My Beatles Record Collection Pt. 6 – ‘Revolver’

This is the 'Rubber Soul' cover, unstretched and uncropped. Also just turns out to be one of my very favourite Fabs pictures... :-)

This is the ‘Rubber Soul’ cover, unstretched and uncropped. Also just turns out to be one of my very favourite Fabs pictures… ūüôā

And ‘My Beatles Record Collection’ returns for another month… Part 6 already, eh? Doesn’t feel like it’s been going that long at all! But anyway, this month we have a particularly special album. In many circles, this deservedly-lauded masterpiece has taken over from¬†Pepper¬†as being regarded as The Beatles’ best album. It arguably began the trend of of “arty” album art. It made number 3 on¬†Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums (though it topped the same magazine’s ‘Favourite Beatles Album’ readers’ poll). It turns out to be my favourite album of all time. Not to mention the fact that the creator of¬†Mad Men¬†paid $250,000 to feature the last track of this particular album on an episode of the TV show. Thus, I can only be referring to…Revolver!

Sessions for¬†Revolver began in April 1966, after Brian Epstein’s plans for a third film were vetoed by The Beatles. (A third film would not be seen until the — depending on your view — masterpiece and/or complete disaster known as¬†Magical Mystery Tour.) It was decided that the film would be replaced with the release of an LP, which would be one of only two new Beatles releases that year. During this time, The Beatles started using the studio almost like another instrument. EMI engineer Ken Townsend invented artificial double tracking whilst engineering the recording of the album. The album also marks the first time The Beatles went full-out psychedelic, with psychedelic elements evident on nearly every track. The album also included a backwards guitar solo on ‘I’m Only Sleeping’, the first “samples” on ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’, much baroque instrumentation on many Paul tracks on the album, revolutionary (and just dead awesome!) drum parts from Ringo on most songs and the first real crossover of Eastern and Western music on ‘Love You To’. It is also the only album in which the balance of power between John and Paul — from a tracklisting point of view — is completely equal, and marks the time when George really becomes a very talented songwriter. The album was almost ignored at the time of release — overshadowed by John’s ‘Jesus’ quote — was probably one of The Beatles’ least successful albums at time of release. But anyway,¬†Sgt Pepper and¬†Abbey Road are certainly the most iconic Beatles albums, but¬†Revolver is probably the most revolutionary of them all. Though it is very much underrated by the general public, it is often regarded as the best Beatles album by many Beatles/music fans/experts. And very much deservedly so.

Revolver has been my favourite Beatles album since February last year (just before I bought the vinyl featured in this post), but this particularly came to light about seven months later. I remember listening to the album on this particular vinyl after school one night. I reckon it got to the solo in ‘I’m Only Sleeping’ before that particular listen affected me so profoundly that I would never think about The Beatles in the same way again. I read a study conducted mid last year that said that music can get the listener high, and I think that is what happened to me that night. Of course I had called The Fab Four my favourite band for over a year, but it was only then that, for the first time, I really knew what that meant. But anyway…

revolver 1

This is the cover of my LP. If you look closely, you’ll see that it’s a bit tatty to say the least. (There are a few rips in the spine, and bits of the cover have fallen off around the other edge, leaving only the brown cardboard underneath.) But I don’t really care. I think that it gives the record a bit of a story, a bit of charm.

revolver 2

This is the back cover of the album. (I really love the photo session from which the photo on the back originates! Bob Whitaker was so talented. And George’s jacket & John’s shirt are gorgeous.) As you can see, it — like the front — isn’t in particularly good condition, either. The vinyl has seemingly marked it over time. But oh well. The vinyl is an Australian pressing, as shown with the text along the bottom of the cover.

revolver 5

But it’s not just any Australian pressing — it’s a¬†first Australian pressing! One of my only two first¬†Australian pressings, I might add. (Though I recently obtained a third-pressing black-and-gold Please Please Me that I’ll have to go back and do after I’ve finished the studio albums.)¬†The backflaps have a glossy finish much like the front cover, which is contrast to the matte finish of the back. And on a different note, have a look in the right-hand corner — where the catalogue number is on all UK pressings. There, you will see¬†two catalogue numbers; one for the mono pressings (PMCO 7009) and one for the stereo (PSCO 7009). The actual catalogue number is on the label of the actual record, so you’ll see in a couple of photos down whether it is in mono or stereo…

revolver 3

Here’s the actual vinyl. There are quite a few light scratches on both sides, but the record plays near perfectly. Also note the black-and-gold label! The vinyl is probably one of the heaviest in my collection, due to it’s first-pressing-status. Maybe why it plays so beautifully… (But then, the album is — in my opinion — the most beautiful album ever released. I’m not sure it would matter that much to me whether it crackles or not.)

revolver 4

Close up of the label. And the catalogue number is PMCO 7009, meaning that it is in mono! Yay! First-pressing, Australian and mono! (Though it doesn’t have “remix 11” of ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’, as they were only found on the British first pressings.) The original owner has seemingly scribbled their name on the yellow ‘PARLOPHONE’ title — P Bunn. P Bunn looked after their album quite well, I must say.

And there we go! ‘MBRC’ for another month! Next month, tangerinetrees will be focusing on the very first Beatles compilation album, with arguably one of the coolest covers ever designed…

Oh, and I went busking with my guitar on Wednesday, and made $8.70AUD. I also got stuck with a man who tried to sing the various Beatles songs I was playing, but couldn’t really sing. But oh well. $8.70 is a lot more than most artists earn¬†on Spotify. It was a good experience.

Until next post, good day sunshine! ūüôā

I think I’m gonna be sad — I think it’s today…

A beautiful photo of John, who we sadly lost on this day. Love you.

A beautiful photo of John, who we sadly lost on this day. Love you.

On this day almost exactly 34 years ago (a previous Monday), an utterly horrible thing happened. A horrible, horrible thing. John Lennon was shot dead. I choose not to name his assassin, as he has said that he shot John for the fame that it could bring, and naming him would also be rewarding him. I choose to call him also what Paul calls him; ‘the jerk of all jerks’. I’m currently listening to Imagine, and am wearing my John-wearing-NYC-t-shirt shirt to remember him. (Not that I need any help with that, but anyway.) I’ve been half dreading this post. But here goes.

One of my very first Beatle-y memories is about John. Looking back, I think I may have known about him before I knew about The Beatles. It must have been 2009, which is coincidentally the year that the time machine in¬†Yellow Submarine stops on. I wouldn’t have yet been ten. I remember eating dinner in front of our little box-shaped analogue TV in our dining room, at our tablecloth-covered round table which we no longer own. It must have been this day. I remember an image of the Dakota Building, and someone talking about this person named ‘John Lennon’. I then asked about who he was, and my mum explained to me who he was and how he died. Little did I know about how that man on the TV screen would change my life.

I don’t even remember why John became my favourite Beatle at first. ¬†In around June last year (after slowly becoming a vague Beatles convert four months earlier), I read a book called¬†Secrets and Sisterhood, which mentions John on the first page.¬†Secrets and Sisterhood¬†was my favourite book at the time (and still remains one of my favourite books, but the top spot is taken is by¬†Looking For Alibrandi). But I ¬†now know that John probably would have become my favourite Beatle, anyway.

In June 2013, I knew under 20 Beatles songs by name. I had no idea of the Lennon-McCartney songwriting partnership. And my knowledge of rock music was fairly rudimentary, as I played classical music. But as I became a bigger Beatles fan (and later, a bigger rock fan), and already being a reader, I also became a better-read Beatles fan. The first Beatle book I bought was a very expensive limited-edition printing of¬†The Beatles’ Illustrated Lyrics, which is actually signed by Alan Aldridge. But I soon started reading actual information on John. And it almost seemed as if I was reading about myself. I realised that there was someone out there, a bit like me. And they just turned out to be John Lennon. I suppose that’s when I kind of confirmed my favourite Beatle.

Of course, over the past year, I have read/listened/watched so much stuff about John (and yes, I still refuse to read¬†The Lives Of John Lennon) that I can quite safely call myself a John Lennon freak. (Not that I would call my love of him and the other Beatles ‘freaky’!) I¬†laugh at¬†his wit and humour; I find myself identifying with all his quotes about teachers and schools not recognising his ‘genius’ (long story). I find myself nodding in agreement at his political-themed songs; tears of laughter stream down my cheeks when I read one of his books (definitely recommended, if you have not done so already). I find myself studying every little thing (pun intended) in his songs (and then I find myself trying to recreate such things with varying amounts of); I wonder what the world would be like today if he were still with us. I thank him for making me think about politics, world issues, just important things, full stop; and yeah, I do find myself looking at pictures in which I find him attractive, but that’s not the point. And the music — well…

There was a study done earlier this year that shows that music can get the listener high. And I can identify with this¬†so much. In August this year, I had an experience that I’ll never forget. I was listening to my¬†Revolver vinyl, and part way through ‘I’m Only Sleeping’, an emotion I’d never felt before washed over me. A feeling of intense love and euphoria for the music. Thank you, John (and Paul, George and Ringo), for that.

John inspires me in so many ways, as well. As mentioned last post, John and George inspired me to pick up guitar. I might have my first (sort-of) gig coming up in January, something which I’m looking forward to very much. John inspired me to start writing songs. And whilst I haven’t written very many (yet), one of my goals this school holidays is to put some more time into that side of writing. John and the other Beatles actually reinvigorated my love of music, full stop. And whilst sometimes there is nothing more I want to do than jam out to Tame Impala, or dance around to The Black Keys, or sway and strum to Arcade Fire, or get that music high mentioned above from The Velvet Underground and Nico (especially ‘Venus In Furs’!),¬†The Beatles will forever remain my favourite band. And that’s just how I like it.

I see no problem in being sad at John’s death. Whilst I was born a considerable amount of time after his death, I love John very much. Unlike George’s death, for which he was ready and whilst very sad was not unexpected, John was shot. In a time where he was arguably the happiest he had ever been. And still far, far, far, far too young to die. It saddens me that someone who wrote a song about giving peace a chance died in such a violent way. John seemed to be looking forward to the rest of the ’80s. He had just launched back into the music world. He was at peace with himself. And yet someone had to take this all away. So close to Christmas, as well. I’ve chosen not to listen to Double Fantasy, as I feel it would be too painful, knowing what happens less than a month later.¬†I was reading someone’s memories of John’s death the other day, and they likened the loss as that of ‘a friend that I never met’. And I suppose that’s what it would have been like. John, to me, is like a friend I’ve never met. (And yes, I know I’m far too old to be having imaginary friends, but forget that.) And — as I said above — though I was not alive at the time of his life (and death), I still have no problem in being sad. Forget the fact that it’s unlikely anybody reading (or writing) this would have known him. And I see no problem in being angry at the person who shot him. Whilst we should probably keep in mind that the person who owned that gun was not right in the head, doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be angry that he shot John. It’s rather sad that he wasn’t treated, actually. But I’m still angry. And sad. But despite that, here are a few John moments:

Some say Paul wrote the intro to ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’, but they are wrong! Watch this scene from¬†The Beatles’ US Visit — John seems to playing around with the opening to the masterpiece as early as February 1964. The instrument he is playing is called a melodica. It’s a pity that there wasn’t more footage of John messing around with the melodica, but I s’pose the filmmakers didn’t know where that sequence would appear three years later.

Hee hee! I love this scene.¬†I mean, John Lennon in a bath playing with a toy boat. Need I say more? Will cheer you up… (And yes, I will stop fangirling.)

I’m probably being slightly controversial putting this up here, but I want to. In this clip, John defends his song ‘Woman Is the Nigger Of The World’. Being the feminist/leftist that I am, I already agree with the song, but what John says is too interesting to ignore. Still relevant today.

And of course this had to be here. I love the music video, I love the song. Some love to hate Yoko, but she inspired John. Without her, this (and the above — thank you, Yoko, for inventing that statement) wouldn’t exist.

I could write more than a few books on John and how I love him and how he has changed my life. But I won’t. I will conclude this massive post here. So, John, thank you. Thank you for making me a better person. Thank you for the music. Thank you for you. I can’t convey in words how much you have changed and influenced my life, but I have certainly tried today.¬†We will never forget you. Love tangerinetrees

john

john two

john looking so gorgeous

john three

My Ranking of The Beatles’ Albums

The Beatles with four of their five first LPs. One would assume the photo was taken in between August (Help!) and December (Rubber Soul), 1965.

The Beatles with four of their five first LPs. One would assume the photo was taken in between August (Help!) and December (Rubber Soul), 1965.

A note to begin with: The sun is up, the sky is blue (it’s beautiful and so are you / dear Prudence — why won’t you come out to play?), ‘All You Need Is The Beatles’ is only one hundred and thirty six views away from its thousandth view (well, it’ll be even closer by the time you read this) and COMMENTS HAVE FINALLY BEEN ENABLED ON THIS BLOG! Yay! So be sure to send me a postcard, drop me a line, stating point of view!¬†

I had this idea first a few months ago (about a month after I started this blog. It’s funny to think that it’s four months old — not that old in the scheme of things, I guess, but it feels more like last month that¬†I created my WordPress account and posted my ‘Welcome’ post, as opposed to over a season), and I thought I’d do it today! I hadn’t actually listened to all of The Beatles’ studio albums at that point (well, I knew most of the songs, but anyway), and I’m listening to the only one I haven’t yet done so yet¬†right now. I will not be including¬†Magical Mystery Tour in this post as I believe it is not a proper studio album (instead¬†a Capitol Records butcher job of the songs off the film and the band’s 1967 — that’s not to say I don’t love the album ūüôā ), and please remember this is only my humble opinion. Oh, and please remember that a worst ranking on a Beatles album ranking list in my case still makes it better than pretty much everything ever recorded (with maybe two or three exceptions). Pretty much everything. So I still love it dearly, but just not as much as number one!

Okay, okay, yes, yes — I’ll shut up now and get on with the ranking. Here we go!

12. Yellow Submarine

yellow submarine

I feel The Beatles (or Apple) really should have gone ahead with their original idea for the release of the¬†Yellow Submarine track — a double EP, as with the Parlophone release of the¬†Magical Mystery Tour¬†soundtrack. The songs ‘Yellow Submarine’ (whilst it probably needed to be included on the album for obvious reasons) and ‘All You Need Is Love’ (though I believe the ‘Yellow Submarine’ version is different from the better-known one) had already been included on different albums/singles/EPs, and did we really need the classical George Martin Orchestra bits on the album? This is, in fact, the only one I haven’t listened to in full before now (I opted for the better — IMO —¬†Yellow Submarine Songtrack) — I have watched¬†Yellow Submarine a billion-trillion (okay, maybe not quite that much) times, though, so I’ve of course heard them before. Actually physically LISTENING to the album does make me think that Apple didn’t need to follow in the direction of the Capitol butchers [insert certain famous¬†R. Whitaker-photographed cover here] and create a soundtrack in the style of the US¬†A Hard Day’s Night and¬†Help! albums, but it also takes me back to that Spring day a year ago when I first watched¬†Yellow Submarine. I remember sitting in our top room (the DVD player with the main TV wouldn’t actually work), absorbed by psychedelic masterpiece animation (‘Eleanor Rigby’ and ‘It’s All Too Much’ come to mind) and the middle-era Beatles tunes, many of which I hadn’t heard before (the only album I owned was¬†1, and I’d only listened as far as The Fabs’ other well-known hits and¬†Rubber Soul).

Despite my criticism of the inclusion of the GMO soundtrack and songs which had already been on other releases, I absolutely love the originals! ‘Hey Bulldog’, ‘It’s All Too Much’ and ‘Only A Northern Song’ are some of my favourite Beatles songs, and I don’t want to imagine life without them — thus I don’t want to imagine life with the¬†Yellow Submarine¬†album, either!

DID YOU KNOW?¬†Yellow Submarine¬†was the first album to feature the “devil horns” hand symbol on the cover.

BEST SONGS: ‘Hey Bulldog’, ‘It’s All Too Much’, ‘Only A Northern Song’

11.¬†A Hard Day’s Night

a hard day's night

Despite the above being the background image of this blog, A Hard Day’s Night¬†is far from my favourite Beatles album. Why, you ask? Here is my reasoning:

Those of you who know me will know I’m a alt./indie/folk/psych¬†rock fiend when I’m not listening to The Beatles. The Beatles usually satisfy this love — much of their early/late-era stuff rocks really hard, and they were of course comprised of folk and psych rock in their middle era (my favourite). Their only album that I find too poppy is¬†A Hard Day’s Night. Whilst the album is made up completely of Lennon/McCartney compositions, their songwriting hadn’t really started to mature yet, and it’s still all I-love-her-and-she-loves-me (excepting ‘I’ll Cry Instead’, which was probably The Fab Four’s first example of confessional lyricism). I’m not a huge fan of the title song, which I find too poppy in particular, and ‘And I Love Her’ doesn’t have the bluesy Lennon touch (though I think he contributed)¬†that other McCartney ballads have (i.e. ‘Michelle’), and ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’ I feel needs more pizzazz (I do actually like these songs, though). So I’m probably being a bit controversial citing a so-called “leap” in The Beatles’ career one of my least favourite Beatles albums, but who cares? There are actually some songs on the above that I love dearly, which will be listed below.

DID YOU KNOW? A Hard Day’s Night¬†is the only Beatles album to only comprise of Lennon/McCartney compositions. The next all-original album —¬†Rubber Soul — also had two Harrison compositions.

BEST SONGS: ‘I Should Have Known Better’, ‘Tell Me Why’, ‘If I Fell’, ‘Things We Said Today’ and ‘You Can’t Do That’.

10. With The Beatles

with the beatles

Whilst I think this beats the album below in the covers department (except here in Australia. Ugh. The Australian cover is atrocious. EMI Australia is the Capitol of the record-cover world), I don’t like it as much¬† I actually rank it equal to the below (you’ll have to wait to see what it is), but one had to go before. I don’t think the covers are as electrifying as the ones on the below, but then my favourite Beatles cover is on¬†With The Beatles (it’s ‘Money (That’s What I Want’). I do genuinely love this album, but I do prefer The Beatles’ later stuff, so unfortunately it ended up here.

DID YOU KNOW?¬†With The Beatles includes the song ‘I Wanna Be Your Man’, which was the Rolling Stones’ first hit. John and Paul finished the song off in the corner of a room whilst Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were talking.

BEST SONGS: ‘It Won’t Be Long’, ‘Not A Second Time’, ‘Money (That’s What I Want)’, ‘Please Mr Postman’

9. Please Please Me

beatles please please me

This is what ‘the below’ is!¬†Please Please Me! You can probably see what I mean about¬†With The Beatles having a better cover. It certainly ain’t¬†Revolver.¬†And I can see why The Beatles were going to parody it for the cover of¬†Get Back-turn-Let It Be. And Ringo has a quiff.

But seriously (without out-of-the-blue remarks concerning Richard Starkey’s choice of hair styling in the early 1960s), this album is a Beatlemaniac’s secret weapon whilst trying to point out that The Beatles were a¬†rock band, end of story. They rock dead hard on this album. And no wonder – they had come straight from The Cavern and Hamburg!

DID YOU KNOW? Most of Please Please Me was recorded within a marathon 12-hour session. John had a cold that day, and promptly lost his voice after the recording of ‘Twist and Shout’ (the last song to be recorded).

BEST SONGS: ‘Please Please Me’, ‘There’s A Place’, ‘Baby It’s You’ (I have liked the Shirlees’ version for years, so I was pleasantly surprised when I discovered The Beatles did it), ‘I Saw Her Standing There’.

8. Beatles For Sale

beatles for sale

This is, personally, one of my favourite Beatles covers, but of course the stupid cover butcher-rers over here in the Southern Hemisphere had to ruin it by creating a rubbish replacement. More on that later, though.

This is actually one of my favourite Beatles albums, despite it being 8. If you asked me tomorrow, it could be in a completely different place. It’s got some of my favourite Lennon compositions (‘I’m A Loser’, ‘I Don’t Want To Spoil The Party’), some of the most beautiful harmonies John and Paul ever did (‘Baby’s In Black’) and of course the amazing¬†drums in ‘What You’re Doing’!

DID YOU KNOW?¬†Beatles For Sale¬†(along with¬†With The Beatles) was one of the two albums to have an alternate cover in Australia. Apparently John actually wrote a letter to EMI in protest, but alas to no avail. C’mon EMI Australia – listen to the artist!

BEST SONGS: ‘No Reply’, ‘I’m A Loser’, ‘Baby’s In Black’, ‘I Don’t Want To Spoil The Party’, ‘What You’re Doing’

7. Let It Be

LetItBe

I love this album, but it’s mish-mashy. And it has my least-favourite Beatles song (the Spector version of ‘The Long And Winding Road’. Despite the fact he is a crazed murderer who let off guns in recording sessions at John’s ‘Lost Weekend’, I love his work on John and George’s stuff and most of¬†Let It Be. But ‘The Long And Winding Road’ should have been left as it was.) on it. But it has ‘Across The Universe’! And the album version of ‘Let It Be’ (which I think is far superior to the single)! And ‘I’ve Got A Feeling’! And ‘For You Blue’! And ‘Get Back’!

DID YOU KNOW? Though it was the last album to be released, Let It Be was the second-to-last album to be recorded. Abbey Road was actually recorded after.

BEST SONGS: ‘Across The Universe’, ‘Let It Be’ (album version), ‘I’ve Got A Feeling’, ‘For You Blue’, ‘Get Back.

6. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

sgt pepper

I know this is supposed to be The Beatles’ best album. But I beg to differ. I don’t feel it possesses the same magic that I feel a certain other Beatles psychedelic masterpiece does. But I still love this album. I listened to it the other day, and it was better than I remembered it. It did give me that euphoric feeling I get sometimes whilst listening to the Fabs, but not as strong as some other albums. But anyway, the thing is beautiful. Completely and utterly¬†beautiful. And that is all.

DID YOU KNOW? The crowd of people on the cover include Bob Dylan, Stu Sutcliffe, Mae West and Shirley Temple. John suggested having Jesus and Hitler, but that didn’t happen. Gandhi was originally on the cover, but was painted out at the request of EMI.

BEST SONGS: ‘Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’, ‘Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds’, ‘Lovely Rita’, ‘A Day In The Life’

5. Help!

beatles-help-uk-cover-art

 

Help! was the second Beatles studio album and the first actual LP I bought. And yes, I prefer it to¬†Sgt. Pepper — but as I said above, if you asked me tomorrow, it’d probably be a different story.

But however, The Beatles were maturing, and the film soundtrack side in particular is impeccable. Everything from ‘Help!’ to ‘The Night Before’, ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’ to ‘Ticket To Ride’ was of incredibly high calibre, and breaking boundaries like never before. The second side, not so much, but c’mon – it has ‘Dizzy Miss Lizzy’!

DID YOU KNOW? The song ‘Help!’ was actually a cry for help from John, who was depressed, trapped by Beatlemania and unsure of the path of his life at the time. He later called this period (going from about late ’64 to late ’65 — poor thing) his ‘Fat Elvis Period’. Some of his best work (i.e. ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’, ‘Nowhere Man’) came from this period, but at a cruel cost.

BEST SONGS: The entire first side.

4. The Beatles (a.k.a. The White Album)

the white album

 

This would have been far from my favourite Beatles album if you’d asked me a couple of months ago. Then I went to the White Album Concert, and was utterly blown away! It came further and further to the top of this list, and it made it to here!

Everything (well, nearly everything) in this album is good. And the thing is that there’s something for everybody. Whether you like hard-rocking proto-metal (‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, ‘Helter Skelter’), Eric Clapton (‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’), soft and hypnotic fingerpicking (‘Dear Prudence’, ‘Blackbird’), satirical social commentary (‘Piggies’), Paul’s — quote John — ‘granny s**t’ (‘Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da’) or even 9-minute experimental avant-garde-ness that involves a monotone voice reciting ‘number nine, number nine’ and Yoko Ono saying ‘You become naked’ (‘Revolution 9’), there’s something for you. And then there’s more!

DID YOU KNOW? The White Album includes John’s only solo Beatle track, ‘Julia’. Paul had been recording stuff by himself and releasing it as The Beatles as early as¬†Help!.

BEST SONGS: ‘Dear Prudence’, ‘Long Long Long’, ‘Cry Baby Cry’, ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, ‘Helter Skelter’, ‘Blackbird’– too many to list. That’s the beauty of a double album.

3. Abbey Road

Beatles_-_Abbey_Road

I used to always think of¬†Abbey Road and¬†Sgt. Pepper as part one and part two. Both experimental, both ahead-of-their-time — but I have always preferred¬†Abbey Road. As with below (you’ll see what it is), I first heard it on a plane. I now own it on CD, and I listened to it yesterday — for what seems like the first time, properly. The bass lines sounded¬†impeccable, it sounded like The Beatles were actually in the room singing ‘Because’, The Abbey Road Medley was better than it was before (a feat I thought impossible!)! Just, wow!

DID YOU KNOW? The last song The Beatles recorded together was ‘The End’ (the second-to-last track on¬†AR, if you count ‘Her Majesty’ as a proper track), rather fittingly. Apparently it was pretty much the only session after¬†John got together with Yoko that he attended without her (according to Geoff Emerick).

BEST SONGS: ‘Come T Just do yourself a favour and listen to the entire album.

2. Rubber Soul

rubber soul

Words (not even THE word – pun intended) cannot explain my love for this album. I heard this dead early in my Beatles fandom — only a month after I bought my first album,¬†1. As I said above, I first heard this on a plane. I hadn’t heard any of the songs before (excepting ‘Norwegian Wood’), and was I in for a treat! Some of the band’s most obscure numbers quickly became some of my favourites. And let’s just say it changed my life almost as much as¬†1 did. It’s my goal, in fact, to cover the entirety of this album. So far, I’ve done ‘The Word’, and I should be doing ‘I’m Looking Through You’ next.

DID YOU KNOW? The undistorted, cropped version of the cover (possibly my favourite picture of The Beatles) resurfaced after over 47 years early last year. It is still unknown whether it is genuine, but I like to think it is.

BEST SONGS: See ‘Best Songs’ for¬†Abbey Road — or in other words (coincidentally, ‘The Word’ is playing), do yourself a favour and listen to the entire album.

And now for number one (drum roll please, Ringo)…

1. Revolver

Revolver

From the ‘one, two, three, four’ mutterings of ‘Taxman’ to the trippy piano outro of ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’,¬†Revolver is undoubtedly a masterpiece. And in my opinion, it’s The Beatles’ best album. I first listened to this album (after being mind-blown by ‘I’m Only Sleeping’ two months earlier) in February, after bribing myself with it as a treat at the end of a particularly probing school day. And I was hooked. But nothing — nothing in this world AT ALL — quite affected me like a casual listening to my mono 1st-edition LP of the above one Tuesday evening. About halfway through ‘I’m Only Sleeping’, something hit me. An intense feeling of insane, euphoric love. That emotion continued through the rest of the album, whether it be to the acidic¬†overdrive of ‘She Said She Said’ (my favourite Beatles song), to the clavichord in ‘For No One’, the chorusing in ‘Yellow Submarine’, to the tight, harmonised ‘oohs’ in ‘Here, There and Everywhere’. Of course I had thought before that The Beatles were the best thing that ever happened to the music world, or maybe even the world in general if I was feeling particularly ambitious. But it was only then for the first time that I actually¬†knew it.

DID YOU KNOW? Suggested names for Revolver involved Abracadabra, Beatles on Safari, Magic Circles and After Geography. Revolver was decided on three weeks before the release.

BEST SONGS: I’m not even going to tell you to do yourself a favour. It’s essential to your existence that you listen to this album. Every single song on this album is mind-blowing, IMO. Every. Single. Song.

 

So there you go — that’s my opinion. And sorry, that was insanely long (and I’ve been writing this for nearly two hours). But I hope you read it, and I promise I won’t go that long again. Have a fab rest of your day, wherever you are, and good day sunshine! ūüôā

Thank You Mr. Postman!

Look what came in the mail, yesterday!

Look what came in the mail, yesterday!

 

Well hello, all,

School’s out, now, and I have three glorious weeks of mid-term holidays ahead of me ūüôā ! I’m listening to my favourite Beatles album (Revolver) this session, and ‘Love You To’ is currently playing. Well, I’ll get on with what I should write about – let’s see if I can get off this particular¬†tangent before ‘Here, There and Everywhere’ finishes!

(Above mission accomplished – be proud, John!)

A few weeks ago (whilst I was in Melbourne, in fact!) I was browsing Beatles-ville on Ebay, and I came across this little baby – a first-edition Canadian printing of The Beatles In Help!, as written by Al Hine. If you don’t already know, both A Hard Day’s Night and Help! were turned into short novels back when the films were released (oh, how I wish I could have been there!), and I imagine many a teenage girl would have purchased them. I already own an Australian printing of the A Hard Day’s Night edition – by chance, my mother purchased it, and then she discovered I was a Beatlemaniac; thus, I read it¬†about two months until I actually saw the film – so I thought I would get the Help! version, too! My printing is Canadian, as well, which makes it extra-special here in Australia. I posted some pictures of it, below (excuse the fact that my hand is in the majority of them!):

The blurb

The blurb

The title page

The title page

The story thus far...

The story thus far…

A page of text - it's the bit where Ahme is behind Ringo's vending machine, and bites his finger (if you're interested)

A page of text – it’s the bit where Ahme is behind Ringo’s vending machine, and bites his finger (if you’re interested)

A couple of pictures from the eight-page spread of images in the middle of the book

A couple of pictures from the eight-page spread of images in the middle of the book

HELP! (another of the pictures in the middle of the book - excuse my bad photography, on this one...)

HELP! (another of the pictures in the middle of the book – excuse my bad photography, on this one…)

Well, there you go – my latest Beatles collectable in a nutshell! Hope you enjoy – might post a little excerpt from the text when I’ve finished reading it (I’m halfway through Chapter 5). I’m going to enjoy my first night of school holls, now – if you’re reading this in Adelaide, keep warm and beware of the storm that is supposedly coming! Regardless of where you’re from, though – have a good night (cue massive string orchestra) and good day sunshine! ūüôā