging really appealing; the inclusion of a booklet and the three-way gatefold reminds me of the packaging of the 2009 stereo (Beatles — did you really need to ask?) remasters!

And as for the discs themselves…Disc One is the album itself. But there are two mixes of the album! The one used in the deluxe edition is the better-known ‘Val Valentin’ mix, mixed by the MGM/Verve recording engineer of the same name, but Lou Reed also created another mix highlighting his parts (Sterling Morrison later nicknamed this the ‘Closet’ mix). Whilst I’ve heard plenty of tracks from White Light/White Heat and Loaded (plus the entirety of The Velvet Underground and Nico), the only song from this album I’d heard from this album prior was ‘Pale Blue Eyes’. I really enjoyed the album itself, my favourite songs being ‘Candy Says’ and ‘What Goes On’.

However, my favourite part of the album was the second disc! The second disc featured live recordings of The Velvets at a venue called The Matrix (somewhere in New York??) on the 26th and 27th of November, 1969. Apart from alternate versions from the album tracks (the live version of ‘What Goes On’ is awesome!), this disc also includes live versions of songs like ‘Heroin’ and ‘I’m Waiting For The Man’, and even songs which would be later released on Loaded, like ‘Sweet Jane’ and ‘Rock & Roll’. There is also a very entertaining segue-way from Lou Reed… This disc was really amazing to listen to, and definitely worth any VU fan’s time!

Here are some pictures I took of our copy:

The front

The front

The back

The back

One CD and an image found on the back of the right slip of the gatefold

One CD and an image found on the back of the right slip of the gatefold

The casing fully open, with the CDs and booklet intact

The casing fully open, with the CDs and booklet intact

The CDs and booklet

The CDs and booklet

The empty casing

The empty casing

And yeah, I know it’s cliche, but I’ll give the The Velvet Underground: 45th Anniversary Deluxe Edition a five out of five. The packaging is really attractive, and the music is about ten times better!

And Ringo is going to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame! When I heard this, I was actually quite shocked that the guy who’s usually credited with inventing modern rock drumming wasn’t already in the Hall of Fame, but at least he is being inducted now… I believe Paul is inducting him, as well (just like he did for John!). So although you’re obviously not reading this, congratulations Ringo! You deserve that spot.

And this weekend, ‘My Beatles Record Collection’ returns! See if you can guess what record comes next… But until then, good day sunshine! 🙂

The latest additions to my record collection

Good morning (or whatever), good morning, good morning-g! (Nothing to do save your life, call the wife in…)

Yesterday was an absolutely beautiful day in Adelaide (today is just plain hot), so my mum and I went into the city. If you are a regular reader of this blog, you’ll know I collect Beatles LPs, so it’ll be no surprise to you that I had been saving my cash for weeks for a trip to my favourite record shop — which is in Rundle Mall (which is in the city, if you’re not Australian). I haven’t been in there for at least three months, so it was nice to buy some more records. I’m known in there as The Beatles girl! But anyway, here are my purchases.

1. Though I bought a couple of non-Beatles records, my priority was (obviously) to buy a Beatles LP. And I got Rubber Soul! I already own this album…on iTunes…so it is really nice to have it on vinyl!

rubber soul lp one

If you look extra carefully at the image below, you might see that the record is not from here (Australia), or England, or America — but from Uruguay! It’s in mono, and though there are no backflaps, some scouting around on the web indicates that it is a first pressing, and the label shows it was released there on Odeon Records (The Beatles’ record label in Japan, too). I won’t go into much detail now, but here’s the back of the album and the LP itself. It is absolutely bee-yoo-ti-ful, in my opinion – it might just be my favourite of all the ones we bought!

rubber soul lp two

2. You might remember from a couple of posts ago that I mentioned that I liked an alternative group called The Black Keys. Well, I bought their latest album Turn Blue (from May 2014, so it’s new vinyl — the album debuted at number one in Australia!) yesterday, as well! The Black Keys are actually playing Adelaide next year, but the stupid venue says ‘for over-eighteens only’. Grr. I really wanted to see them. But the website did say ‘unless otherwise advertised’, so I can only hope it will be advertised otherwise. But anyway, the album is completely and utterly groovy — I would highly recommend it to anyone who really enjoys psych/alt rock. I have had the riff from the ridiculously-catchy ‘Fever’ stuck in my head ever since I listened to the LP last night. And I think it is really cool that some modern artists still release on vinyl — if/when (hopefully the latter!) I am a recording musician, I will be sure to release actual LPs, too.

turn blue black keys one

Turn Blue came with a large poster of the cover (above) AND the album in CD format (plus the beautiful cardboard sleeve), so good value for $40AUD!

turn blue black keys two

3. We have a loyalty card for the shop at which we buy our records, and we had reached ten stamps on our card! I got an Australian-edition first pressing of the Requests EP with the extra money, which was released in 1964 (between the Long Tall Sally EP and Beatles For Sale, I’d say) and plays ‘Long Tall Sally’, ‘I Call Your Name’, ‘Please Mister Postman’ and ‘Boys’. As with Rubber Soul, I won’t go into too much detail now (I need material for their respective ‘MBRC’ posts!), but here it is.

requests one

requests two

4. And finally, my mum bought a 2014-pressing (in other words, a new vinyl) of The Velvet Underground and Nico! Hope she’ll let me borrow it, ‘cos I really like The Velvet Underground… 🙂 On the original versions of this album, one could peel off the iconic yellow banana, and below would be a pink, peeled banana. Sadly, this doesn’t go for the new versions.

the velvet underground and nico one

Our version came with a fancy (well, not quite as fancy as Turn Blue) paper sleeve. It seems that most new LPs come with paper sleeves (as opposed to plastic ones) — my 2013 Help! did, too. But that Help! doesn’t exactly work…but you’ll have to wait for the Help! edition of ‘My Beatles Record Collection’ for that story (I have it on first-ed. British mono, too)… Our (or my mum’s, rather) Velvet Underground and Nico also has a gatefold sleeve, but I won’t post an image of that (probably will come up on Google if you type ‘the velvet underground and nico gatefold’).

the velvet underground and nico two

So there we go — the trip my mum and I made to my favourite record shop in an LP sleeve! (And tangerinetrees99 desperately trying to invent her own cliches…)

And that’s my post for the weekend. I’ll probably do my planned ‘The Rubber Soul Jacket Appreciation Society’ post next (but who knows? 😉 ), but this Thursday is John’s birthday! Happy birthday, Johnny! But of course he will get an extra special post — ‘extra special’ for my favourite Beatle! But until Tuesday/Wednesday, good day sunshine 🙂