I went to see Tame Impala!

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Tame Impala.

On Thursday the 19th, I had the pleasure of seeing one of my favourite bands live: Tame Impala! The Western Australian psychedelic rock band have been touring their home country in support of their latest album, Currents, and I managed to catch the second gig they played in my city, Adelaide, at one of my favourite venues, the Thebarton Theatre. In short, it was an absolutely amazing night!

Tame Impala are an anomaly in the current music industry: their albums are created by just one member (Kevin Parker), the rest of the band only joining for the tours; they play a unique brand of psychedelia that sounds somewhere between an early Pink Floyd album and a modern dance record; their popularity appears only to continue to rise, despite their alternative credentials. They’ve been a staple on the Australian music scene since their debut EP was released in 2008, and each of their three albums – 2010’s Innerspeaker, 2012’s Lonerism, July’s Currents – have garnered mass acclaim, from fans and critics alike. They’ve been one of my favourite bands for about a year, and I’ve wanted to see them almost since then, after reading a number of rave reviews of their live shows.

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More Tame Impala.

I arrived at the theatre about an hour before the show began, and bought a poster beforehand, but it didn’t seem take long for the support act to take the stage for their half-hour set. The support band were named Mini Mansions, and are perhaps most famous for being the side-project of Queens of the Stone Age bassist Michael Shuman. Their music was similarly psychedelic to that of Tame Impala’s, but bass-ier and more catchy – I really enjoyed it! I had not heard of the band before the gig, but I have since enjoyed listening to some of their stuff.

A little while later, the sold-out theatre finally filled up  and Tame Impala took to the stage! Parker and his band played most of Currents, plus many tracks from Lonerism and a couple from Innerspeaker. I found it mesmerising to see a band I admire so much playing their music live, and it was amazing to hear songs I have listened to dozens of times over played in person!

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As mentioned before, I had read masses of reviews lauding Tame Impala’s live show – not only for their musical chops, but also for their impressive lighting – so I had particularly high expectations. These were well exceeded – certainly, in part, due to their light show! Throughout the gig, lights in shades of every bright colour imaginable flew, throbbed and flashed across the stage and over the crowd, illuminating suitably psychedelic backgrounds projected onto a screen behind the band. The pictures throughout this post are among my attempts to capture their beauty, but I feel they are something that needs to be seen in person to experience their true impressiveness.

Musically, among the highlights of Tame Impala’s show was a version of one of their better-known songs, ‘Elephant’. A stomping, fuzzed-up blues track, the song’s electrifying atmosphere seemed to project onto the audience, the entire moshpit seemingly swaying to the beat. But I felt every song was played well – it is clear that the band consists of incredibly good musicians, and this was perhaps even more obvious live than on their records. One thing I noticed was how close each song sounded to its studio counterpart, a feat all the more impressive due to the lack of 4/5ths of the touring band on each cut’s official version… Both musically and visually, the band were amazing.

It was wonderful to see Tame Impala live – their shows are definitely more than worthy of the accolade they receive! You can visit their website here.

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It was 50 years ago today…

In case you didn’t know, I come from a place in Australia called Adelaide. We’re famous for a few things. Iced coffee and FruChoc chocolates, for example. And we were the second place in the world to give women the vote. And we’re the capital city of the only state in Australia that was settled by people who were actually on the right side of the law! From a musical point of view, Adelaide’s played a part in the stories of people like AC/DC, Paul Kelly and The Angels — and more recently Sia, I Killed The Prom Queen and Hilltop Hoods.
But Adelaide has claim to another musical milestone — on this day in 1964, we gave The Beatles the biggest reception they’d ever receive. 350,000 people crowded along the streets of the city, which was about a third of the population at the time. And that’s even with the lack of Ringo, who was still replaced by Jimmy Nichol when The Beatles reached here. And my grandparents are in those photos, somewhere… The Beatles played 4 sold-out concerts at Centennial Hall (which is now the Adelaide Showgrounds, where every Adelaidean goes to the Royal Adelaide Show as a kid), over two days. They paved the way for bands who would come to Adelaide in the time afterwards, like The Stones (who came in early ’65) and The Who (who came in early ’68).
And so it was 51 years ago today that The Beatles came to my hometown, and we earnt ourselves a spot on the Beatley map…

All You Need Is The Beatles

Today is a very exciting day for all Beatlemaniacs who reside in Adelaide – it was 50 years ago today, when The Beatles came to Adelaide (excuse lame Sgt. Pepper pun)! I’ve been in an unusually good mood all day, but sadly, my poor friends (whom I’ve no doubtedly overloaded with squeals of, “If only I were alive 50 years ago,” and, “John was here, 50 years ago,”, etc., etc.,) are not sharing the love. But anyway (their loss), I thought I’d do a special 50th anniversary post, jam-packed with YouTube clips, photos, fun facts and more; enjoy!

As most people know, Adelaide nearly wasn’t on The Beatles’ Australian agenda. A verbal deal had been struck up between Ken Brodziak (an Australian tour promoter) and Brian Epstein in 1963, some time before ‘Please Please Me’ rocketed to Number One in Britain. The promoter – unsuspecting of The Fab Four’s future…

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I went to see Courtney Barnett!

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Courtney Barnett

Last Thursday, I was lucky enough to see one of my favourite artists live; Courtney Barnett! She was playing a venue called The Gov, which is a bit famous in Adelaide. My parents bought me a ticket just under a day before the show, so thank you so much!

Me before the show

Me before the show

Courtney Barnett is an Australian indie singer, songwriter + guitarist. Her lyrics are marvelously witty and honest and funny, and she sings with her Australian accent. A lot of her songs are a little bit grungy, but a lot of them are softer, too. She and her partner Jen Cloher run an indie record label called Milk! Records. Courtney designs all her album art, too. She released her debut album, Sometimes I Sit and Think and Sometimes I Just Sit in March this year.

The Gov opened its doors at 7:30 and Mum + I arrived not long after. But as we were waiting, somebody walks past us and into the beer garden. And that somebody was Courtney! So after a few minutes, I plucked up my courage and went up to her. I introduced myself and told her that I’m a huge fan. She introduced me to her drummer, Dave, shook my hand, and asked if I was from Adelaide. Dave then took a picture of Courtney and me! They both said they hoped I would enjoy the show. Both Courtney and Dave were really nice, and it was amazing to meet someone I really look up to as an aspiring musician! A memorable start to a memorable night! Courtney actually watched the supports in the audience, which I thought was cool.

Courtney and me!

Courtney and me!

Soon after, the first support band started. They were called The Yabbies, and they were okay, but I thought the second support band were really good! They were called Teeth and Tongue, and played a certain style of half-synth-y, half-guitar-y indie pop which is just pleasing to the ears. Their frontwoman — Jessica Cornelius — also had great stage presence, which is always a plus. I loved dancing to their beats, and got some good photos of them, too.

Teeth and Tongue

Teeth and Tongue

Finally, at around 9:45, Courtney and her band came on! She launched into ‘Elevator Operator’, the first song on her new album, and sung the words in her signature Aussie voice. Everyone stood up, and I took prime position on top of a booth seat so I could see!

Courtney

Courtney!

Courtney and her band then played ‘Lance Jr’, a song from her first EP. ‘Lance Jr’ was in fact the first song of hers that I heard. Courtney then talked to the audience for a bit and played a few more songs from her latest album, like ‘Aqua Profunda!’, ‘Dead Fox’, ‘Small Poppies’ and ‘Nobody Really Cares If You Don’t Go To The Party’.

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A lot of people who go and see Courtney live comment on how her live performances are a bit heavier than the studio versions of her songs. And they’re right. Courtney, Dave and her bassist (a dude called Bones!) absolutely rocked The Gov! The walls and floors were quite literally vibrating! Her voice was a little bit sweeter live than it is on her studio songs — but then, she almost screamed a few of the songs live, too. There was such an air of excitement and energy buzzing throughout The Gov that night…

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Courtney then played a few more songs. One of these was the B-side of her latest single, ‘Depreston’, which is all about house-hunting in a suburb in Melbourne called Preston. (Courtney, who lives in Melbourne, often references the city in her songs.) She also played a song called ‘Kim’s Caravan’, which is about the decline of the Great Barrier Reef and climate change in general. ‘Kim’s Caravan’ is one of the softer songs on Sometimes I Sit…, but it certainly wasn’t live. Courtney’s guitar was feeding like mad during the outro, and it sounded awesome! After a bit over an hour, Courtney, Dave and Bones finished the set with the gritty A-side of her latest single, ‘Pedestrian at Best’, left the stage…

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…And then came back! Courtney announced that she would play a cover of The Lemonheads’ ‘Bein’ Around’. She then dedicated a song to her Adelaide audience — one called ‘Pickles From The Jar’! The song mentions Adelaide a few times, hence the dedication… Finally, Courtney and her band finished off the encore with a heavy version of ‘I’ll Make You Happy’ by The Easybeats. And so she and her band finished her show a little bit after 11:00.

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I really, really enjoyed seeing Courtney Barnett live! Though I couldn’t see very well, and my ears rang for a while, I had an awesome night! Courtney really is amazing live, and is definitely a must-see. (And meeting her and Dave was a huge plus!) You can listen to Sometimes I Sit and Think and Sometimes I Just Sit here, and you can buy it here.

I didn't take this picture. All credit goes to The Gov!

I didn’t take this picture. All credit goes to The Gov!

My Beatles Record Collection Pt. 7 — ‘Magical Mystery Tour and Other Splendid Hits’

I have always loved the fish-eye lens pictures from The Beatles' brief trip to India in 1966 with a passion. And I think I may have just found my favourite!

I have always loved the fish-eye lens pictures from The Beatles’ brief trip to India in 1966 with a passion. And I think I may have just found my favourite!

And so it is the 1st of March… Happy Autumn (or Spring, if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere)! In Adelaide, the month of March (or really, mid February ’till the end of March) is Festival Season. We have lots of music and arts festivals at this time of year, and it is a really awesome place to be! Tonight, I’m going to see a stage production of The Who’s Tommy (as a part of the Adelaide Festival), and next weekend I will be spending three days at WOMADelaide (a world music festival, with the best food, iced tea and shops, too!)! And in unrelated news, we are playing a Beatles medley in my school concert band! Yay! But onto the post…

‘My Beatles Record Collection’ is back — late… Sorry about that. But alas, this month I will be focusing on a The Beatles’ studio album which never really was a proper studio album — Magical Mystery TourMagical Mystery Tour was released (ironically) on December 8th, 1967, as the soundtrack to the ill-fated “film” of the same name (which I have only watched once. I didn’t hate it, but it was a bit odd…) In countries on which The Beatles were released on Parlophone, it was released as a double EP, complete with a fancy booklet and fancy packaging. But in the land of good ol’ Captiol Records (America), it was released as a full length LP along with the Beatles’ singles from ’67, because EPs were apparently “useless” at that point in time. But anyway, due to its different release methods, it is often debated between Beatles fans as to whether it should be included in the core discography or not. Ever since the ’87 remixes, EMI has included along with the core selection as a studio album as the material was never available on an actual studio album. But I am in the latter camp. Magical Mystery Tour, to me, is a Captiol compilation of a similar ilk to pretty much any Beatles album released in America before Sgt. Pepper. But oh well. As an album, some of the tracks include ‘Flying’, ‘Blue Jay Way’ (my favourite song on the album!), ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ and the famous ‘I Am The Walrus’ (goo goo g’joob). I’d say it is just as mad and psychedelic as Pepper, and I love mad psychedelia! 🙂

America was not the only place to have a Magical Mystery Tour LP, however. In 1970, the same album was released in Australia, under a slightly different title of Magical Mystery Tour and Other Splendid Hits. But it was not released on Apple, or Parlophone. It was released on a label named World Record Club (exclusively in Australia, according to the back!), which was a mail-order catalogue type thing. I obtained my copy in a cool record shop in Melbourne back in July, and apparently they are quite rare!

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This is the front cover. Note how it is so different to the US/official cover which we all know so well! The picture is a still from the ‘I Am The Walrus’ scene of the film. The font of the title is different, too. But then, the actual title itself is different too, so…

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This is the back cover (obviously!). I actually like the back cover, as it makes it clear to the listener which songs are from the film, and which ones are “other selections”. I find it interesting how some quirky pieces of text which are synonymous with the original EP/LP — like the “‘No, you’re not!’ said Little Nicola” bit underneath ‘I Am The Walrus’, and the production being credited to ‘Big George Martin’ — are included on the back of this version, too! Oh, and that little star in the top right-hand corner says ‘STEREO’, by the way. By the time that MMT was released in Australia as an LP, mono had long been not used for albums. The Beatles were in fact the first popular band to utilise stereo, as far back as Please Please Me. Funny to think how all The Beatles’ albums were packed in between 1963 – 1970. Amazing…

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This is the vinyl itself! The inner sleeve is quite interesting, as it is made of quite thick, translucent plastic — as opposed to the paper or flimsier, transparent plastic inner sleeves of the Parlophone/Apple releases. You can see the WRC record label here, too. According to Wikipedia, WRC was actually owned by EMI from 1965 onwards — which would explain why the inclusion of a Beatles album in one of those mail order catalogues (they usually weren’t included).

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A close-up of the label. The actual text isn’t that different to what one would discover on a regular Beatles release label, though of course the label itself is. Apparently WRC felt a need to point out that it should spin at 33 1/3 RPM…

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And a close-up of the vinyl! It’s in really, really good condition — near mint, actually! The vinyl is still very shiny — to the point where I had to have a few goes to try and not get my iPad reflected on the vinyl! And for a record made in 1970, the vinyl is quite heavyweight. (A lot heavier than the flimsy ‘orange label’ reissues of the same time, anyway…) It plays really well, so I am pleased!

And there we go…done for another month. I am especially looking forward to doing this month’s ‘MBRC’, as it is time for a very special double album. And I am lucky enough to have an equally special pressing of this album…

Oh, and yesterday (February 28th) would have been the 73rd birthday of my favourite Stone, Brian Jones! Lately, I have been doing a lot of reading on Brian (and The Stones). Amongst other things, Brian was a huge influence on The Stones in the early days, and he was an amazing multi-instrumentalist who made many good Stones songs great. I shall write a proper post about him at some point in the future, but for now, I shall post a few pictures of him below. Happy birthday, Brian!

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I’ll go back to my normal blogging schedule next week, I think. I have a great Beatley idea which has been in the works for a very good while, and it shall see the light of day next week! But until then, good day sunshine 🙂

Another fab Friday night in my life (pun, again, intended)!

The stage display of the Beatles tribute I went to last night - taken during interval.

The stage display of the Beatles tribute I went to last night – taken during interval.

Last night, my parents and I attended a slightly-impromptu Beatles tribute (not that I’m complaining)! As you might remember (or know – depends if you’re an Adelaidean or not), there is a lift-out in the Saturday edition of The Advertiser called the SA Weekend, the set-out of which got a bit of a makeover a few months ago. One of the changes made at that time was a page named something to the effect of ‘Go Out, Stay In’. The ‘Go Out’ bit includes a list of concerts, exhibitions and events in general, and the ‘Stay In’ bit includes a list of books, movies and albums of the week (yes – The White Album was once the Vintage Album of the Week). I don’t normally look at the ‘Go Out’ bit (too busy looking for more Beatles albums on the ‘Stay In’ side!), but luckily my mum did! A day after I posted on here last, Mum came into my room with the ‘Go Out’ page, indicating at a part advertising a Beatles tribute involving Glenn Shorrock of The Twilights/Little River Band, and Doug Parkinson of The Questions – two very important figures in Australian music. There was a catch, though – it was a school concert! The performance was held in the auditorium of Westminster School, and the orchestra/bands/choirs/etc. that performed were all students. Though, as I learnt last night, that if you didn’t know that they were my age, you might have thought they were professionals! The groups were almost surprisingly good, and I think they did The Fabs justice.

The gig started with one of the big bands doing a ‘Sgt. Pepper Medley’, though in reality, the songs involved were ‘Got To Get You Into My Life’ (Revolver), ‘Come Together’ – with some groovy improv. from the resident guitarist and a couple of saxophonists – (Abbey Road), and, well, ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ (okay, I could have just typed ‘Sgt. Pepper’), though it seemed more like the reprise than the actual song. On the big screen at the back, a picture was projected for each song – which I liked a lot. For this, the gatefold of Pepper was put up.

The next song was an acapella version of ‘I Feel Fine’, which was very cool! This was probably my one of my equal-favourite performances. ‘I Feel Fine’ is from their utterly-gorgeous folk-rock era (yes, I admit I would probably use ‘utterly-gorgeous’ to describe any of their eras, but still…) – one of my favourite parts of The Beatles’ career – thus I really liked hearing its ‘vocal jazz’ arrangement. The other school-exclusive performance that I liked very much was the other ‘vocal jazz’ arrangement of ‘Drive My Car’, which – too – is folk-rock Beatles (it’s on Rubber Soul), and sounded cool with the harmonies added for acapella’s sake.

The Beatles weren’t the only band to have their songs played that night – Glenn Shorrock played some of his Little River Band songs, too! Before interval, he played ‘Emma’ (which I didn’t realise was LRB until last night) and ‘Curiosity Killed The Cat’ (ditto). And then, in the second half, he sang ‘Reminiscing’ (interestingly was one of John’s [Lennon – though I assume you know who I mean when I write ‘John’!] favourite songs during the last years of his life – I can see why! ‘Reminiscing’ is also my fave LRB song), ‘Help Is On It’s Way’ and ‘Cool Change’ (ditto with ‘Emma’ and ‘Curiosity Killed The Cat). It was quite amazing, really, seeing that!

In the second half, plenty of The Fab Four’s stuff was played, too, but with either Glenn or Doug Parkinson (or both!) on vocals. ‘In My Life’ and ‘Eleanor Rigby’ were played with full string arrangements; ‘Let It Be’, ‘Dear Prudence’ (yes, I was surprised, too – but very happy!), ‘With A Little Help From My Friends’ (the Joe Cocker version, though) and ‘Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End’ (complete with the solos), however, were played with full orchestra, band AND choir arrangements! I was very happy to hear ‘Dear Prudence’ – not particularly well-known when compared with ‘Hey Jude’ – and, of course, the latter part of the Abbey Road medley! In fact, I was incredibly surprised to hear ‘Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End’, ‘cos they make up a bit of an obscure gem that only Beatles fans are aware of!

It was slightly inappropriate to take pictures – due to the fact much of the audience was there to see their kids perform – but I did manage to get a picture in interval, so that is what the stage looks like! I have actually performed on that stage, before – each year, there is a string/concert-band competition called ABODA, in which my string ensemble performs in each year (usually the concert band I’m in does too, but this year we can’t). In fact, ABODA is next week, and I’ll be heading Violin Two!!

And so to sum it all up, the concert wasn’t the WAC or The Beatle Boys, but it was a fabulous night! The school groups acted really professional and were really good, and it was a delight to see Glenn Shorrock and Doug Parkinson perform, too. If only my school did Beatles tributes…

I hope you’re having a fabulous day/night/whatever time it is wherever you are on this vast globe, and good day sunshine! 🙂

LOOK WHAT CAME IN THE MAIL YESTERDAY!! (a.k.a. Thank You Mr. Postman Pt. 3)

Here it is - the sacred BluRay!

Here it is – the sacred BluRay!

I was going to post yesterday, about a Lennon-y happening in Adelaide that my mum discovered via her Facebook Newsfeed, but something stopped me from doing so (not that I’m complaining!). My mum was driving me home from school, and was telling me that she had checked our mailbox (which is usually my job, but she had done it earlier that day). I asked her if there was anything for me – I wasn’t expecting her answer, as the expected arrival date (according to Amazon – where I ordered it) for what came was August 4th. So, Mum implied that there was something for me, but it was addressed to her. I quickly clued on – my beautiful A Hard Day’s Night BluRay had landed in our letterbox! I squealed (as you do), and as soon as we arrived home, I ran through the house and found a cardboard box on our dining-room table. I reached into the box, and the above package came out. And that package is now going to receive a bit of a review from me!

THE PACKAGING

The British edition of A Hard Day’s Night – unlike its Australian counterpart – comes in a fancy slip-case, not unlike the ones that come with the official Apple Corps releases of Help! and Yellow Submarine. The words ‘THE BEATLES’ and ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ are embossed, and stick out in comparison to the rest of the box. On the front cover, there is a famous still from the ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’ scene, in which they are chased around London. As many people will know, the cover was changed a few times, for which I am glad. If you have not seen the original cover (designed by some graphic design franchise called La Boca), be thankful – it was absolutely ATROCIOUS. But back onto the design that was used – on the back of slip-case, there is – obviously – the blurb, the credits, a list of the nine (nine!) special features and all the jargon-like information to do with the way it appears on the screen. Amongst that, though, is two rows of pictures from the A Hard Day’s Night album-cover photoshoot – however, some of these pictures are outakes that never actually appeared on the cover! Inside the slip-case, there’s nothing special (apart from the disc!) – just a standard BluRay cover, with the same appearance as the case it came in. Sadly, the BluRay does not come with a booklet, like Apple Corps releases of the other Beatles films and the US release of the above, but I don’t really mind. Oh, and the case feels nice, too – it seems almost waxy.

 

THE DISC

Oh my – A Hard Day’s Night in HD; oh my, does it look good! I used to watch AHDN through an unofficial, not-particularly-fabulous quality YouTube video, so seeing it so sharp was quite an experience. And I swear that certain parts of the film were cut out on YouTube, meaning that – despite the fact I have seen the film a good five times – last night was the first time I had seen it in full! I haven’t checked out the special features yet, but they look really good – I especially like the sound of the In Their Own Voices thing (’64 interviews with John, Paul, George and Ringo + behind-the-scenes footage) and the interview with Mark Lewisohn (the author of Tune In – or in other words, a keen Beatleologist). So to sum the above paragraph all up, I thought that film was fab enough the first times I saw it – now that I’ve seen it in HD, I love it even more!

Here some pictures of my copy – excuse the quality, as it is growing dark:

The side

The side

The back of the slip-case

The back of the slip-case

The BluRay case

The BluRay case

Inside the case, where the magic is kept!

Inside the case, where the magic is kept!

So as you can see, I’m very, very, VERY happy with the beautiful A Hard Day’s Night, especially now that I have my own copy (it has been out-of-print Down Under for about ten years)! And if you don’t already have a new remastered copy of this fab film, make sure you get one – you won’t be disappointed!

And as for that Lennon-y happening, there is an art exhibition of official prints of John’s work in Adelaide at the moment 🙂 ! I don’t really have time to write about it now, but I will be visiting in on Saturday thus will write about it then. For now, though, here is the link to their website, and be sure check out the exhibit if you’re a fellow Adelaidean! I knew that Johnny was a talented artist (for goodness’ sake – he went to Art School!), but I never knew he was that good until I saw the pictures on that website. Wow, John – you really were a genius (not that we didn’t all know that already)!

Oh, and I ordered  Let It Be off Ebay last night, so I will soon own all five Beatles films! I am really looking forward to seeing it, though – I know most people would find it depressing and boring (I might find it the former, as the band is falling apart – but I really still want to see it), but it sounds really interesting. And it includes the Rooftop Concert – come on; who doesn’t love that?! Until the weekend, though, good day sunshine from me! 🙂

A ‘Good Night’ (pun intended) at The White Album Concert!

 

The promotional poster for the gig.

The promotional poster for the gig.

And me before the show, in my White Album shirt (which was my only Beatles shirt until last month!). Yes, and I do wear things other than Beatles shirts...

And me before the show, in my White Album shirt (which was my only Beatles shirt until last month!). Yes, and I do wear things other than Beatles shirts…

 

Hey Bulldog/Jude/all,

Well, as you have probably gathered, I went to a gig last night. And that gig was none other than the critically-acclaimed White Album Concert! As I explained in my previous post, The White Album Concert is made up of four well-known Australian musicians (Tim Rodgers of You Am I, Chris Cheney of The Living End, Phil Jamieson of Grinspoon and Josh Pyke, an ARIA-Award-winning singer/songwriter – a soloist, too, unlike the other three) singing/playing the entirety of The Beatles (better known as The White Album), along with a 17-piece band. The show was toured once before – in 2009 – and has been travelling around Australia since the 13th of this month. As you can probably guess, Adelaide had one of their last shows – the second-to-last, to be exact. The show was held in the Festival Centre – our fancy theatre where a lot of shows are held (also the second-biggest venue in SA).

After being forced to park on the other side of town (the CBD isn’t particularly big, though – one could probably drive from one side to the other in ten minutes) due to the premiere of a play in the Dunstan Playhouse and some soccer match, we finally came to the Festival Centre. We (or more specifically, my Dad – thanks!) bought a program, which can be seen in the picture above, and, soon enough, we had entered the theatre and the lights were dimmed.

The show was begun with the band playing ‘Can You Take Me Back’ (the unrelated coda at the end of ‘Cry Baby Cry’, if you are not familiar with the title), before Chris Cheney ran onto the stage, and began playing ‘Back In The USSR’! This was followed by the entire contents of the first disc, each song being covered by either Cheney, Jamieson, Rodgers or Pyke. And then, twenty minutes after the last strum of ‘Julia’, the second half again started with Cheney – this time, though, playing ‘Birthday’. After the end of ‘Good Night’, however, the show did not finish – all four musicians came together (pun intended) to cover ‘A Day In The Life’ and a reprise of ‘Revolution’ (and most of the audience stood up and danced/sang at this point – including me)! And I should probably add that by the entirety of the White Album, I mean the entirety – this means their repertoire included ‘Wild Honey Pie’ and ‘Revolution No. 9’ (which didn’t sound much like the real thing – thankfully… But then, I listened to the entire track for the first time yesterday, and it was nowhere near as bad as I thought. I found John and George’s (non-edited) voices quite comforting, though – not sure I would have listened to the whole thing otherwise…)!

I don’t have a stand-out favourite performance, as all the covers were so darn good! I was, however, incredibly impressed by the fact that the White Album version of ‘Revolution’ was performed specifically as ‘Revolution No. 1’, and that the single version of ‘Revolution’ was kept for the encore. If I did have to choose a favourite bit, though, it would probably be ‘Cry Baby Cry’ (sang by Josh Pyke), ‘Rocky Racoon’ (Pyke, again – I don’t normally like this song too much, but it sounded like a ‘Oh! Yoko’ and ‘Racoon’ mash up!), ‘Everybody’s Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Monkey’ (Tim Rodgers), ‘Long, Long, Long’ (Pyke, again), ‘Yer Blues’ (Phil Jamieson) and Chris Cheney’s guitar-god moment, ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’! Other favourites included their versions of ‘Martha My Dear’, ‘I’m So Tired’ and ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, but to be honest, I really didn’t do too much favouring!

And did I prefer The Beatle Boys to the WAC? As with above, I really cannot choose, as they were both so different. (On a random note, I’m listening to Anthology 3 at the moment, and the acoustic version of ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ has just come on – I forgot how beautiful the demo is! I prefer it to the real thing…) As we all know, The Beatle Boys dressed up in the suits and boots and had their hair cut in moptops and put on Scouse accents – and what a great job of their tribute they did! The WAC was completely different, though – no dressing up, no accents (though Tim Rodgers did make a ‘rattle your jewellery’ joke in a Liverpudlian accent), no haircuts – just a night of electrifyingly-good music, sung by four relatively-famous musos. So again, I have no preference – let’s just say that they were both two of the best nights of my life! But this time, however, I took a lot of pictures, and only one video (0f ‘Cry Baby Cry’), so I will have something to show you of my own, for once – we were sitting in Row E of the dress circle, so I was in the perfect position to get some full stage shots! See below for my pictures and some YouTube clips of the concert in other states:

white album one

white album two

white album three

Note all the psychedelic lighting - I couldn't quite capture the beauty of them in single shots, but I tried! The acoustics were also amazing - it was so loud, but God, did it sound good!

Note all the psychedelic lighting – I couldn’t quite capture the beauty of them in single shots, but I tried! The acoustics were also amazing – it was so loud, but God, did it sound good!

white album five

The whole band!

The whole band!

 

The promo.

‘Birthday’

‘Revolution No. 1’ (gives you a good idea of the atmosphere – everyone singing!)

 

So there you – a review of my lovely night! I think I posted this last time, but here is the link to their website, so please check it out! Hope you’re all having a great day, wherever you are, and good day sunshine! 🙂

John and Paul: The David Bailey Photoshoot

 

Here's some Beatles street-art I found in Town - in a little alleyway off Rundle Street, next to a Beatnik-ish record shop and the Palace Nova cinema, if you know Adelaide.

Here’s some Beatles street-art I found in Town – in a little alleyway off Rundle Street, next to a Beatnik-ish record shop and the Palace Nova cinema, if you know Adelaide.

(A close-up.) Sadly, some person decided to vandalise poor Paul, John and Ringo - at least they left George alone!

(A close-up.) Sadly, some person decided to vandalise poor Paul, John and Ringo – at least they left George alone!

 

Hey Jude/Bulldog/everyone reading this,

Today is my last day of school holidays – 😦 – and I’m wearing my Yellow Submarine t-shirt, plus listening to Mind Games for the first time. I know many people aren’t huge fans of John’s 1973 release, but I really like it, so far! Thanks, Johnny. But anyway, I wasn’t too sure what to do today (I have a big list of potential posts written up, which I consult when I don’t know what to do – however, there are TOO MANY ideas!), so – as you can probably guess after reading my bracket-enclosed notes – I consulted my list. And I found this idea! As many people reading this will know, David Bailey is a famous photographer from the 1960s, who’s done people such as Mick Jagger, Jean Shrimpton, Kate Moss, Jude Law, Oasis (those copycats!) and Bill Wyman (yes, they’re all either models or Rolling Stones – except for Jude Law and Oasis – but Google isn’t being very helpful). And being such a famous photographer, it’s only natural that he photographed the best songwriting duo in the history of the world (in my opinion, anyway…)! On the twenty-first of January, 1965, these beautiful shots of John and Paul were taken in Bailey’s London studio. Bailey has famously said that he dislikes The Beatles (apparently The Stones are a-gazillion times better, according to him – I’m obviously on The Beatles’ side, but I like The Stones, too), and has called John a ‘f**ker’ and Paul ‘the nicest guy in the world’ (sarcastically, I assume) in recent interviews, so I didn’t think too much of him at first. But he is a very talented photographer, and has taken some of the best John/Paul pictures ever (and an incredible amount for someone who apparently hates The Beatles), so I’ll ignore his views. So here we are – enjoy!

 

John and Paul, together

Don't they look gorgeous? John looks very attractive in these photos!

Don’t they look gorgeous? John looks very attractive in these photos!

I love the hands in this one - I'm re-doing my bedroom at the moment, and I'm going to print out a couple of these 'proof-sheets' to put up, somewhere. This is going to be one of them!

I love the hands in this one – I’m re-doing my bedroom at the moment, and I’m going to print out a couple of these ‘proof-sheets’ to put up, somewhere. This is going to be one of them!

Slightest bit of tension here, but that seems to disappear...

Slightest bit of tension here, but that seems to disappear…

I think everyone knows this picture - this is the main focus of my gorgeous JL/PM tee, which I now know is a David Bailey proof-sheet! McLennon believers also seem to think that this photo proves that John and Paul were secret lovers - hmm...

I think everyone knows this picture – this is the main focus of my gorgeous JL/PM tee, which I now know is a David Bailey proof-sheet! McLennon believers also seem to think that this photo proves that John and Paul were secret lovers – hmm…

It's hard to explain what I feel when I see this - it just conveys this unspoken understanding and closeness between the two. Maybe I'm just reading too far into things, but does anyone else feel the same?

It’s hard to explain what I feel when I see this – it just conveys this unspoken understanding and closeness between the two. Maybe I’m just reading too far into things, but does anyone else feel the same?

 

Just John

 

Oh my, John - oh my! I officially proclaim John Winston Lennon the most attractive man to have ever lived! :-)

Oh my, John – oh my! I officially proclaim John Winston Lennon the most attractive man to have ever lived! 🙂

Standing up with perfect posture!

Standing up with perfect posture!

Not-perfect-posture this time, but what does that matter?!

Not-perfect-posture this time, but what does that matter?!

 

Just Paul

 

Paul looks good in a kaftan! Must have had a change of clothes...

Paul looks good in a kaftan! Must have had a change of clothes…

Paul with a ladder!

Paul with a ladder! Can’t really imagine him being handy, but then, I can’t do that with John, George or Ringo, either!

This is supposedly taken by Bailey, but I've never seen it before (not that necessarily means anything). It does look Bailey-esque, though, so I'll trust the website I sourced it from...

This is supposedly taken by Bailey, but I’ve never seen it before (not that necessarily means anything). It does look Bailey-esque, though, so I’ll trust the website I sourced it from…

 

Oh, and…

 

Aww! :-)

Aww! 🙂

 

So there you have it – David Bailey’s photos of John and Paul in a nutshell (that cliché’s getting old, tangerinetrees99), if you like!

Oh, and if you live in the UK (not sure if I’ve got any UK readers), today’s the day to go rushing out to buy A Hard Day’s Night! And talking of AHDN, GUESS WHAT SHIPPED ON SATURDAY?!?! Sorry – bad grammar – but I think that announcement is worthy of capitals! It shipped a few days early (I thought it would ship today), and the expected arrival date is next Monday. Look out for a ‘Thank You Mr. Postman’ post, but somehow, I expect it might be titled ‘GUESS WHAT CAME IN THE MAIL?!?!?!’ ! I’ll do a review on the BluRay, too, so it won’t be too much fangirling.

Something Beatle-y came in the mail today, too – a Beatles clock that I ordered off Etsy, after seeing it in Melbourne back a couple of weeks ago! I won’t do a ‘TYMP’ post, ‘cos a) I need to assemble the clock hands, and b) it’s not original 1960s memorabilia (as everything else I’ve posted about is), but here’s a picture:

clock

Oh, and on Friday, I’m going to a Beatles tribute called the White Album Concert! Four renowned Aussie musos (Chris Cheney, Phil Jamieson, Tim Rodgers and Josh Pyke) are coming together to tour around Australia singing The Beatles – a.k.a. The White Album – in full (including, erm, ‘Revolution #9’)! I believe that they’ve already done their Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney dates, and that their shows in Canberra and here – Adelaide – are sold out (we got presale tickets back in April!), but if you live in Woollongong (a place in New South Wales, if you’re not familiar with Australia) or Perth, you can still get seats. For those of you that live elsewhere (nationally or internationally), you can read all about the show plus buy their CD from their 2009 tour here (you can also buy the tickets if you – by chance – live in one of the above places). I’ll be sure to write up on it on Saturday!

So have a lovely rest of your day, and good day sunshine! 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Six Ways The Beatles Changed The World

Do not ask me what they are doing with that plastic sheet, but they look cute, and that is all! :-)

Do not ask me what they are doing with that plastic sheet, but they look cute, and that is all! 🙂

Everyone knows that without John, Paul, George and Ringo, the world would be a very different place – but how many people really know how they changed the course of pop-culture? Today, I thought I’d do a post on how those four lads made the world into what it is today, following on from a speech I wrote for a Public Speaking unit in English earlier this year. So, take a plunge into the Beatles ‘revolution’ (cue crunchy overdriven guitars), and enjoy!

6. Guitar Feedback Usage

Take a listen to the above song (the music clip was filmed in late 1965, by the way) – in particular, that noise at the start, just before that infamous riff begins. That ‘noise’ at the start is called ‘feedback’, and is created by plucking a guitar too close to its amp. Feedback was used a lot in the late-1960s/1970s by artists such as The Who, Jimi Hendrix, The Velvet Underground and The Grateful Dead. But guess who the first artist(s) to use such a thing was (were)? The Beatles, of course! Here’s what Wikipedia had to say about the innovation:

“I Feel Fine” starts with a single, percussive (yet pure-sounding) feedback note produced by plucking the A string on Lennon’s guitar. This was the very first use of feedback preceding a song on a rock record. According to McCartney, “John had a semi-acoustic Gibson guitar. It had a pickup on it so it could be amplified . . . We were just about to walk away to listen to a take when John leaned his guitar against the amp. I can still see him doing it . . . it went, ‘Nnnnnnwahhhhh!” And we went, ‘What’s that? Voodoo!’ ‘No, it’s feedback.’ Wow, it’s a great sound!’ George Martin was there so we said, ‘Can we have that on the record?’ ‘Well, I suppose we could, we could edit it on the front.’ It was a found object, an accident caused by leaning the guitar against the amp.”[3] Although it sounded very much like an electric guitar, Lennon actually played the riff on an acoustic-electric guitar (a Gibson model J-160E),[8] employing the guitar’s onboard pickup.

Later, Lennon was very proud of this sonic experimentation. In one of his last interviews, he said, “I defy anybody to find a record… unless it is some old blues record from 1922… that uses feedback that way. So I claim it for the Beatles. Before Hendrix, before The Who, before anybody. The first feedback on record.” [11]

The other Beatles song to extensively use feedback was the six-minute (or eight, depending on the version) psychedelic work-of-art ‘It’s All Too Much’, which was penned by George. As most people will recall, it was the last song (excepting the reprise of ‘All Together Now’) used in the 1968 animated masterpiece Yellow Submarine, and appears over an equally-psychedelic animation sequence almost bursts off your screen! Feedback was also used in the Toronto Rock & Roll Revival Festival performance of Yoko’s ‘John, John (Let’s Hope For Peace)’. Hmm… I was watching the footage of TR&RF the other day (thank you to my godparents for recording it!), and I absolutely loved it – especially John’s bit – until Yoko started screaming her head off. Now, I like/respect Yoko as an artist (as physical art that you can see) and as someone who made John very, very happy, but her “music” (if you can call it that) is too avant-garde for me – and that’s coming from someone who’s a bit quirky, herself! I’ll put ‘It’s All Too Much’ below, but I’ll spare you Yoko…

 

5. Stadium Concerts

The Beatles playing the first-ever stadium gig in the history of the world - AKA Shea Stadium!

The Beatles playing the first-ever stadium gig in the history of the world – AKA Shea Stadium!

I’m sure that most people reading this have seen a music gig at a large stadium – here in Adelaide, the Stones were coming to open our new Adelaide Oval (our stadium), but Mick Jagger’s girlfriend tragically committed suicide, so they’re playing in October. But the first stadium concert is not credited to the Stones, but to their ‘rivals’ (not really…), The Fab Four! The Beatles – having performed in numerous halls/theatres/clubs for about seven years – played to a full house of 55,600 fans at Shea Stadium (a sporting stadium in the city that would later become John’s home, New York) on the 15th of August, 1965! Brian Epstein almost stopped this milestone from happening, as he was worried that the tickets wouldn’t sell out – but they did! The Shea Stadium crowd – apart from beginning a trend that would go on for decades to come – was the largest crowd The Beatles ever played to. But we all know it’s not the largest crowd they ever received – that’s reserved for my town, Adelaide! Oh, and how could I forget those gorgeous suits – they all look so darn handsome! Here’s a clip from that historic concert – hope you don’t mind screaming girls!

 

4. Heavy Metal

Yes, The Beatles were the first major band to write songs that would now be classed as ‘proto metal’ – all those crashing drums and bass and guitars! No doubt about that. There is, however, an argument between Beatles fans as to which Beatles song was the first heavy metal tune. Most people know about ‘Helter Skelter’ – the heaviest song around at the time of its recording – and its influence on bands like Black Sabbath and Motley Crue, but two other Beatles songs have also been credited with the invention of a genre. The first is ‘Ticket To Ride’ – the first song ever to involve stormy drums and heavy guitar/bass lines, important components in heavy metal. People such as Richie Unterberger, Ian MacDonald and John himself (plus me!) say the record was influential in the evolution of heavy metal, and because it was recorded three years before ‘Helter Skelter’ and four years before ‘I Want You (She’s So Heavy)’ (the other song up there), it is sometimes named the first heavy metal record. Now for ‘I Want You (She’s So Heavy)’ – this is arguably the heaviest song recorded by The Fab Four, and appears on Abbey Road. The music magazine Guitar World says that it may “have inadvertently started doom metal” – listen to the song, and you’ll see why. It’s heavier than ‘Helter Skelter’ and ‘Ticket To Ride’ put together, and that ending is very metal-ish. So, as you can see, that although people who favour Paul say argue that ‘Helter Skelter’ began metal, and Lennon Lovers argue back with ‘Ticket To Ride’, The Beatles invented a genre. And the rest is history.

One thing that really irritates me is when people call The Beatles a pop group, when – in actual fact – they rocked dead hard. Even their pop-iest song – ‘I Want To Hold Your Hand’ – has a rocky rhythm guitar/bass part, and early songs such as ‘It Won’t Be Long’ and pretty much the whole of Please Please Me rock real hard, too. And when people call them poppy, they seemingly forget about every song they recorded after 1964, and those songs I just mentioned. In my (and many others’) opinion, they were just as much a rock band as The Rolling Stones and other 1960s cited as ‘rock’. In fact, those songs above are three of the hardest-rocking songs recorded in that period, if not of all time…

 

3. The Three-Minute Pop-Song (Breach Of)

Ah, ‘Ticket To Ride’ strikes again! In 1965, it was the unspoken rules of music that a pop song must not go over three minutes long. But The Beatles being The Beatles, this didn’t matter (I salute you for not conforming, John, Paul, George and Ringo!). They recorded ‘Ticket To Ride’ in early 1965, which – apart from arguably being the first heavy metal song (see above) – went for a rebellious 3:10 minutes (gasp!)! This was the first pop song to go for an amount of time longer than three minutes, and thus was the basis for all sorts of late-1960s psychedelia!

 

2. “Long” Hair and “High-Heeled” shoes (for men, that is)

The Beatles sporting moptops - or long hair (if only the world could see them in 1969!)

The Beatles sporting moptops – or long hair (if only the world could see them in 1969!)

And an advertisement for Beatle boots from the '60s!

And an advertisement for Beatle boots from the ’60s!

Sure, in the early 1960s, the world’s definition of long hair (for men, anyway) was quite different, but The Beatles were really the first rock band to wear long hair! Their moptops were outrageously long for the 1960s, at first – but of course, they changed that! As everyone knows, their hair got longer and longer as time went by, and because of this, society’s perception of the appropriate length of men’s hair dissipated. This eventually amounted to John and George’s Jesus looks in 1969, and because those two’s earlier pioneering, nobody cared. And as for the Cuban heels… here’s what Wikipedia has to say:

Beatle boots are tight-fitting, Cuban-heeled, ankle-length boots with a pointed toe which originated in 1963 when Brian Epstein discovered Chelsea boots while browsing in the London footwear company Anello & Davide, and consequently commissioned four pairs (with the addition of Cuban heels) for The Beatles to complement their new suit image upon their return from Hamburg, who wore them under drainpipe trousers.[11]

 

1. The Music Clip

Those two video clips above were made in 1967, but The Beatles first started making music clips (or ‘promos’, as they were then called) in late 1965, to substitute for live performances. This eventually amounted from black-and-white footage of the band miming to colour clips of them parading around the grounds of an English mansion (and still miming), the latter of which used for accompanying clips for their new single, ‘Paperback Writer’/’Rain’ in early 1966. These clips hit their peak in 1967 when the mad masterpieces used for promotion of ‘Penny Lane’, ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ and ‘Hello Goodbye’ were produced. Because of these (and the song-sequences in each Beatles film), the world now has the modern music clip. The rest, as we all know, is history.

 

So there we go – a list of just six of the hundreds of ways the four lads from Liverpool revolutionised the world. I’ll leave you with one final picture of The Fab Four, but good day sunshine for now! 🙂

:-) !

🙂 !

 

Beatle Boys Videos

Hey (Jude/Bulldog) all,

It has been really cold in Adelaide of late (as in three shirts plus thick coat and woolly cardigan, two pairs of socks and a pair of fleecy stockings under your pants, yet somehow you’re still frozen kind of cold) – if you’re reading this in the Northern (Song??) Hemisphere, I’m envious; I like Winter more than Summer, though, ’cause in Adelaide, most of Summer is spent sweltering inside your boiling-hot house whilst outside, the amount of degrees amount to some ridiculous number above 40. Anyway, our long-cold-lonely Winter temperatures reminded me of the Salisbury Plains scene in Help!, in which The Beatles all seem practically frozen (I know how you feel, John, Paul, George and Ringo)! I posted a clip from such parts of the film below (the song is ‘I Need You’, in case you didn’t know, and it’s a George Harrison composition, for all you Harrison-Heads out there).

 

Anyway, back on topic…Sorry I didn’t post the videos from The Beatle Boys gig yesterday, like I promised I would. My parents were using the laptop/phone (not that I needed the phone) for most of the day, and I was too busy listening to Beatles LPs on our record player (they were Let It Be and Beatles For Sale, in case you’re interested) to be bothered. There’s also another problem – WordPress (the site on which this blog is produced) refuses to let me upload the videos onto this post because ‘the file is too large’. You would probably think this is a good thing and be thanking God there is a limit on the size of files, if you saw how bad my filming skills were that night (I was being a Beatlemaniac, if you know what I mean…), but it is a right pain-in-the-neck for me. Anyway, I managed to find some YouTube clips of the band, which are probably of a better standard, so enjoy! All these songs were performed on the night in the second half with the same outfits/graphics/etc., except ‘Get Back’ (which was also done) obviously wasn’t performed on top of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney, and ‘She Loves You’ was in the first half with the imitation Beatles-in-Australia look.

 

‘Come Together’

 

‘Get Back’ (their version of the infamous rooftop concert The Beatles performed for unsuspecting – and lucky – bystanders on top of Apple Corps. HQ in January 1969)

 

‘She Loves You’

 

‘Hello, Goodbye’

 

‘Revolution’

 

‘I Feel Fine’

 

‘Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da’ (yes – I successfully touch-typed that with zilch stuff-ups, for once!)

 

So, enjoy the videos, and hope it gives you a sense of how amazing it was to see The Beatle Boys live. Also, I believe my lovely mother Facebook-ed the band with a link to this very blog, so if a Beatle Boy is reading this, I’d just like to say how much I loved your performance, and how I’d love to go see you again if you come back to SA!

Anyway – if you’re reading this in Adelaide, keep warm, and if you’re reading this in the Northern Hemisphere, enjoy the lovely warm weather that any Australian would assume you have at this time of year. Good day sunshine, for now!