It was 50 years ago today…

In case you didn’t know, I come from a place in Australia called Adelaide. We’re famous for a few things. Iced coffee and FruChoc chocolates, for example. And we were the second place in the world to give women the vote. And we’re the capital city of the only state in Australia that was settled by people who were actually on the right side of the law! From a musical point of view, Adelaide’s played a part in the stories of people like AC/DC, Paul Kelly and The Angels — and more recently Sia, I Killed The Prom Queen and Hilltop Hoods.
But Adelaide has claim to another musical milestone — on this day in 1964, we gave The Beatles the biggest reception they’d ever receive. 350,000 people crowded along the streets of the city, which was about a third of the population at the time. And that’s even with the lack of Ringo, who was still replaced by Jimmy Nichol when The Beatles reached here. And my grandparents are in those photos, somewhere… The Beatles played 4 sold-out concerts at Centennial Hall (which is now the Adelaide Showgrounds, where every Adelaidean goes to the Royal Adelaide Show as a kid), over two days. They paved the way for bands who would come to Adelaide in the time afterwards, like The Stones (who came in early ’65) and The Who (who came in early ’68).
And so it was 51 years ago today that The Beatles came to my hometown, and we earnt ourselves a spot on the Beatley map…

All You Need Is The Beatles

Today is a very exciting day for all Beatlemaniacs who reside in Adelaide – it was 50 years ago today, when The Beatles came to Adelaide (excuse lame Sgt. Pepper pun)! I’ve been in an unusually good mood all day, but sadly, my poor friends (whom I’ve no doubtedly overloaded with squeals of, “If only I were alive 50 years ago,” and, “John was here, 50 years ago,”, etc., etc.,) are not sharing the love. But anyway (their loss), I thought I’d do a special 50th anniversary post, jam-packed with YouTube clips, photos, fun facts and more; enjoy!

As most people know, Adelaide nearly wasn’t on The Beatles’ Australian agenda. A verbal deal had been struck up between Ken Brodziak (an Australian tour promoter) and Brian Epstein in 1963, some time before ‘Please Please Me’ rocketed to Number One in Britain. The promoter – unsuspecting of The Fab Four’s future…

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My Beatles Record Collection Pt. 8 – ‘The Beatles’ (aka The White Album)

Last year, there was an awesome art installation made up entirely of hundreds of White Albums. I didn't get to see it (I don't think it came to my city), but it looked really cool...

Last year, there was an awesome art installation made up entirely of hundreds of White Albums. I didn’t get to see it (I don’t think it came to my city), but it looked really cool…

For Part 8 of this series of posts, it is only fitting that the Beatles album released in 1968 is the focus. That album being, of course, a very famous double album. It’s called The Beatles. But most call it the White Album! The White Album is one of The Beatles’ most well-known releases, and is famous for its unconventional, inconsistent musical style and its nearly-all-white cover. It made number 10 on Rolling Stone’s ‘500 Greatest Albums of All Time’,and number 4 on my ranking of The Beatles’ albums last year. (If I redid the ranking, though, it would probably make number 2 now!)

Apart from arguably being the weirdest album in the history of music (in the absolute best way possible!), The White Album is famous for a few other things. The sessions for the double album marked the first time that the relationship between The Beatles became particularly strained. John, Paul and George would often inhabit three separate studios in Abbey Road, each doing their own separate overdubs for their own separate songs… Ringo quit the band for a few of the early sessions, but was convinced to return by the other three. A few songs on The White Album also “inspired” Charles Manson and his “family” to commit the despicable things that they did… (But that was by no means The Beatles’ fault. It is truly horrible that the wonderful songs that Manson chose to associate himself with will forever be stained by his actions.) Oh, and it includes ‘Revolution 9’. However, the album was one of the earliest rock double albums. It also contains some of the (arguably) greatest songs ever, like the proto-metal of ‘Helter Skelter’, the tender and beautiful ‘Julia’, ‘Dear Prudence’ and ‘Blackbird’, the Eric Clapton solos of ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’, the satire of ‘Piggies’ and ‘Glass Onion’, the first Ringo-penned tune (‘Don’t Pass Me By’), and the all-round awesomeness of wonderful songs like ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, ‘Yer Blues’, ‘I’m So Tired’… Not a bad piece of work, boys!

The White Album is also famous for its packaging. The cover is almost completely white, with the band’s embossed name being the only graphic on the front cover. That is, unless, one has a first-edition White Album. Then one would also have a number on the front, telling them what number White Album they own. Numbered WAs are particularly coveted by collectors… Original pressings also included four head-shots of each band member, and a poster with a collage of Beatles pictures on one side and the lyrics for every song. These posters were originally censored, as pictures of John and Paul naked are included on the uncensored version…

My White Album is my only other first-edition Australian vinyl (along with Revolver). In my opinion, two wonderful pleasures in life are listening to those albums on first-ed vinyl… But anyway, here is my White Album!

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Okay. Perhaps my White Album should really be called the White-with-a-coffee-stain Album. Its previous owner/s clearly mistook it for a coaster… Much like my Revolver, the cover is particularly tattered. Not that I care, though. If you look closely, you can see the embossed ‘The BEATLES’ logo. And if you look even closer…

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YES! I have a numbered White Album! I have the the 26,357th Australian White Album made. In Australia, the very early White Albums were numbered with the prefix ‘A’. Numbering went up to about the 3,000,000th WA, too. So I have a relatively low number! Due to the bad condition of the cover, it only cost me $30 AUD. And all the other numbered White Albums I have seen around here have been over 1,000,000 numbers higher. So tangerinetrees99 is a very, very lucky girl!

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This is the top of the back cover. The back cover is completely white, except for that little ‘STEREO’ stamp in the top right-hand corner. Australian stereo White Albums were made in the US, so it is slightly less rare than the UK-made Aussie mono pressings (which apparently only sold around 5,000 units). But I really don’t care!

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This is the gatefold of my album. As you can see, the spine is falling apart, sadly. On the left-hand side of the gatefold, the track-listing is written down in grey text. And on the other side, the head-shots that would have originally come with the album are pictured in black-and-white. My White Album would have originally come with the poster and headshots, but these have been lost somewhere before it reached me… Oh well!

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(The track-listing. What is your favourite song on the White Album? Tell me in the comments!)

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(The headshots!)

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These are the inner sleeves of the two discs. Again, I’m a very lucky girl, as they are the original inner sleeves! As you can see, the sleeves were originally black, probably as some kind of ironic joke! They are falling apart, but I don’t care! They still do a good job of keeping the vinyl protected…

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These are the discs, themselves. The White Album was the first proper Apple Corps release in Australia, as the ‘Hey Jude’/’Revolution’ single was released on both Apple and Parlophone, here.

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And a close-up of Side 1. As you may be able to see, the discs are severely scratched. But they play surprisingly beautifully! Really. Beautifully. The scratches are light enough so that the needle doesn’t skip, and though it crackles a bit, our record player crackles a lot, full stop. There is nothing quite like listening to The White Album on first edition vinyl. It really is an album that needs to be played loud through a good sound system, on an originally-pressed vinyl. Just the way The Beatles intended…

And there is my copy of my second-favourite Beatles album! Next month, I will return with one of the very last studio albums in the series…

Hope you all have a great Easter break! Tomorrow, I’m going to a music festival, which should be heaps of fun… And I’m now on school holidays! Yay! You should be seeing me a little more ’round here than usual. But ’till next post, good day sunshine! 🙂

Rodriguez Report

Look carefully - he's there! My favourite picture that I took of Rodriguez at the show.

Look carefully – he’s there! My favourite picture that I took of Rodriguez at the show.

Me before the gig

Me before the gig

I know every time I go and see a concert, I refer to its respective night as ‘one of the best nights of my life’. But Wednesday night genuinely was one of the best nights in my life. Why? I was lucky enough to see Sixto Rodriguez live! Rodriguez was my first big concert (I have, of course, seen many Beatles tributes before. And I’ve been to WOMAD and the Adelaide Fringe), and let me tell you now, it was a first concert to be very proud of! The atmosphere was amazing, and I swear the live versions of his songs are even better than the versions found on his albums, Cold Fact and Coming From Reality!

For those of you who don’t know who Rodriguez is, you may have heard of a documentary about him called Searching for Sugarman. Searching For Sugarman tells the incredible story of Rodriguez’s career. The basic story is that Rodriguez releases an album called Cold Fact in 1970. It sells something like six copies in the US. But somehow a bootleg of this album found itself in South Africa. Rodriguez quickly became ‘bigger than Elvis’ there, but nobody had a clue about who he really was. In fact, he was assumed to have committed suicide on stage in the 1970s. However, some South Africans found him anything but dead in his Detroit home, and ever since Rodriguez has been a cult hit across the world. But what Searching for Sugarman fails to show is that Rodriguez was also really popular here, in Australia! Not only did Cold Fact and Coming From Reality both make numbers 23 and 24 respectively on the Australian Albums chart on original release, Rodriguez also did two Australian tours in 1979 and 1981. Cold Fact reached number 11 on this year’s charts, too.

My mum and I became Rodriguez fans after our osteopath told us about Searching For Sugarman. Mum watched it (on a plane to Singapore in January) a few months before I did. I must have watched it in around March or April, and I was hooked! So as you will imagine, Mum and I got excited when — a couple of months ago — we discovered that Rodriguez was touring Australia this month…

…But we soon found that the tickets were nearly impossible to get! Scalpers had seemingly bought up big, and there had been no limit on presale tickets. And the ticketing website wouldn’t really work. So we nearly didn’t go. However — exactly two weeks before the concert — I found out that Mum had managed to get tickets! In Gold Reserve! Row M, to be exact. Perfect seats — we could see the stage really well. Rodriguez played the Adelaide Entertainment Centre, which is huge and — as my parents would describe it — ‘a big barn’, so these seats were really precious. Especially for last minute tickets.

Finally, we drove to the the Entertainment Centre. About 45 minutes after we first arrived through the gates (at just after 7:30 pm), the support act began her set. The support act was Jen Cloher, an Australian alt-folk muso who runs independent label Milk! Records with her partner, Courtney Barnett. I listen to a lot of alternative music and watch a music show called RocKwiz on which Cloher has been (and Milk! Records had been featured in an article in my favourite magazine, Frankie), so I had vaguely heard of her, though I assume most of the audience hadn’t. Cloher is in fact too from Adelaide (she now lives in Melbourne), and became a muso after moving to a suburb called Henley Beach when she was fourteen. Apparently she was also a major Doors fan during this period, but she also mentioned The Stones, Jimi Hendrix and a certain Liverpudlian foursome that completely and utterly changed the face of the world (hmm…we don’t know who they are, do we? 😉 ) as some of her favourite artists. I really, really enjoyed her set — almost as much as the actual gig! I liked her voice, probably ‘cos it reminded me a bit of mine — low and a bit different. And she played her acoustic-electric dead hard, which I thought was cool. I must buy some of her stuff at some point. She releases on vinyl, too, which I also think is cool.

There was half an hour between Jen Cloher and Rodriguez, so my parents and I sat ’round talking, and I may or may not have photobombed the person in front of us’s selfie, which may or may not have been found on Instagram the next morning… But then finally, the lights dimmed and Rodriguez’s band walked onstage. And I noticed something. A female bassist! It saddens me that one rarely sees female guitarists/bassists/drummers in the music industry, and as a female guitarist myself, the fact that a female bassist had been chosen for Rodriguez’s (Australian tour) band made me really happy. But not as happy as I was within a few minutes… Soon enough, the crowd went absolutely ballistic, and I could just see Rodriguez being led onstage (he now suffers from glaucoma). His management team (I assume) introduced him, and the crowd went nuts again. Rodriguez started playing a song — which I think is on his second album Coming From Reality (which I haven’t listened to in its entirety) — that I didn’t know. But I certainly knew the song he played third — ‘Only Good For Conversation’ (my favourite of his songs)! (He played ‘Crucify Your Mind’ second.) He obviously performed ‘Sugarman’ and ‘I Wonder’ (after which he said, ‘Well, I wonder — but I really don’t want to know.’), but he played so many other gems too. Other songs of his he performed included ‘Like Janis’ and ‘The Establishment Blues’, ‘Street Boy’ and ‘Forget It’, ‘I Think Of You’ and ‘Rich Folks’ Hoax’ — he even played a cover of ‘Blue Suede Shoes’! His voice sounds just as amazing as it does on record, and he played a really interesting technique of guitar. His actual instrument was interesting, too. The drummer and bassist were both fabulous, and I was particularly blown away by the dude who played lead guitar. He played an overdriven Fender the entire night (occasionally with a wah-wah pedal) and wow, was he good! He played a lead guitar line in place of the orchestrated bits on Rodriguez’s songs, which I think made the tunes sound even better than they do on record. My favourite example would have been the added solo in ‘Sugarman’. Flawlessly stunning work, in my opinion. I don’t think I stopped smiling and stomping my feet the entire night. And if I were to sum the night up in one word? Amazing. Completely, utterly, mind-blowing amazing. After about an hour of performing, Rodriguez was lead off-stage.

But there was an encore set! Rodriguez played ‘Can’t Get Away’ and some different (and better takes) of ‘Fever’ (not The Black Keys’ song!) and ‘I’m Gonna Live Till I Die’ (I usually dislike Frank Sinatra, but I liked this version very much). The crowd (including myself) all stood up and danced and sang. And then, somewhere between 10:30 and 11:00 pm, my amazing night was over. It was somewhat of a difficulty actually getting out of the Entertainment Centre (and through the post-gig traffic), but it was definitely worth it. I took plenty of pictures, so here they are:

Me before the show (again)

Me before the show (again)

The stage before the show

The stage before the show

Rodriguez!

Rodriguez!

Rodriguez again

Rodriguez again

And to conclude, my experience of seeing Rodriguez live was absolutely amazing. I don’t think I’ll ever forget my experiences that night. Thank you, Rodriguez, for providing me with a wonderful night out.

40th post! Hurrah! What a journey these past 5 months have been.. Stay tuned for a post on my favourite Beatles quotes and possibly a post on seeing A Hard Day’s Night at the cinema (only a week ’till I get to see it on the big screen!). Right now, I’m listening to the White Album. ‘Till next week, though, good day sunshine 🙂

My Beatles Record Collection Pt. 3 – ‘Beatles For Sale’

As pretty much everyone in Australia knows, The (Rolling) Stones played Adelaide Oval last night, so I will post this picture in commemoration. We were actually in the CBD last night to see a movie, and thanks to my dad driving past The Stones' venue, we got to hear them play 'Honky Tonk Women'. Not my favourite Stones song, but there's no denying it sounded good live.

As pretty much everyone in Australia knows, The (Rolling) Stones played Adelaide Oval last night, so I will post this picture. We were actually in the CBD last night to see a movie, and thanks to my dad driving past The Stones’ venue on the way home, we got to hear them play ‘Honky Tonk Women’! Not my favourite Stones song (by a long shot), but there’s no denying it sounded good live.

It’s that time of month again! Time for another installation of ‘My Beatles Record Collection’! And this month, it’s [insert signature Ringo drum fill]…Beatles For SaleBeatles For Sale was The Beatles’ fourth studio album, and was the last to comply by the covers/originals formula that also went for Please Please Me and With The Beatles (though both Help! and Let It Be included covers as well). It was also The Beatles’ first gatefold album (and must have been one of the earliest examples of such packaging), and is the first album on which one can really hear The Beatles start to mature. Bob Dylan’s influence on the group (especially John) is particularly evident, and the bulk of John’s first explorations of confessional lyricism (he was suffering from depression at the time) can be found on this album. The UK cover/back cover are actually two of my favourite pictures of the group (the latter can be found on my school book labels!), but sadly the cover butcherers also known as EMI Australia decided to ruin the cover here. Not many people rate this album particularly highly, but I beg to differ. Some of my favourite Beatles songs are on this album! But onto vinyl…

I have a couple of dream vinyl purchases. Y’know, a numbered White Album, that sort of thing. And one of the things on my dream list is a UK first-edition Beatles For Sale. But sadly, it is exactly what the list suggests — a dream (at the moment). My copy of Beatles For Sale is much like my A Hard Day’s Night — a ’70s “orange label” repressing. With the Australian cover (which means no gatefold). But oh well. I only got it for about 30 bucks (plus sale discount), and it was definitely 30 bucks well spent! The vinyl doesn’t play as well as some of my other records, but there are no skips and the crackle (most of which probably comes from our record player) is bearable. Here are some pictures:

beatles for sale one

Here is that dreadful Australian cover. Apparently the images are from one of the band’s Sydney concerts. On second thoughts, the cover isn’t that bad — it just looks quite ‘yick’ compared to the beautiful British one! It is pretty bad, though, as far as Beatles covers go. I can see why John complained to EMI. (Still better than any One Direction album cover! Hee hee!) My cover actually needs a glue job, ‘cos the original glue across the top edge has perished. A job for me at some point, I s’pose.

beatles for sale two

The back of the record. A similar kind of thing (the sleeve notes, the track listing, the title and the picture) appeared in black on the left side of the British gatefold sleeve. As you can see, there are no backflaps, and if you look carefully, you can see the record is in stereo (like all other Beatles re-releases of the time). The picture is actually quite outdated, if you think about it. It appears to be A Hard Day’s Night era, and The Beatles had ditched the suits and had grown their hair a bit since then. I quite like it, though.

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Here’s the really interesting thing about the cover — not specific to the Australian version, but who cares. And what is that thing, you ask? Why, Derek Taylor’s sleeve notes! Especially this quote…

It isn’t all currency or current though. There’s a priceless history between these covers. None of us is getting any younger. When, in a generation or so, a radio-active, cigar-smoking child, picnicking on Saturn, asks you what the Beatle affair was all about – ‘Did you actually know them?’ – don’t try to explain all about the long hair and the screams! Just play the child a few tracks from this album and he’ll probably understand what it was all about. The kids of AD2000 will draw from the music much the same sense of well-being and warmth as we do today.

And Derek Taylor must be psychic! Well, he got the Saturn bit wrong (that’ll probably happen in AD3000!), but the bolded sentence is truer than ever. Yes, the kids of AD2000 do draw the same sense of well-being and warmth as they did in the ’60s. And not just 2000. The children of the 2010s do to. And I bet you that the cycle will continue on forever. ‘Cos that is the reality of priceless music.

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Here’s a picture of the LP with the cover. As you can see, it’s an “orange label” version (most likely late ’70s), and like all Australian pressings (including firsts — I actually have a first-edition Australian), it comes in a plastic sleeve, as opposed to the paper ones found in UK pressings.

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And here’s Side Two of the LP. Very good condition — not a scratch! It crackles a lot, though, ‘cos it’s so thin and our record player is about as old as The Beatles’ albums. I love our record player dearly, though. Probably my favourite piece of furniture (it’s a proper stereogram) in the house.

And there you go! ‘My Beatles Record Collection’ done for another month. Stay tuned in particular for the next four months, ‘cos many of my more interesting and rare and valuable pieces will feature.

Last night, I went to see a wonderful Spanish film called Living Is Easy (With Eyes Closed). The film (named after a line in ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ is about a Spanish teacher called Antonio who is an obsessive Beatles/John fan. When he hears that John is filming How I Won The War in Almeria, he makes a trip out there from his town. On the way, he picks up two teenage hitch-hikers, and the film is basically about their adventures and Antonio’s many plans for meeting John. As long as you don’t mind reading subtitles, I highly recommend it! Google it for more information.

AND IMPORTANT NEWS FOR AUSTRALIAN READERS: A HARD DAY’S NIGHT IS COMING TO AUSTRALIA! Yay! After I thought for so long that it wouldn’t. AHDN is screening in its beautiful remastered glory as a part of the British Film Festival. If you’re Adelaidean like me, it’ll be on at the Palace Nova Cinema on November 9th at 7:30pm. Check the Film Festival’s website if you live elsewhere. But anyway, we’ve already got tickets, and I’m really excited! If you’ve been reading since the beginning, you’ll know how much I wanted to see the film on the big screen, and now I have the chance! I’ll be sure to write all about it after I’ve seen it. I guess last night will go down in my mind as the night I saw a fabulous film, found out A Hard Day’s Night was coming to Australia and heard The Stones play live.

And this Wednesday is the Rodriguez concert! I, too, am really excited about that! My first big concert! Yay! I’ll write all about it next weekend. But for now, good day sunshine! 🙂

My Beatles Record Collection Pt. 2 – ‘A Hard Day’s Night’

My 'A Hard Day's Night' LP. Also my LP of the album which has the cover that serves as the background for this blog.

My ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ LP. Also my LP of the album which has the cover that serves as the background for this blog.

Hey Bulldog (well, it has to go first sometimes)/Jude/all who care to read,

Only one more week of Term 3 left (then just one more term ’till the end of the year)! And yet more beautiful weather in good ol’ Adelaide! After being out and about, and then making considerable progress on my song (more on that later), I haven’t gotten around to posting on here until 5:00 on a Sunday night. Sorry.

But anyway, it’s ‘My Beatles Record Collection’ time again! And yes, I have noticed that a lot of my posts lately have been slightly self-centred, and I will try and un-self-centre them in the holidays. But anyway, it’s a month since I did With The Beatles (the earliest record in my collection), so now it’s time for the next record (as far as The Beatles’ chronology goes) – A Hard Day’s Night.

Unlike my With The Beatles, my A Hard Day’s Night is not some first-edition foreign-pressed mono LP. My A Hard Day’s Night is only an Australian stereo re-pressing (like two other of my records – my first-pressings and re-pressings roughly split about half-and-half). But here’s some background info:

In Australia, The Beatles were (obviously) released on Parlophone until Apple Corps. entered the picture. But (I’m not sure if this is the case elsewhere) re-pressings of Parlophone-released Beatles albums were still released on Parlophone after 1968. But they weren’t released on the black-and-yellow label (or even the special Australian black-and-silver label) – they were released on something known as the ‘orange label’.

Dun dun DUNNNN....

Dun dun DUNNNN….

The ‘orange label’ was used for re-pressings from 1969 to the early 1980s, and is featured on several records in my collection (including my Beatles Box – yes, mine is released on Parlophone, not Readers’ Digest. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, go Google it). As far as I know, it was used in Australia only. After studying this website (The Beatles’ Australian Records Labelography), the above appears to have been pressed in either 1969 or 1979.

‘Orange label’ records are okay, but I am on the definite look-out for first-edition versions (excepting the Box – that is first edition) of all the ‘orange labels’ I have. Why? The ‘orange labels’ are very flimsy, as Australian records from the ’70s became of a lesser quality than their ’60s counterparts. Apparently this is because many of the record factories went across the ditch to New Zealand, so all the LPs produced locally are thin and sensitive and don’t work too well. Fortunately, there are barely any scratches on this one, so it actually plays better than I thought (though it still crackles more than my thicker ones). But I’ll shut up now and upload some pictures so you can all see for yourselves (please excuse the quality – lighting isn’t too fab):

The back - complete with the original sleeve notes! But alas, no backflaps...

The back – complete with the original sleeve notes! But alas, no backflaps…

Yes, it's in stereo. You may notice that the number that tells you what number in the pressing it is is not there. This is true for all Australian Beatles records - they are seemingly set out differently to their British counterparts.

Yes, it’s in stereo. You may notice that the number that tells you what number in the pressing it is is not there. This is true for all Australian Beatles records – they are seemingly set out differently to their British counterparts.

Told ya' it was Aussie! Well, to be exact, it's New South Welsh... Considerably up north from here.

Told ya’ it was Aussie! Well, to be exact, it’s New South Welsh… Considerably up north from here.

The cover without the plastic slip over the top. You probably can't see it in this picture, but the cover is actually made from a different kind of cardboard to the original pressings.

The cover without the plastic slip over the top. You probably can’t see it in this picture, but the cover is actually made from a different kind of cardboard to the original pressings.

This was taken in an attempt to show you how flimsy the record is, but it doesn't really work unless I compare it with one of my first pressings (and I can't be bothered). But you get the picture. And you can go behind the scenes of 'AYNITB' if you look extra carefully at the laptop screen.

This was taken in an attempt to show you how flimsy the record is, but it doesn’t really work unless I compare it with one of my first pressings (and I can’t be bothered). But you get the picture. And you can go behind the scenes of ‘AYNITB’ if you look extra carefully at the laptop screen.

Side 2 of the record, top view.

Side 2 of the record, top view.

So there you go – my A Hard Day’s Night in a…cardboard box! 😉

I updated my iPad to iOS8 on Friday! And yes – those of you who know me IRL will know I completely avoided updating to iOS7, so I’m being slightly hypocritical by liking it so much, but stuff that! My favourite bit of iOS7/8 (it was a 7 feature, but I only got it with 8) is iTunes Radio. I’ve been listening to The Beatles channel all weekend! Did you know that The Beatles are the only artist to have their own proper channel, as compared to an ‘artist’ channel?

And I’ve made some more progress with a song I’ve been trying to write! As you may or may not know, I’m an aspiring alt. rock singer/songwriter/muso, under the alter-ego name of Sadie of Kirkcaldy (‘Sexy Sadie’ and ‘Cry Baby Cry’ mashup). Up until now, I’ve only done Beatles covers, and now I’ve made some progress with my own song! I can’t upload it on here now – a) it’s not finished; and b) it’s not on Soundcloud, which is the only way I can upload it here – but I’m fairly sure the song’ll be called ‘Whimsy’, and it uses a children’s xylophone (yes, you read right – but it actually sounds really good) and an acoustic capo-ed guitar (played in E with D-major chords), and I will eventually add melody/harmony vocals, a lead guitar and some kind of percussion. I wish I could upload the template for it that I made earlier today, but sadly I can’t; I promise ‘All You Need Is The Beatles’ will be the first place I’ll share it, though!

As I said above, only one more week until holidays! Then you’ll get posts every three – or even two, if I can be bothered – days! Yay – maybe then I’ll get some of my ideas down before I forget them! And this time next week I’ll have seen ‘Looking Through A Glass Onion’, which I am really looking forward to (thank you to my godparents for buying me a ticket for my birthday!) But until then, good day sunshine 🙂

 

A ‘Good Night’ (pun intended) at The White Album Concert!

 

The promotional poster for the gig.

The promotional poster for the gig.

And me before the show, in my White Album shirt (which was my only Beatles shirt until last month!). Yes, and I do wear things other than Beatles shirts...

And me before the show, in my White Album shirt (which was my only Beatles shirt until last month!). Yes, and I do wear things other than Beatles shirts…

 

Hey Bulldog/Jude/all,

Well, as you have probably gathered, I went to a gig last night. And that gig was none other than the critically-acclaimed White Album Concert! As I explained in my previous post, The White Album Concert is made up of four well-known Australian musicians (Tim Rodgers of You Am I, Chris Cheney of The Living End, Phil Jamieson of Grinspoon and Josh Pyke, an ARIA-Award-winning singer/songwriter – a soloist, too, unlike the other three) singing/playing the entirety of The Beatles (better known as The White Album), along with a 17-piece band. The show was toured once before – in 2009 – and has been travelling around Australia since the 13th of this month. As you can probably guess, Adelaide had one of their last shows – the second-to-last, to be exact. The show was held in the Festival Centre – our fancy theatre where a lot of shows are held (also the second-biggest venue in SA).

After being forced to park on the other side of town (the CBD isn’t particularly big, though – one could probably drive from one side to the other in ten minutes) due to the premiere of a play in the Dunstan Playhouse and some soccer match, we finally came to the Festival Centre. We (or more specifically, my Dad – thanks!) bought a program, which can be seen in the picture above, and, soon enough, we had entered the theatre and the lights were dimmed.

The show was begun with the band playing ‘Can You Take Me Back’ (the unrelated coda at the end of ‘Cry Baby Cry’, if you are not familiar with the title), before Chris Cheney ran onto the stage, and began playing ‘Back In The USSR’! This was followed by the entire contents of the first disc, each song being covered by either Cheney, Jamieson, Rodgers or Pyke. And then, twenty minutes after the last strum of ‘Julia’, the second half again started with Cheney – this time, though, playing ‘Birthday’. After the end of ‘Good Night’, however, the show did not finish – all four musicians came together (pun intended) to cover ‘A Day In The Life’ and a reprise of ‘Revolution’ (and most of the audience stood up and danced/sang at this point – including me)! And I should probably add that by the entirety of the White Album, I mean the entirety – this means their repertoire included ‘Wild Honey Pie’ and ‘Revolution No. 9’ (which didn’t sound much like the real thing – thankfully… But then, I listened to the entire track for the first time yesterday, and it was nowhere near as bad as I thought. I found John and George’s (non-edited) voices quite comforting, though – not sure I would have listened to the whole thing otherwise…)!

I don’t have a stand-out favourite performance, as all the covers were so darn good! I was, however, incredibly impressed by the fact that the White Album version of ‘Revolution’ was performed specifically as ‘Revolution No. 1’, and that the single version of ‘Revolution’ was kept for the encore. If I did have to choose a favourite bit, though, it would probably be ‘Cry Baby Cry’ (sang by Josh Pyke), ‘Rocky Racoon’ (Pyke, again – I don’t normally like this song too much, but it sounded like a ‘Oh! Yoko’ and ‘Racoon’ mash up!), ‘Everybody’s Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Monkey’ (Tim Rodgers), ‘Long, Long, Long’ (Pyke, again), ‘Yer Blues’ (Phil Jamieson) and Chris Cheney’s guitar-god moment, ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’! Other favourites included their versions of ‘Martha My Dear’, ‘I’m So Tired’ and ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, but to be honest, I really didn’t do too much favouring!

And did I prefer The Beatle Boys to the WAC? As with above, I really cannot choose, as they were both so different. (On a random note, I’m listening to Anthology 3 at the moment, and the acoustic version of ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ has just come on – I forgot how beautiful the demo is! I prefer it to the real thing…) As we all know, The Beatle Boys dressed up in the suits and boots and had their hair cut in moptops and put on Scouse accents – and what a great job of their tribute they did! The WAC was completely different, though – no dressing up, no accents (though Tim Rodgers did make a ‘rattle your jewellery’ joke in a Liverpudlian accent), no haircuts – just a night of electrifyingly-good music, sung by four relatively-famous musos. So again, I have no preference – let’s just say that they were both two of the best nights of my life! But this time, however, I took a lot of pictures, and only one video (0f ‘Cry Baby Cry’), so I will have something to show you of my own, for once – we were sitting in Row E of the dress circle, so I was in the perfect position to get some full stage shots! See below for my pictures and some YouTube clips of the concert in other states:

white album one

white album two

white album three

Note all the psychedelic lighting - I couldn't quite capture the beauty of them in single shots, but I tried! The acoustics were also amazing - it was so loud, but God, did it sound good!

Note all the psychedelic lighting – I couldn’t quite capture the beauty of them in single shots, but I tried! The acoustics were also amazing – it was so loud, but God, did it sound good!

white album five

The whole band!

The whole band!

 

The promo.

‘Birthday’

‘Revolution No. 1’ (gives you a good idea of the atmosphere – everyone singing!)

 

So there you – a review of my lovely night! I think I posted this last time, but here is the link to their website, so please check it out! Hope you’re all having a great day, wherever you are, and good day sunshine! 🙂

Thank You Mr. Postman! Pt. 2

 

The latest edition to my Beatle-y merchandise collection!

The latest edition to my Beatle-y merchandise collection!

 

Rubber Soul – John, Paul, George and Ringo’s sixth album, released in Britain on the 3rd of December, 1965; what does it mean to you? To me, it means a few things – a) it was the first Beatles studio album I purchased, b) I remember listening to it on a plane flight from Melbourne to Adelaide (where it snowed, yesterday – not in my part (where it stayed just about 8 degrees all day), but it still snowed!) just under a year ago, and c) to me, it marks when the later years of The Beatles’ career start. But now, it means something more – ‘cos look what came in the mail at about 11 o’clock (AM – obviously…) today! The above book is a Rubber Soul ‘song album’ – a magazine that contains eight ‘already standard songs’ off the album, plus three pages of ‘fabulous photos’! I ordered it off Ebay on Monday (Ringo’s birthday!), and (since it only had to come down from Queensland – the state at the very top of Australia, if you’re not familiar with the geography of my country) it has arrived surprisingly quickly! I had a flip through the pages, and it looks as though most of the songs are in the correct key signature, so I shouldn’t have to do too much transposing to bring them up/down to the way The Fab Four played them! The songs noted in the book are – in case you can’t read the listing on the picture (it would appear quite small on, say, an iPhone) – ‘Michelle’, ‘Norwegian Wood’, ‘Nowhere Man’, ‘Girl’, ‘Wait’, ‘If I Needed Someone’, ‘Drive My Car’ and ‘Think For Yourself’, and are printed in that order. In the middle of the booklet is a double-page spread of pictures of The Beatles taken at various points in 1965, and just over 3/4ths of the way through, there is a image-page dedicated to the Shea Stadium gig. So as you can see, I’m quite pleased with my latest purchase!

Just one more thing before I show you some pictures of the book – the mystery of when the book was published, as this is not apparent at first view. When I purchased the book, I was under the impression that it was printed in 1965, but as I will show a little further down, the book was being sold at a price of 80 cents. In Australia in 1965, our currency was the Australian pound/penny – it continued to be so until the 14th of February, 1966 (when it was all decimalised, and we ended up with the Australian dollar/cent). Interestingly, until the release of Revolver, Australian Beatles releases were always a couple of months behind the UK. Because of this, Rubber Soul (the last record to have a delayed release date here) was put on shelves on the 17th of February, 1966 – only three days after decimalisation. I’d assume that my book was released around the same time as the album, so my guess is that it was released some time between February (the date of both decimalisation – hence the price of 80 cents – and the Australian release of Rubber Soul) and August (the world release-date of Revolver – involving Australia for the first time…), 1966. I don’t think it could have been any later, ‘cos – as far as I can see – these ‘song albums’ were released with every LP (making the previous one out-of-print), the price would be too little for something even released in 1970s, and the pages look too old to be something much later. But now, I’ll stop writing, and show you my pictures; enjoy!

The '80 cents' thing I was talking about (off the back cover - it was scribbled off the front, as you may have noted from my image at the top of the post).

The ’80 cents’ thing I was talking about (off the back cover – the price was scribbled off the front, as you may have noted from my image at the top of the post).

The publishing information - interesting from the point of view of an Australian Beatlemaniac...

The publishing information – interesting from the point of view of an Australian Beatlemaniac, but worth a look…

A page of music - 'Nowhere Man', to be exact. This image might be illegal (I don't know), so please look at my 'Disclaimers' post if you are thinking of suing me (though I doubt some Apple Corps. official would bother to read such blogs)...

A page of music – ‘Nowhere Man’, to be exact. This image might be illegal (I don’t know), so please look at my ‘Disclaimers’ post if you are thinking of suing me (though I doubt some Apple Corps. official would bother to read this)…

A double-spread of pictures (yay!)! Oh, and just look at that picture of John in the right corner of the left-hand page - oh my, was he attractive :-) !

A double-spread of pictures (yay!)! Oh, and just look at that picture of John in the right corner of the left-hand page – oh my, was he attractive 🙂 !

Another page of music - 'Girl', this time. I love this song - it will definitely make my next 'Favourite Beatles Songs' post, and I can't believe it didn't feature on the first one!

Another page of music – ‘Girl’, this time. I love this song – it will definitely make my next ‘Favourite Beatles Songs’ post, and I can’t believe it didn’t feature on the first one!

The Shea Stadium pictures I was talking about, plus the last page of 'Drive My Car'.

The Shea Stadium pictures I was talking about, plus the last page of ‘Drive My Car’.

The last page - 'Think For Yourself', the song that turned me on to how good a songwriter George was! Note the different title font - it appears to have been used on both the first and last pages of music.

The last pages – ‘Think For Yourself’, the song that turned me on to how good a songwriter George was! Note the different title font – it appears to have been used on both the first and last pages of music.

So there you have it – an insider’s view of my latest Beatle-y thing! And now for a couple of other things…

A Hard Day’s Night might just make its way onto Australian big screens! I was giving The Beatles’ official website one of my weekly looks the other day, and I came across a page titled ‘A Hard Day’s Night Screenings Info’. I clicked on it – for no apparent reason (a glimmer of hope, perhaps?!) – and proceeded to read it. And, guess what? The article said (quote), “In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of its world premiere in London, The Beatles’ epoch-making music movie will have an extended run of screenings across the USA and the UK from 4 July 2014, with more global dates to be announced soon.” So this means that it might – just might – make its way Down Under, and, good gracious, would I be the happiest girl on Earth if it did! If you (like me) have an account on the website, make sure you ‘Favourite’ the page and keep your eyes peeled. If you don’t, however, I’ve posted the link here. But if you’re reading this in the US/UK, I’d assume you’ve already seen it – I’d love to hear what it was like!

(And finally…)

Today is a special day for me, because it marks exactly one year since I purchased my first Beatles album! About six months earlier (after becoming a casual fan three years before – this being revived again in 2012), my then-best-friend turned me on to The Beatles’ music (after a playing of ‘All You Need Is Love’ one school assembly), and we spent our lunch-breaks singing tunes such as ‘Eleanor Rigby’ (her favourite Beatles song) and ‘Hello Goodbye’ (my then-fave – it’s the first Beatles song I have exact memory of listening to, so it’s a little special to me), and talking about our favourite Beatles (hers was Paul, and – as you will have gathered – mine is John). There was only one problem, though – I thought my parents didn’t like The Fab Four (I was very, very wrong), so I was too afraid to tell them about my new-found passion. So – about six months later – I found myself making up elaborate plots that would allow me to purchase a Beatles album without my mother and father cluing on too much. I remember scouring iTunes – which, at the time, was selling 1 and Help! at discounted prices – to try and find an album that I could start out with. I decided up on 1 – at this time, of course, I had no knowledge of their studio albums (would you believe it – I though Abbey Road was a Rolling Stones album!), so I unwittingly ended up with their best-selling, 2000-released compilation (not that I care!). But anyway, I plotted for about two weeks, and finally, my ‘B-day’ had rolled along. I’d purchased an iTunes card a few days earlier (as part of my plot), and bought a few other songs to make myself appear a little less ‘suspicious’ (as I thought myself at the time). But my plan fell apart (thankfully!), when Mum ended up going through a newly-purchased flute music book to try and find some music to recommend (all a part of my plot), she also ended up discovering I was a rookie Beatlemaniac – and I discovered that she also liked their music! Since then, my love has only blossomed, so I reckon the decision I made that day was one of the best (if not the best) decision I have made in my life! It’s funny to think that, a year ago, I didn’t even know what The Beatles really looked like (that was unfortunate for me 🙂 ) or that George sang (I soon discovered he wrote, as ‘Something’ is on 1) some Beatles songs, but now (a year later), I can recite their entire discography off in a matter of seconds, and I could tell you really obscure facts, such as the month and year that John got his drivers’ licence in, and how old he was (he got it in February 1965, and he was 24-turning-25)! I reckon I’ll love The Beatles for the rest of my life – and to think it’s all down to an album I bought exactly one year ago, today! So (to conclude this last paragraph), I’ve posted 1 – that life-changing album, for me – below. If you’re already a Beatlemaniac (like I assume most people reading this are), have a listen – who would pass up an opportunity to listen to a certain band that changed the course of the world?!?! But if you’re a casual fan, or haven’t discovered The Fabs all that much, yet, why don’t you listen to this album, too? Once you have, I guarantee you that your life will never be the same – all down to four talented musicians/singers/songwriters that changed so many other lives, too. I salute you, John, Paul, George and Ringo! So here is that album that changed my life, and I’d like to think that it’ll help change many others, too:

 

So now, on this sunny afternoon (to quote The Kinks) that is also an extremely valid candidate for the coldest day in our long-cold-lonely Winter (to quote The Beatles), good day sunshine! 🙂

 

 

 

I Saw The Beatle Boys Standing There

With 'Paul' and 'Ringo'...

With ‘Paul’ and ‘Ringo’…

 

And 'John' and 'George'...

And ‘John’ and ‘George’…

 

Last night would quite easily qualify for one of the best nights in my entire life. Excluding the George Harrison tribute show I saw earlier this year, an Etype Jazz show I saw five years ago (both of which are a part of the Adelaide Fringe, so I don’t count them), and my annual trip to WOMADelaide, I saw my first rock concert; a Beatles tribute called The Beatle Boys, at Adelaide’s Thebarton Theatre!

The Beatle Boys are an Australian Beatles tribute from Newcastle, NSW, and they are currently going around Australia and New Zealand, recreating The Beatles’ ’64 tour of Australia and New Zealand, as a part of the 50th anniversary celebrations. Unlike some of the other tribute bands I’ve heard of, they weren’t tacky (i.e. they didn’t wear fake-looking wigs; they actually had their hair cut in a moptop, or Arthur – as George called the infamous ‘do in A Hard Day’s Night!) and they weren’t deadly serious about the entire ‘We-have-to-be-exactly-like-The-Beatles’ thing. In fact, the show was a bit tongue-in-cheek; the guy who played Paul put on exaggerated facial expressions, and there was no shortage of jokey Beatles references! According to their website, they’ve been playing for 26 years, and have played everywhere from Swaziland to Canada. Two years ago, they did a ‘rooftop concert’ on top of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney, which I just watched on YouTube, and is really cool (I then proceeded to watch Let It Be music clips, and then daydream about the future day it is released on DVD/BluRay; it was supposedly going to be released last year, but that clearly didn’t happen!)!

Last night, their gig consisted of two parts, separated by an interval; the first part was a recreation of The Beatles’ Melbourne concert, with the addition of ‘This Boy’ (which was only played here, in Adelaide). Before the band appeared on the stage, a collection of footage showing The Beatles arriving in different cities around the country, and songs recorded by John, Paul, George and Ringo/Jimmie’s support acts were shown/played on a screen. Finally (as excitement built up), the lights dimmed, the final support act’s song faded, and The Beatle Boys ran onstage. They did a great job with their version of The Beatles’ concerts from 50 years ago; in some aspects, it was an almost-exact replica of the footage I have seen (Scouse accents and all), and in others (as I said before) it was very tongue-in-cheek, and not-at-all serious. They encouraged us to scream (when they weren’t playing!), dance, clap, sing and generally be a Beatlemaniac – naturally, I did all of the above things!

The second part consisted of “more than eleven songs,” as the man who played John joked, including material right from 1962 to 1969. They played everything from ‘Love Me Do’ to ‘Get Back’, ‘I Should Have Known Better’ to ‘Revolution’, and ‘Day Tripper’ to ‘Back In The USSR’. There were some very funny jokes in this part, including ‘Paul’ remarking, “The White Album is my favourite album, ’cause we could do whatever we wanted!” I did a lot of filming of both halves, so once I’ve downloaded them off Mum’s phone, I’ll pop them on here, so you can see the band yourself. It’s not quite the same as seeing them live (which – trust me – is quite an experience), but you’ll get an idea of how good they were!

After the show, The Beatle Boys came out to the foyer, and the majority of audience lined up for photos and/or signatures. As you can see above, I got pictures with them all, and as you can see below, I got them to sign my ticket. They were all really nice men, and they were quite impressed with my gorgeous John-and-Paul tee from last weekend! Just think – what a gorgeous job ‘Beatles impersonator’ would be. I can think of almost nothing better than playing John for a group of like-minded fans; sadly, though, this is impossible because I am a girl, so I’ll happily be content with my dream of being a musician when I leave school.

I’ll just upload the rest of my pictures – after that, good day sunshine, until I upload the videos of the concert (tomorrow, maybe)!

My signed ticket!

My signed ticket!

Outside the Thebarton Theatre (or the Thebby, as locals call it)...

Outside the Thebarton Theatre (or the Thebby, as locals call it)…

Waiting, waiting, waiting...

Waiting, waiting, waiting…

 

It was 50 years ago today…

Today is a very exciting day for all Beatlemaniacs who reside in Adelaide – it was 50 years ago today, when The Beatles came to Adelaide (excuse lame Sgt. Pepper pun)! I’ve been in an unusually good mood all day, but sadly, my poor friends (whom I’ve no doubtedly overloaded with squeals of, “If only I were alive 50 years ago,” and, “John was here, 50 years ago,”, etc., etc.,) are not sharing the love. But anyway (their loss), I thought I’d do a special 50th anniversary post, jam-packed with YouTube clips, photos, fun facts and more; enjoy!

As most people know, Adelaide nearly wasn’t on The Beatles’ Australian agenda. A verbal deal had been struck up between Ken Brodziak (an Australian tour promoter) and Brian Epstein in 1963, some time before ‘Please Please Me’ rocketed to Number One in Britain. The promoter – unsuspecting of The Fab Four’s future fame – had booked the four for concerts in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. Adelaide had been left off the list.

A few weeks later, ‘Please Please Me’ ruled the charts in Britain, and John, Paul, George and Ringo performed on Sunday Night At The London Palladium, to hordes of screaming girls; Beatlemania was born! Meanwhile in Australia, Ken Brodziak was unsure whether his deal with Epstein would be fulfilled – to his luck, it was, and The Beatles were scheduled to perform in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane in June 1964. But something was missing – The Fab Four would not be coming to Adelaide…

A little later, Bob Francis (a relatively-famous South Australian DJ on 5AD) heard that The Beatles were touring Australia, but skipping Adelaide. He was not happy, and set his mind on bringing The Beatles to the Festival State. He set up a petition, which gathered thousands of signatures, and after much lobbying from him and other Adelaide fans, John, Paul, George and Ringo were set to perform four concerts here, over the 12th and 13th of June. Despite the fact that Ringo was hospitalised with tonsillitis and pharyngitis, thus unable to come to Australia before the others made their way up to Melbourne, Adelaide still managed to make Fab Four history, by giving them the largest reception they would ever receive, of somewhere between 300,000 and 350,000 people (over half the population at the time)! And for that, us Adelaide-ean Beatlemaniacs are very grateful.

YouTube Clips

 

 

This is a clip of bits and pieces of footage from ’64, released this year especially for the anniversary by EMI Australia.

 

 

This one’s of The Beatles’ Adelaide press conference – I haven’t watched the whole thing (shame on you, so-called ‘hardcore Beatlemaniac’!), but I’ve seen some bits; John has some really funny jokes, in it!

 

 

And well, here it is – the strangely-prophetic John Lennon quote from the Adelaide press conference that featured upon the end of When The Beatles Drove Us Wild, that made me cry. As I said last post, what a tragic irony. Rest in peace, John – love you to bits!

 

 

And this one’s a little lighter than the last – fragments of John, Paul, George and Jimmie’s Adelaide gig! I can just imagine being in the audience, that day – the atmosphere just seemed so electric, even from a YouTube clip!

 

Photos

The Waving Beatles

Not in Adelaide (Ringo’s in it) but anyway – I love the photo (for no apparent reason), so who cares?!

Oz Beatles Crowd

Here’s photographic proof of why Adelaide is so cool…

the beatles in adelaide three

Performing live…

the beatles in adelaide four

Front page of The News (Adelaide’s former evening newspaper) on B-Day.

the beatles in adelaide five

Too-cool-for-words people greeting an incredibly-cool city…

 

Fun Facts

Did you know…

  • Australian politician Bob Katter was among a group of Beatle-haters who pelted eggs at The Beatles in Brisbane.
  • Ian ‘Molly’ Meldrum was kicked out of The Beatles’ Melbourne concert for being ‘too hysterical’.
  • Jimmie Nicol – Ringo’s replacement – says that ‘being in The Beatles was the worst thing that happened to him’, and now lives as a recluse in London.
  • The Beatles almost cancelled their trip to Australia – after Ringo fell ill (the day before The Beatles embarked on their 1964 world tour) a loyal George refused to play with a replacement, though was eventually convinced (how sweet!).

 

This time tomorrow, I will be enjoying a Beatles tribute – put on by tribute band The Beatle Boys – recreating their Australian tour; it should be loads of fun, and I will report on Saturday! But for now, I’ll pause the White Album (but ‘Julia’ is so beautiful – and sad, too) and enjoy the special hour of Beatle-y fun that local radio station Cruise 1323 AM will be putting on in half an hour. But anyway, enjoy this special ‘birthday’ (pun on song playing off the White Album currently – see if you can guess what it is!) in Beatles history, and good day sunshine!

 

 

‘When The Beatles Drove Us Wild’ Review

The band in question (or three quarters - note Jimmie Nicol) arriving in my hometown - Adelaide, Australia!

The band in question (or three quarters – note Jimmie Nicol) arriving in my hometown – Adelaide, Australia!

This week is absolutely giant for Aussie Beatlemaniacs – it marks 50 years since The Fab Four landed here, in our little far-fetched corner of the globe! As one would imagine (coincidence – I am currently listening to Imagine!), heaps of celebrations have been circulating around the country, which I discussed in my earlier post ‘Beatle-y News’. Even my school has been celebrating (ever so slightly!) – there was a display of Beatle books in the library foyer today, to my delight! However, as I am sitting here, listening to ‘Jealous Guy’, I thought I’d write about one particular aspect of my country’s festivities; When The Beatles Drove Us Wild, which was screened on ABC1 at 8:30 PM, last night.

You might like to watch the trailer for the documentary – I have posted it below:

Before you go around thinking it was just another middle-of-the-road Beatles doco with a disgustingly-large percentage of time spent discussing groupies/drugs/etc., with most of the interviews being held with the husband of the best friend of the cook of the bus-driver of the chauffer of Brian Epstein’s second cousin (or something), think again. The documentary was made this year, especially for the 50th anniversary of John, Paul, George, Ringo & Jimmie Nicol landing in Australia, and featured everything from never-seen-before archival footage, to interviews with the likes of Bob Francis (a famous South Australian DJ who campaigned for The Beatles to come here – thank God he was successful!), Jenny Kee (an Australian fashion designer who ‘spent a night’ with John) and Glen A. Baker (a music journalist and Beatles aficionado).

After the prologue, opening credits and an insight into what being a teenager in the ’60s meant, the documentary was split into six categories: Sydney (first time around – only a short stop), Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney (second time – proper concerts, now), New Zealand and Brisbane. After this, Australian rockers (such as Jim Keays of Masters Apprentices and Glen Shorrock of Little River Band) discussed how The Beatles changed the music industry; shortly after, the doco wrapped up with John Lennon’s quote that, as The Advertiser promised, pierced my heart, thus made me quite emotional and sent chills down my back (to say the least).

Apart from Bob Francis, Jenny Kee, Jim Keays, Glen A. Baker and Glen Shorrock, the interviewees ranged from a feminist/social scientist to fellow Adelaide fans (these ones, however, were lucky enough to be my age in ’64 – their mothers also booked them a hotel room in the hotel in which The Beatles were staying). Apart from a couple of men, who were carrying on with their free-sex/partying/pill-taking tales (which would have went on – no doubt about that – but would have been exaggerated a bit), each interviewee had a very interesting perspective on The Fabs, which were equally as interesting to listen to. I really enjoyed the documentary, and I think it’s a must-see for every hardcore Beatlemaniac.

And as for closing words that John said at an Adelaide press conference, that pierced my heart? SPOILER ALERT.

(After being asked whether he is aware of possibilities similar to JFK)

“Well, I think you’ve got to be – you might get shot.”

TRAGIC IRONY. Rest in peace, Johnny.

Anyway (on a lighter note), it’s 50 years today since The Beatles landed in Sydney, and 50 tomorrow since they landed here, and received the biggest reception they would ever receive. Be sure to check out the paper, tomorrow (if you live in Adelaide), and listen to Cruise 1323 AM, who are doing a one-hour special, from 7-8pm. I’ll do a special post, too.

Good day sunshine, for now.